GeoLog

General Assembly

EGU 2015 General Assembly programme is now online!

EGU 2015 General Assembly programme is now online!

The EGU General Assembly 2015 programme is available here. Take a look and – if you haven’t already – register for the conference by 12 March to make the early registration rates!

The scientific programme of this year’s General Assembly includes Union SymposiaInterdivision SessionsEducational and Outreach Symposia, as well as oral, poster and PICO sessions covering the full spectrum of the Earth, planetary and space sciences. The Keynote and Medal LecturesGreat Debates in the GeosciencesShort CoursesTownhall Meetings, and Splinter Meetings complete the overall programme.

There are several ways to access the programme, so you can explore the sessions with ease:

  • Browse by day & time: view the oral, poster and PICO sessions by their time and location, each sorted chronologically by conference day, time block and programme group
  • Browse by session: view the scientific sessions and their oral, poster and PICO sub-sessions by programme group
  • Personal programme: a great tool to generate your own personal programme, just select the specific presentations or sessions you’re interested in to create your own personal schedule
  • Papers of special interest: take a look at the abstracts that were selected by their respective session conveners to be of interest to the press & media

Want more ways to browse the programme? We’ll be releasing the EGU 2015 mobile app closer to the conference, stay tuned!

We look forward to seeing you in Vienna for the General Assembly (12 – 17 April 2015).

EGU 2015 Communicate Your Science Video Competition – Deadline Extended!

Earlier this year we launched the Communicate Your Science Video Competition, a great opportunity to share research in the Earth, planetary and space sciences with the general public. What’s more, there’s a free registration to the 2016 General Assembly up for grabs!

What’s it about? Young scientists pre-registered for the EGU General Assembly are invited to take part in the EGU’s Communicate Your Science Video Competition.
The aim: to produce a video up-to-three-minutes long to share your research with the general public.
The prize: a free registration to the General Assembly in 2016.

Your video can include scenes of you out in the field and explaining an outcrop, or at the lab bench showing how to work out water chemistry; entries can also cartoons, animations (including stop motion), or music videos – you name it! As long as you’re explaining concepts in the Earth, planetary and space sciences in a language suitable for a general audience, you can be as creative as you like.

Need some inspiration? Why not take a look at last year’s finalists:

How to enter

Feeling inspired? We’ve extended the deadline for submissions to 12 March. To take part, send your video to Laura Roberts (roberts@egu.eu), together with proof of online pre-registration to EGU 2015. Check the EGU website for more information about the competition and pre-register for the conference on the EGU 2015 website.

Last chance to enter the EGU Photo Contest!

From top left to bottom right, Erosion Spider by John Clemens, Icebergs at Night in the Antarctic by Eva Nowatzki, Star Trails in Rocky Mountain National Park by Martin Snow, MicROCKScopica – Symplectite in Granulite by Bernardo Cesare (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu).

Some finalists from the 2014 Photo Competition. From top left to bottom right: Erosion Spider by John Clemens, Icebergs at Night in the Antarctic by Eva Nowatzki, Star Trails in Rocky Mountain National Park by Martin Snow, MicROCKScopica – Symplectite in Granulite by Bernardo Cesare (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu).

If you are pre-registered for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 -17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! Winners receive a free registration to next year’s General Assembly! But hurry, there are only a few days left to enter!

Every year we hold a photo competition and exhibit in association with our open access image repository, Imaggeo and our annual General Assembly. There is also a moving image competition, which features a short clip of continuous geoscience footage. Pre-registered conference participants can take part by submitting up to three original photos and/or one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary and space sciences.

How to enter

You will need to register on Imaggeo to upload your image, which will also be included in the database. When you’ve uploaded it, you’ll have the option to edit the image details – here you can enter it into the EGU Photo Contest – just check the checkbox! The deadline for submissions is 1 March.

 

The ethics of mining

This guest blog post is brought to you by Nick Arndt, Professor at ISTerre and convenor of the the Great Debate at last year’s General Assembly, Metals in our backyard: to mine or not to mine. During the Great Debate the issue of whether the environment impact of mining outweighs the benefits vs. domestic metal production was questioned. With Europe currently importing between 60-100% of the metals that are essential for modern society, this posts explores how realistic it is to advocate for no mining in our own backyards.

Two years ago, in response to massive demonstrations on the streets of Bucharest, the Romania government reversed its decision to allow mining of the Rosia Montana gold deposit. Fierce discussion currently surrounds the Pebble deposit in Alaska, the fifth largest unmined copper deposit. Last summer, protesters derailed mineral exploration in the Rouez region, the first exploration authorized in France for 20 years. In all cases, the activists argued that the environmental risks were so great that mining was unacceptable. The slogan of the French protesters was:

“no mines!!! neither in Rouez, nor anywhere”.

When the Rouez activists were asked where the metals needed for modern society should come from, many answered that improved recycling and substitution would provide the solution. If only this were true! Recycling will indeed provide an increasing proportion of our metals in the future, but for decades to come, new supplies of metals and other mineral products will be required. The vast infrastructure of wind turbines and solar panels needed for a low-carbon society will consume huge amounts of mineral products, not only the well-publicized rare earths and other critical elements, but also enormous quantities of steel, aluminium, concrete and sand. All these materials will be locked up for the 20-30 year lifetime of the structures and will not be available for recycling.

Anti-mining march Auckland New Zealand. Credit: Greg Presland (distributed via Wikimedia Commons)

Anti-mining march Auckland New Zealand. Credit: Greg Presland (distributed via Wikimedia Commons)

To organize their demonstrations, the Rouez and Bucharest activists used cell phones containing numerous rare metals, including cobalt-tantalum that probably came from war-torn central Africa. Some of the titanium might have come from a mine in Norway, and some copper from Poland, but the other metals were imported from outside Europe

The main reason why oil prices have plunged in the past three months is the recent availability of large sources of gas and oil from shale in the USA. While the low prices will have a negative medium-term impact on movements to wean society from fossil fuels, in the short term they may provide a sorely needed boost to struggling European economies. France is in a peculiar position – it has been at the forefront of the movement to ban fracking and has prohibited even the exploration for non-conventional hydrocarbons on its territories, but its feeble economy will benefit from the low energy costs brought about by the availability of American shale-derived oil and gas.

Other Rouez activists recognized that new sources of metals were necessary, but they were adamant that the mining should be done in a manner that caused minimal environmental damage … and preferably far, far away from where they lived. While some metals can be imported to Europe from countries with stable and competent governments like Canada and Australia, most come from Africa, Asia and South America where governments are commonly too weak, too corrupt, or too poor to ensure that mining is done properly. The concerned citizens of Europe and other rich countries prefer that people in other regions put up with the nuisance associated with mining, and if this means that mining is done in places where the operation cannot be done properly, so be it.

The locavore movement argues that we should consume only what is produced within a short distance from where we live. The principle is normally applied to food, and is based on sound principles. Local consumption provides employment to local people and reduces ‘food miles’ – the distance from producers to consumers. But aren’t these ideas equally valid for metals? Is it reasonable and logical to shun green beans from Kenya while consuming copper from the Congo? The Aitik mine illustrates that metals can be produced correctly and efficiently in Europe. This mine, which is located in the far north of Sweden and respects stringent Swedish social and environmental norms, efficiently exploits ore containing only 0.27% Cu, far below the global average.

Rather than adopting the dubious stance that others should bear the burden of supplying the metals needed for European society, is it not more principled to argue that mining should done correctly, and in our own backyard?

By Nick Arndt, Professor at ISTerre & current GMPV Division President

 

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: