GeoLog

Laura Roberts-Artal

Laura Roberts Artal is the Communications Officer at the European Geosciences Union. She is responsible for the management of the Union's social media presence and the EGU blogs, where she writes regularly for the EGU's official blog, GeoLog. She is also the point of contact for early career scientists (ECS) at the EGU Office. Laura has a PhD in palaeomagnetism from the University of Liverpool. Laura tweets at @LauRob85.

Join us at EGU 2018: Call-for-abstracts is now open!

Join us at EGU 2018: Call-for-abstracts is now open!

From now, up until 10 January 2018, you can submit your abstract for the upcoming EGU General Assembly (EGU 2018).

In addition to established scientists, PhD students and other early career researchers are welcome to submit abstracts to present their research at the conference. Further, the EGU encourages undergraduate and master students to submit abstracts on their dissertations or final-year projects.

The EGU recognises that there are many outstanding students who would benefit from attending and presenting at the General Assembly and, therefore, provides a discounted registration rate to this group. Interested undergraduates can apply to present a poster, talk or PICO presentation on research undertaken in a laboratory setting, on a mapping or field project they’ve been involved in during their degrees, or any other research project of relevance.

Browse through the EGU 2018 sessions. Clicking on ‘please select’ will allow you to search for sessions by Programme Group and submit your abstract to the relevant session either as plain text, LaTeX, or a MS Word document. Further guidelines on how to submit an abstract are available on the EGU 2018 website.

An innovative presentation format – Presenting Interactive Content, better known as PICO – has been implemented at the General Assembly since 2013. PICO sessions bring together the advantages of both oral and poster sessions, allowing authors to present the essence of their work and follow it up with interactive discussion. Please note that some sessions are ‘PICO only’ sessions, meaning you cannot select oral/poster preference. If you are submitting to a PICO only session be sure to check out our PICO guide, for tips on how to prepare your presentation.

The deadline for the receipt of abstracts is 10 January 2018, 13:00 CET. If you would like to apply for financial support, now called the Roland Schlich travel support, to attend the 2017 General Assembly, please submit an application no later than 01 December 2017. We’ll be providing further information about how to apply for travel grants and how they are awarded in a forthcoming post.

EGU 2018 will take place from 08 to 13 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2018 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU18 is the official conference hashtag) and Facebook.

We are hiring: be our next Communications Officer!

We are hiring: be our next Communications Officer!

Do you have an interest in the Earth, space and planetary sciences and love blogging and using social media channels to communicate that passion? Then our latest job opening might be just right for you!

We are looking for a Communications Officer to work with the EGU Media and Communications Manager in maintaining and further developing media- and science-related communications between the EGU and its membership, the working media and the public at large. The officer will be tasked with (among others):

  • Manage the official EGU blog, including writing, commissioning and editing posts
  • Administer the EGU network of blogs, including division blogs
  • Manage the Union’s social media presence year-round
  • Work as a point of contact for early career scientists at the EGU office

We are looking for a good team player with excellent interpersonal, organisational, and communication skills to fill this role. The successful applicant will have an academic degree (e.g. MA, MSc, PhD), preferably in the geosciences or related scientific disciplines or in communication sciences. Candidates should also have the ability to understand and translate complex science into simple concepts and write about scientific research to general audiences in an engaging and accurate manner, as well as an expert command of English. Non-European nationals are eligible to apply.

To get a feel for what the position involves why not read this post by the current post holder, Laura Roberts Artal? Laura is happy to answer questions about what the role involves day-to-day, so feel free to contact here with questions at networking@egu.eu or on +49 (0)89 2180-6717.

The deadline for application is 5 November 2017. The expected start time for this position is January 2018.

Further details about the position and how to apply can be found here.

Feel free to contact Dr Bárbara Ferreira, the Media and Communications Manager, at media@egu.eu or on +49-89-2180-6703 if you have any questions about the position.

EGU announces 2018 awards and medals

EGU announces 2018 awards and medals

From 8th to the 14th October a number of countries across the globe celebrate Earth Science Week, so it is a fitting time to celebrate the exceptional work of Earth, planetary and space scientist around the world.

Yesterday, the EGU announced the 49 recipients of next year’s Union Medals and Awards, Division Medals, and Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Awards. The aim of the awards is to recognise the efforts of the awardees in furthering our understanding of the Earth, planetary and space sciences. The prizes will be handed out during the EGU 2018 General Assembly in Vienna on 8-13 April. Head over to the EGU website for the full list of awardees.

Nineteen out of the total 49 awards went to early career scientists who are recognised for the excellence of their work at the beginning of their academic career. Fifteen of the awards were given at Division level but four early career scientists were recognised at Union level, highlighting the quality of the research being carried out by the early stage researcher community within the EGU.

Nine out of the 49 awards conferred this year recognised the work of female scientists. Of those, four were given to researchers in the early stages of their academic career (at the Division level).

As a student (be it at undergraduate, masters, or PhD level), at the EGU 2017 General Assembly, you might have entered the Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards. A total of 57 poster contributions by early career researchers were bestowed with a OSPP award this year recognising the valuable and important work carried out by budding geoscientists. Judges took into account not only the quality of the research presented in the posters, but also how the findings were communicated both on paper and by the presenters. Follow this link for a full list of awardees.

Further information regarding how to nominate a candidate for a medal and details on the selection of candidates can be found on the EGU webpages. For details of how to enter the OSPP Award see the procedure for application, all of which takes place during the General Assembly, so it really couldn’t be easier to put yourself forward!

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 8  to 13 April. The call-for-abstracts will open in mid-October. Submit yours via the General Assembly website.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Measuring the wind direction

Imaggeo on Mondays: Measuring the wind direction

Remote, rugged, raw and beautiful beyond measure, the island of South Georgia rises from the wild waters of the South Atlantic, 1300 km south east of the Falkland Islands.

The Allardyce Range rises imposingly, south of Cumberland Bay, dominating the central part of the island. At its highest, it towers 2935 m (Mount Paget) above the surrounding landscape. In the region of 150 glaciers carve their way down the rocky peaks, toward craggy clifftops and the emerald green waters of the ocean.

Geologically speaking, the territory is unique. South Georgia sits atop the place where the South American Plate and the Scotia Plate slide past one another; exactly which can claim ownership of the mountainous outpost is highly debated.

As East and West Gondwana split, about 185 million years ago, South Georgia was pulled away from Tierra del Fuego, an archipelago off the southernmost tip of mainland South American, and experienced severe volcanism.

The island is so remote and exposed, it creates its own weather system. It sits in the path of very strong winds, the westerlies, which flow through the subtropical highs in the Southern Hemisphere.  As air flows over the high mountains of South Georgia, they generate atmospheric gravity waves (which transfer energy from the troposphere – the layer closest to the Earth’s surface – to the upper layers of the atmosphere, including the stratosphere, where the ozone layer is found). Atmospheric gravity waves are responsible for the transfer of considerable amounts of energy over large distances, and thus have a substantial impact on weather and climate.

It is precisely to study South Georgia’s atmospheric gravity waves that Andrew Moss, the author of today’s photograph, journeyed to the remote island back in January 2015 as part of the South Georgia Wave Experiment (SG-WEX). The project was led by the University of Bath, in collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey, the University of Leeds, and the UK Met Office. As part of this project Andrew worked with a colleague at the University of Bath (UK) to release radiosondes – a small, expendable instrument package that is suspended below balloon which measures pressure, temperature and humidity – to better understand the atmospheric conditions and measure atmospheric gravity-wave activity above the island.

The chilly, often cloudy and wet landscape is a wildlife haven. It is home to a staggering five million seals and 65 million seabirds.  The wildlife is so rich, on and off the island, that large swathes of South Atlantic waters surrounding South Georgia are protected and onshore activities which might disturb wildlife require permits.

“Over the course of the two-week field campaign, King Penguins, fur seals and elephant seals often surrounded us while we worked,” describes Andrew.  “During the trip, I captured a group of penguins, with their backs to the wind, clustered together on a windy day.”

References and further reading:

Imaggeo on Mondays: Atmospheric gravity waves (GeoLog, EGU Blogs, April 2017)

Hoffmann, L., Grimsdell, A. W., and Alexander, M. J.: Stratospheric gravity waves at Southern Hemisphere orographic hotspots: 2003–2014 AIRS/Aqua observations, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 16, 9381-9397, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-16-9381-2016, 2016.

South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands Government website

Radiosondes – a guide by the National Weather Service (NOAA)

Find out more about Andrew, here: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Andrew_Moss8