GeoLog

Sessions

Townhall and Splinter Meetings at EGU 2016

Townhall and Splinter Meetings at EGU 2016

In addition to the wealth of scientific sessions at the General Assembly (17–22 April 2016), there is also the option to attend other meetings during EGU 2016. These include Townhall and Splinter Meetings, which are organised by conference participants. 

Splinter Meetings

Splinter Meetings can also be organised by participants during the course of the conference and they can be public or by invitation only. To request a Splinter meeting, please complete the online Splinter Meeting Request Form. Splinter Meeting rooms are allocated on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please see the Splinter Meeting Overview to determine room availability before submitting your request.

Please note that splinter meeting rooms are not available for session extensions. Additional information on Splinter Meetings is available on the EGU 2016 website.

Townhall Meetings

Townhall Meetings are meetings open for all participants in the conference. During these meetings new initiatives or decisions are announced to a larger audience following an open discussion on the matter. There are seven Townhall Meetings currently proposed in the provisional conference programme. For an idea of the content that will be covered during these, take a look at the EGU 2016 website.

Anyone may organise a Townhall Meeting, subject to approval by the Programme Committee chair. Townhall Meetings will be scheduled from Monday to Friday from 19:00 to 20:00 in the conference centre’s lecture rooms. You could propose your own Townhall Meeting for the 2017 General Assembly, just stay tuned to next year’s call for sessions if you are interested.

GeoTalk: Lena Noack, Early Career Scientist Representative

GeoTalk: Lena Noack, Early Career Scientist Representative

In addition to the usual GeoTalk interviews, where we highlight the work and achievements of early career researchers, over the next few months we’ll be introducing the Division early career scientist representatives (ECS). They are responsible for ensuring that the voice of EGU ECS membership is heard. From organising short courses during the General Assembly, through to running Division Blogs and attending regular ECS representative meetings, their tasks in this role are varied. Their role is entirely voluntary and they are all active members of their research community, so we’ll also be touching on their scientific work during the interview.

Today we are talking to Lena Noack , ECS representative for the Planetary and Solar System Sciences (PS) Division and upcoming Union-wide ECS Representative (as of April 2016).

Before we get stuck in, could you introduce yourself and tell us a little more about yourself and your career?

I am currently a post-doc at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. I studied Mathematics in Germany at the Humboldt-University of Berlin, but discovered soon that I would prefer to work in a field that was my hobby for a long time – astrophysics! I found a PhD position at the German Aerospace Center at the Institute of Planetary Research in Berlin, where I could work for four years on the simulation of plate tectonics on Earth-like planets and the general evolution of terrestrial bodies in our Solar System and beyond. My post-doc position in Belgium allows me to pursue this fascinating topic.

Although we touch upon it in the introduction of this post: what does your role as ECS representative involve?

Apart from being the voice of the ECS in my division, for me the task of the ECS representative involves a wide range of other activities, both during the General Assembly and during the whole year. Luckily, my division doesn’t lack enthusiastic PhD students and post-docs, and we organize different events during the EGU and the related EPSC (Earth and Planetary Science Congress) like short courses and competitions, or this year for the first time also a smaller workshop directly dedicated to ECS. We are also responsible for the division’s outreach activities (via the EGU-PS website, the division Facebook page and a twitter account).

Why did you put yourself forward for the role?

My involvement as ECS representative actually started with organising the division’s Outstanding Student Poster award. In this function I started to communicate with other ECS (obtaining also feedback in this way and forwarding it to the PS president). Since I was also interested in different ideas on how to improve the networking between division ECS’s and the division outreach activities, the role of the ECS representative came quite naturally to me.

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What is your vision for the EGU ECS PS community and what do you hope to achieve in the time you hold the position?

Sadly my time as ECS PS representative will come to an end during the next General Assembly (the call for candidates to put themselves forward for the role of PS Division ECS Rep will be opening soon, so keep a look out for that if this is an opportunity you might be interested in!).

Future activities I could imagine include division internal networking events directly at the GA (for example a PS social event in the evening) and more ECS workshops organised outside of the GA. Also as I take on the role of EGU-wide ECS representative in April.

What can your ECS Division members expect from the PS Division in the 2016 General Assembly?
Apart from our usual tasks, including for example a flyer with all important ECS-related activities during the GA, as well as ECS-convened PICO sessions and interesting short courses co-organized with the other divisions, we have a special “bonbon” for the PS division this year. The annual GIFT workshop, bringing teachers to the GA to interact with scientists and for education-related session, will be co-organized in 2016 by the PS division. Under this header, we are organisinge a new contest (SECreT – Scientific Easy Creative Texting), to which every interested scientist can contribute by submitting a short (max 1 page), entertaining, but also informative texts about their research, which will be made available to all GIFT attendants. The contest is of interest to all ECS that want to share their work with non-scientists, and of course there will be awards!

How can those wanting to, get involved with the EGU?

Every ECS related to the PS division is very welcome to get more involved within our division. The easiest way is to get in contact with anyone of the ECS PS group at the GA, or to drop me an e-mail before. Our Facebook page can also be used to contact us, since the page is hosted by the ECS group of the PS division. Also, in 2016 our division is searching for a new ECS representative. If you are interested in that position, best to join the ECS PS group now! To apply as a candidate for the ECS PS representative, you only need to write an e-mail confirming your participation to the PS president Ozgur Karatekin and myself.

Abstract deadline for EGU 2016 fast approaching: A first-timer’s guide to the 2015 General Assembly

Abstract deadline for EGU 2016 fast approaching: A first-timer’s guide to the 2015 General Assembly

Are you considering attending the upcoming EGU General Assembly in Vienna? The conference brings together geoscientists from all over the world to one meeting covering all disciplines of the Earth, planetary and space sciences.. This year, the meeting will be held from the 17 to 22 April at the Austria Centre Vienna. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is upon us, closing next Wednesday the 13th January at 13:00 CET.

With 12,000 participants in a massive venue, the conference can be a confusing and, at times, overwhelming place. In addition, working out how the conference presentation slots are structured, how to submit an abstract and what happens after you have done isn’t always straight forward, especially if you are a first time attendee.

To help you find your way, we have compiled an introductory handbook filled with history, tips for submitting your abstract, presentation pointers, travel tips and a few facts about Vienna and its surroundings. Download your copy of the EGU General Assembly guide here!

Looking back at the EGU Blogs in 2015: welcoming new additions

Looking back at the EGU Blogs in 2015: welcoming new additions

It’s a little over 12 months since we launched the new look EGU blogs and with the holidays and new year approaching, what better time to take stock of 2015 as featured in the EGU Blogs? The past year has been full of exciting, insightful and informative blog posts. At the same time, we’ve welcomed new additions to the network and division blogs.

The network blogs

A recent highlight of the year has to be the addition of a new blog to the network: please welcome our new blogger Professor David Pyle, author of VolcanicDegassing – a blog about volcanoes and volcanic activity. In 2016 you can look forward to posts about David’s ongoing research in Latin America, the Caribbean, Ethiopia and Europe, as well as historical and contemporary descriptions or other representations of volcanic activity across the globe.

Vesuvius in eruption, April 26, 1872. Original caption ‘from a photograph taken in the neighbourhood of Naples”. (Palmieri and Mallet, 1873). Published in the Decemeber 15th post:  'The first volcanic eruption to be photographed?'

Vesuvius in eruption, April 26, 1872. Original caption ‘from a photograph taken in the neighbourhood of Naples”. (Palmieri and Mallet, 1873). Published in the Decemeber 15th post: ‘The first volcanic eruption to be photographed?

Richly illustrated and referenced posts have featured across the network throughout the year, with topics ranging from the journey aerosol particles go on throughout their life time, through to the role peculiarities of geology and geomorphology play in deciding on big international governance.

The most popular post written in 2015 was brought to you by Jon Tennant and featured the ichthyosaurs, an unusual turtle-fish-dolphin like marine reptile which cruised the seas 250 million years ago. The post focuses on the discovery of an ichthyosaur fossil named David, or rather Cartorhynchus lenticarpu as it is formally known, and how the remarkable specimen sheds light on the origins of these unusual creatures.

Matt Herod’s post on Geosphere in early December 2014 featuring the story behind the legal battle of Italian geochemists who were sued after publishing results stating that they could not find above background levels of depleted uranium in former Italian military firing ranges, is the second most read post across the network in the past year. With a strong resemblance to the L’Aquila verdict against the Italian seismologists, which was resolved in 2014, Matt highlights there are lessons to be learnt from both cases in the post.

Natural hazards and the April 2015 Nepal earthquakes featured heavily across the network too. In the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, the Geology for Global Development blog compiled a comprehensive list of links and resources which readers could consult to find out up to date and reliable information about the events in Nepal. A list which is still a useful resource some 8 months after the tragedy and which is the third most popular post on the network this year. Simon Redfern, of Atom’s Eye View of the Planet, wrote a piece on how and why scientists have identified Kathmandu valley as one of the most dangerous places in the world, in terms of earthquake risk.

With many of the network bloggers being in the thick of PhD research or having recently submitted their thesis, tips and hints for a successful PhD completion also proved a focus of the content across the network. Despite being originally written in April 2013, Jon Tennant’s blog post on why and how masters students should publish their research was the most popular post of the year! The most read post from Geology Jenga advertised a new, and free, online course on how to survive the PhD journey.

The division blogs

Since their launch last December, the division blogs have gone from strength to strength. Keeping you updated with news and information relevant to each division, they have also featured accounts of field and laboratory work, as well as professional development opportunities and open vacancies.

Throughout the year the division blogs have been enhanced through the addition of the Atmospheric Sciences, Energy Resources and Environment blogs and, most recently, the Biogeosciences Division blog too.

Cross-section of the age of the Greenland Ice Sheet from radar data. Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio and MacGregor et al., 2015.

Cross-section of the age of the Greenland Ice Sheet from radar data. Credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio and MacGregor et al., 2015.

The most popular post of the year was shared by the Seismology Division and touched upon the controversial topic of whether cloud formations can be used to predict earthquakes, while the Cryosphere Division blog’s image of the week of late October featuring a cross section of the Greenland Ice Sheet was the second most popular post. Round-up posts about the 2015 General Assembly, tips for convening sessions at the conference, as shared by Geodesy Division, and some soul searching by the Geomorphology Division as to why a proposed session wasn’t included in the final conference programme also proved very popular.

Get involved

Are you a budding science writer, or want to try your hand at science communication? All the EGU Blogs, from GeoLog (the official EGU blog), through to the network and division blogs, welcome guest contributions from scientists, students and professionals in the Earth, planetary and space sciences.

It couldn’t be easier to get involved. Decide what you’d like to write about, find the blog that is the best fit for your post and contact the blog editor – you can find all editor details on the individual blog pages. If in doubt, you can submit your idea for a post via the Submit a Post page on GeoLog, or email the EGU Communications Officer, Laura Roberts, who can help with initial enquiries and introduce you to individual blog editors.

Don’t forget to a look at the blog pages for a flavour of the content you can expect from the new, and existing, blogs in 2016. The blogs are also a great place to learn about new opportunities, exciting fields of research and keep up to date with news relating to the upcoming 2016 General Assembly.

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