EGU Blogs

Highlights

GeoLog

A guide to convening a session at the EGU General Assembly – Part I

A guide to convening a session at the EGU General Assembly – Part I

Convening a session at a conference can seem daunting, especially if you are an early career research and a first-time convener. That’s why we’ve put together this two part series to outline the main steps of the process. With the call for sessions for the 2016 EGU General Assembly open until 18 September 2015, now is the perfect time to give it a go! The key ingredients are an idea for a session, ...[Read More]

ERE
Energy, Resources and the Environment

Can climate data help to better predict floods?

Can climate data help to better predict floods?

The Groundwater Wetlands and Blogs Study Group is an unfunded, voluntary collaboration of professionals, formed in December 2012, focused on groundwater wetlands, bogs, and related systems.  The Study Group has about 250 members in 39 countries. Study Group members communicate primarily through a disciplined Yahoo Group listserve.  We are not a social network nor are we an environmental advocacy g ...[Read More]

GeoSphere

Geology Photo of the Week #45

Geology Photo of the Week #45

This weeks photo is once again related to permafrost and the Arctic….something tells me I miss being there. Anyway, the gorgeous photo below shows a terrific example of polygonal patterned ground from Siberia. Patterned ground is a phenomenon that occurs frequently in cold regions and is caused by the seasonal freeze-thaw of the active layer/soil. This process can produce a phenomenon called ...[Read More]

ERE
Energy, Resources and the Environment

Row, Row, Row Your Boat: Predicting Flood Impact with Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer

Row, Row, Row Your Boat: Predicting Flood Impact with Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer

For the second year there will be a Photo Competition at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2011. The finalists are below. To vote in the competition visit The Crystal Lounge, on the Green Level, First Floor of the ACV. In The Crystal Lounge you can view posters of the images and vote at the electronic voting terminals. The winner will be announced in the Crystal Lounge on Friday lunc ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: Mesopotamia, the ancient land between rivers

Imaggeo on Mondays: Mesopotamia, the ancient land between rivers

Mesopotamia, an area rich in history and considered as the cradle of civilisation, with the first populations establishing themselves in the region some 6000 years ago,lies between two great rivers: the Euphrates and the Tigris. The ancient territory spans areas of modern-day Iraq, Kuwait, the northeastern section of Syria and small sections of southeastern Turkey and southwestern Iran. The histor ...[Read More]

ERE
Energy, Resources and the Environment

Living with water: Floods in the Netherlands

This week’s “Wit and Wisdom” post is a guest entry by researcher Fabio Crameri from the Centre for Earth Evolution of Dynamics (CEED), University of Oslo. Many of us are guilty of creating figures using the colours of the rainbow in their full glory – it’s bold, exciting, and justifies the golden data contained within, right? Wrong! As Fabio explains, the rainbow scheme is misleading and should be ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Geosciences Column: The calamity of eruptions, or an eruption of benefits?

Geosciences Column: The calamity of eruptions, or an eruption of benefits?

So here is a question: why would anyone want to live in the vicinity of an active volcano? The risks are well known, with hazards arising from lava flows, lahars, ash falls, debris avalanches, and pyroclastic density currents, with many often having deadly consequences. But despite the danger, more than half a billion people live in the direct vicinity of volcanoes. Could it be that communities pr ...[Read More]

GeoSphere

Thaw Slumps of the NWT

Thaw Slumps of the NWT

I recently across an article that reminded me of my field work days in the early stages of my PhD in the Canadian Arctic at retrogressive thaw slumps. The article discusses the impending catastrophic drainage of a lake when the thin strip of land separating it from a thaw slump fails (see article), which it will inevitably do very soon. The story has now been picked up all across Canada in the con ...[Read More]

GeoLog

The EGU Network blogs are looking for guest contributions

The EGU Network blogs are looking for guest contributions

Are you a budding science writer, or want to try your hand at science communication? You might just be the person for our EGU network bloggers! A number of our network blogs would like to give their pages a bit of a boost and are seeking guest bloggers to contribute new, informative and engaging posts on an ad hoc basis. If you’ve recently been thinking about trying your hand at blogging, but aren ...[Read More]

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: The warming

Imaggeo on Mondays: The warming

Events of meteorological significance, such as thunderstorms, hurricanes, cyclones, jet streams and global-scale circulations can be described by a general term: atmospheric dynamics. When it comes to it, atmospheric dynamics deals with nothing more than air, which, in truth, is very difficult to directly observe, (with the exception of clouds and precipitation). This makes the study of atmospheri ...[Read More]