Geology for Global Development

Introducing Our New Authors (2) – Heather Britton

Exploring Zhangjiajie National Park, Hunan province, China

We’ve been introducing you to a couple of new faces on the GfGD blog, bringing fresh ideas and perspectives on topics relating to geoscience and sustainable development. We’re delighted to have their input, and look forward to their posts. Today we interview Heather Britton – a recent graduate of the University of Cambridge (UK). 

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I’ve recently graduated with a Master’s in Earth Sciences and have just returned from a summer of travelling around China. Like many graduating geoscientists, I’d like to do work that has a positive impact on the world and GfGD has helped to show me how I might be able to do that. I am looking forward to getting more involved with the charity through these blog posts and hope not only to enlighten others, but to learn myself about the interface between geoscience and international development.

I love spending time outdoors – I enjoy hiking and play rugby regularly. I also travel as much as I can; I have been accused by family of only studying Earth Sciences for the travel opportunities it brings, but in truth this is just one of the many perks of studying this versatile subject.

How did you become involved with GfGD?

I attended the Geology for Global Development annual conference last year, and was really inspired by the talks, poster session and discussions held there. If anyone is hesitant as to whether or they not they should attend, I highly recommend it [editor: details of 2017 event can be found here!]. The conference demonstrated to me that it was not only possible to have an ethical career using my degree in Earth Sciences but that it is crucial for the geosciences to be considered when undertaking development projects. From there I took a greater interest in international development and the involvement that the geosciences could have. I wanted to get more involved in the work of GfGD, so when I saw their call for volunteers I was quick to sign up and here I am.

What did you do in your Master’s?

In my final year I specialised in climate science, palaeontology and some petrology, although I find the whole spectrum of Earth Sciences interesting and you can expect my posts to cover a wide range of geoscience fields.

My research project was palaeontology based and I confess not particularly development related! The aim of the project was to calculate the lifespan of ammonites from the growth lines on their aptychi (calcitic plates thought to either be the lower jaw structure or opercula of certain species of ammonite). On top of this I looked into the palaeobiology and palaeoecology of ammonites, using oxygen isotopes to estimate the temperature of the water in which these organisms once lived. I enjoyed the research and am considering doing a PhD in the future.

What can we expect your blogs to cover?

I hope to cover a wide range of topics so that I can appeal to the interests of as many people as possible. I am also looking forward to summarising papers covering the geosciences and international development and connecting these with the UN Sustainable Development goals which underpin so much of the work that GfGD does.

An example of an issue I have been reading about recently is sustainable coral reef management and how developing communities can benefit from the sustainable use of the resources that these environments have to offer, for example through tourism. Regional co-operations are popping up in highly affected areas working to protect reef environments but there is still a lot of work to be done to preserve these unique and hugely biodiverse environments and make local people aware of what does and does not damage these sensitive ecosystems. I also have an interest in how best to make vulnerable communities more resilient to disasters, be they earthquakes, tsunamis or hurricanes like those that have been in the headlines these past few weeks.

Plans for the future?

My dream job would be using my knowledge of geoscience in an ethical way to make a positive difference to the world, whilst involving a lot of travel. For now, however, I am more than happy to invest time in writing blogs for this fantastic charity – it is certainly a step in the right direction.

**This article expresses the personal opinions of the author (Heather Britton). These opinions may not reflect an official policy position of Geology for Global Development. **

This guest post was contributed by a scientist, student or a professional in the Earth, planetary or space sciences. The EGU blogs welcome guest contributions, so if you've got a great idea for a post or fancy trying your hand at science communication, please contact the blog editor or the EGU Communications Officer Laura Roberts Artal to pitch your idea.