Missing Maps – A London Event

27 Oct

Information about an external event that may be of interest to some of our readers:

“You are warmly invited to attend the launch of the Missing Maps Project, a collaboration between the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) , the British Red Cross, the American Red Cross, and Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders (MSF) . This exciting project will draw on a massive force of volunteers to create accurate, up-to-date, permanently open source maps of locations vulnerable to disease outbreaks, epidemics, natural disasters and conflict.

This article from the Guardian gives more information about the mapping process, and the aims and the ideals of the project. Also, we have just launched the website, which is at missingmaps.org.

The launch will take place in the John Snow Lecture Theatre at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine on Friday 7th November from 6pm. After registration there will be speakers and a panel discussion followed by a mapping session.

On the evening, we will launch the mapping of a slum in Dhakar, the capital city of Bangladesh. At present, no map of the area exists. Once the base map is completed, local volunteers will be recruited and mobilised in late November to field map the area, in time for an epidemiological survey of the area to take place at the end of the year to asses the health needs of this radically under-served community.

We will also be continuing to map areas of West Africa affected by the Ebola outbreak. This is urgently needed to improve contact tracing and carry out education and prevention programmes.

To register your attendance, please click please click here.

Maps and mapping are a well-established and essential part of disaster response. Having up-to-date, comprehensive maps freely available for immediate use is crucial to the effective direction of resources in emergency response, coordination, and preventative operations. This is the aim of the Missing Maps Project.”

Images of Guatemala (3) – Lahar Deposits at Fuego

24 Oct

1

Lahars at Volcan de Fuego, Guatemala.

This image captures a lahar [mudflow] deposit close to Volcan de Fuego. These deposits are formed when rain mobilises ash and pyroclastic material on the volcano to form a fast moving, powerful mudflow with the ability to transport material including large boulders. As the energy dissipates, the sediment is deposited as we see above.

Difficult to see in this image, but a tragic reality, is that this lahar destroyed a road. This road was a vital piece of infrastructure to allow evacuation from an erupting volcano, and without it many people will find evacuation very difficult. Lahars, alongside pyroclastic flows, are two of the most significant and destructive volcanic hazards associated with Volcan de Fuego.

You can read more about Fuego and its secondary hazards online here.

(Credit: Geology for Global Development, 2014)

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Every Friday we are publishing an image from Guatemala to promote our ‘100 x 100′ fundraising campaign. We are working with students, recent graduates and others in the UK to raise money to support efforts to reduce the impact of volcanic hazards in Guatemala.

Find out more: www.gfgd.org/guatemala

Register your interest: Submit your information here

Images of Guatemala (2) – Pyroclastic Flow Deposits

17 Oct

3

Pyroclastic Flow Deposits close to Volcan de Fuego, Guatemala.

The scale of these deposits, formed in 2012, can be seen against the scale of the person standing in the background [dark line, just above the red shrub]. Pyroclastic flows, alongside lahars, are two of the most significant and destructive volcanic hazards associated with Volcan de Fuego.

You can read more about Fuego and its secondary hazards online here.

(Credit: Geology for Global Development, 2014)

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Every Friday we are publishing an image from Guatemala to promote our ‘100 x 100′ fundraising campaign. We are working with students, recent graduates and others in the UK to raise money to support efforts to reduce the impact of volcanic hazards in Guatemala.

Find out more: www.gfgd.org/guatemala

Register your interest: Submit your information here

Event Reminder: The Lost World of Ladakh

16 Oct

Credit Rupert Wilmot

Ladakh in the 1930s (Credit Rupert Wilmot)

EVENT REMINDER

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THE LOST WORLD OF LADAKH: RECLAIMING THE PAST, SUSTAINING THE FUTURE

Venue: The Geological Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BG.

24 October 2014, 5.30pm – 8.30pm

Tickets (£20) and Registration –  www.geolsoc.org.uk/Lost-world-of-Ladakh

The Geological Society recently co-organised an international conference in Leh, the capital of the historic Himalayan kingdom of Ladakh. Sustainable Resource Development in the Himalayas brought together scientists from the Himalayan nations and around the world, to discuss with policy-makers and community representatives how to develop sustainably the rich and varied resources of the Himalaya, to benefit the local communities and nations to which they belong.

This conference was preceded and followed by an education programme, with interactive classes focusing on topics such as energy efficiency, climate change and natural hazards. Students were encouraged to take personal responsibility for what they can do to help address these challenges, and to act as ambassadors in their communities.

History offers us a valuable tool to understand and plan for development.  The Lost World of Ladakh: Early Photographic Journeys in Indian Himalaya (1931-1934) is a recently published book, profiling the photographs of Rupert Wilmot, a British solider serving in India. These photographs give us a unique opportunity to visualise this region in the 1930s. The ability to contrast such images with images taken 80 years later provides an insight into both environmental and cultural change.

Programme

Nic Bilham, Director of Policy and Communications at The Geological Society, will give a Welcome Address.

Nicky Harman and Roger Bates will talk about their book, THE LOST WORLD OF LADAKH: Photographic Journeys through Indian Himalaya, 1931-1934, and the enthusiasm in Ladakh for reclaiming the culture of the past from archive photographs.

Modeling Landslides in Ladakh, June 2014 (Credit: Geology for Global Development)

Professor Peter Sammonds, Director of the UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster reduction, and Joel Gill, Director of Geology for GlobalDevelopment, will talk about the recent Sustainable Resource Development in the Himalaya conference and students’ education programme (further information available here – www.geolsoc.org.uk/himalaya14).

A panel discussion will include additional regional experts. Dr Mohammad Shamsudduha, a hydrogeologist based at UCL, and Dr Virginie Le Masson, Research Officer at the Overseas Development Institute will share their insights and experiences.

The evening will wind up with drinks and a chance to talk to the contributors. On display there will be an exhibition of photographs from recent work in Ladakh and THE LOST WORLD OF LADAKH: Photographic Journeys through Indian Himalaya, 1931-1934, (Rupert Wilmot, Roger Bates and Nicky Harman, Asian Highlands Perspectives, 2014). A selection of A4-size prints, and copies of the book, will be on sale.

Tickets: £20.

For registration and further information, please visit www.geolsoc.org.uk/Lost-world-of-Ladakh.

The Geological Society is a not-for-profit organisation. All profits raised from this event will go to support the Sustainable Resource Development in the Himalayas conference and associated work.

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