GeoLog

Vienna

In Vienna for the weekend? Here’s a taste of what’s on offer…

In Vienna for the weekend? Here’s a taste of what’s on offer…

The General Assembly has come to an end, with only a few days left to go. Many of the participants will make their way home over the weekend, but if you’ve chosen to stay on for a little longer, then this list of cultural activities and things to do in Vienna might just be the ticket!

Liechtenstein Castle and Seegrotte Mines

Take a train to Mödling and take a bus to visit the former residence of the Prince of Leichtenstein. Then, take a gondola ride through Europe’s largest underground lake in the Seegrotte Mines, a short trip from Burg Leichtenstein.

Vienna’s Ring Tram

Want to tour some of Vienna’s classic sights in style? Why not consider a trip on the Ring Tram, a journey around the beautiful Ringstrasse all day between 10am and 17.30.

Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, Vienna State Opera

For an evening of style why not consider a night at the Vienna State Opera? A performance of Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk – a dramatic and alternative retelling of the story of Shakespeare’s famous anti-heroine is a great chance to experience the picturesque surroundings of the Wien Statsoper

Austrian Dinner Show

Fancy trying some traditional austrian cuisine while enjoying local classical music? Perhaps a dinner show could be for you. Described as  ‘A musical journey from the mountains of Tirol, the charming lakes of the Salzkammergut, and from the romantic Danube Valley to imperial Vienna’, the ticket comes with a three course set menu.

The Spanish Riding School in Vienna

Enjoyed the ‘dancing horses’ at the Olympics in the summer? If yes you’ll enjoy one of Vienna’s most famous attractions; the Spanish Riding School. The stunning white horses and their traditionally dressed riders will perform at 11.00am this Saturday and Sunday (advanced booking recommended). If you’re not into the dressage then you could try a guided tour of the stables or an architectural tour of the beautiful arena.

Spanish Riding School, Winter Riding School arena, Vienna, Austria. (Credit: Wikimedia commons).

Ludwig Reiter Frühlingsmarkt

110 year old shoe manufacturer Ludwig Reiter is throwing open their doors this weekend for a spring market, to celebrate the changing seasons. As well as shopping for that necessary summer fashion and some tasty local food, you can go behind the scenes of the manufacturer to see how shoes have been made here in Vienna for decades

TED Cinema Experience at the English Cinema Haydn

Not had enough science yet this week? Well you are in luck as all this weekend the English Cinema Haydn will be screening some of the best TED talks from around the world for your viewing and intellectual pleasure. Whether you want to re-live one of your favourites or discover new inspiration, you can for the first time experience these talks on the big screen, right here in Vienna.

By Hazel Gibson, Keri McNamara, Kai Boggild, Press Assistants at the EGU General Assembly

At the Assembly 2017: Monday highlights

At the Assembly 2017: Monday highlights

Welcome to the 2017 General Assembly! This is the first full day of sessions and there’s a feast of them to choose from. Every day we’ll be sharing some super sessions and events at EGU 2017 here on GeoLog and you can complement this information with EGU Today, the daily newsletter of the General Assembly.

Of particular importance today is the Union’s Plenary Meeting (UMI0) at 12:15 in Room E1 – it’s a forum for all Assembly attendees to discuss the development of the Union with the Union Council. Seeing as it’s over lunch, a buffet of scrumptious sandwiches and soft drinks will be served at the event.

We also have the NASA-ESA-EGU joint Union-wide session lined up (US2, 13:30–17:15 in E2). In this session, the planetary and space sciences programmes of ESA & NASA and their Earth observation missions, will be discussed. It’s not one to miss! You can also follow the session on Twitter (#EGU17SSE) and catch up with the EGU 2017 webstream.

The conference can be daunting, especially for first time attendees. For tips and tricks on how to navigate the General Assembly and to learn more about the EGU, why not attend SC44: 08:30–10:00/ Room -2.31. Remember you can also consult the first timer’s guide for more information.

There are several short courses kicking off a week of exciting workshops. Kick of your General Assembly week by supercharging your data analysis skills in this hands-on workshop (bring your laptop!) introducing the data science capabilities of Python and Jupyter (SC67: 08:30–10:00 / Room -2.85). Writing papers is a challenge, no matter what career stage you are at. Pick up some tips in the How to get your hydrology paper published – dealing with editors, reviews and revisions course (SC24/HS12.2: 13:30–15:00 / Room -2.61). Instead, if the solid Earth is the focus of research then don’t miss the opportunity to meet the editors of the EGU journal: Solid Earth and Earth Surface Dynamics (SC48) at 13:30–15:00 in Room -2.91.

There are also scintillating scientific sessions throughout the day. Here’s just a sample of what’s on offer:

The Division Medallists from EGU 2016 (Credit: EGU/CNTV)

Today also features four super Medal Lectures, which are sure to be a great source of inspiration:

Finally, remember to take the opportunity to meet your Division’s representatives in the day’s Meet EGU sessions and, if you’re in need of a break, head on over to GeoCinema, where you can kick back and relax with a geoscientific film (10:30–19:00 daily in the GeoCinema Room, 0.90 on the Yellow Level).

EGU 2017: Getting to Vienna, getting to sleep and getting to know the city

EGU 2017: Getting to Vienna, getting to sleep and getting to know the city

With the conference only a few weeks away here is a brief, and by no means comprehensive, introduction of how to get to Vienna and what to do when you’re there!

Getting here

Vienna’s International Airport is served by many of the major European airlines. If you would like to consider overland you’ll find more information on the General Assembly website. And, if you haven’t seen it already, make sure you check out the General Assembly guide, which is full of even more hints and tips on how to get to Vienna and get ready for the conference.

Getting to sleep

An abundance of accommodation options can be found on the EGU 2017 website. But if you’re not a fan of hotels, there are a variety of alternatives in Vienna. Here are a few examples!

If you’re looking for a low cost option, there are a host of hostels in Vienna, just check these sites:

And, if you’d like to feel more at home, or stay in a flat with fellow geoscientists, you can consider the apartments available in Vienna:

Getting to know Vienna

Vienna’s Prater Park. Credit: Andreallrns, Wikimendia Commons

The Vienna tourist board has all you need to know about sightseeing, shows, shopping, dining and other information about Vienna and you can top this information up with this list of the city’s museums.

Tourist information offices can be found in the Arrivals Hall of Vienna International Airport or at the Tourist Information Centre, which sits behind the Vienna State Opera (the Tourist Information Centre is open daily 09:00-19:00 and you can access it from the U-bahn stop Albertinaplatz/Maysedergasse). Additionally, there is another tourist information office located in the main train station, the Hauptbahnhof, also accessible on the U-bahn. It is also open Mon- Sun from 09:00-19:00.

If you’ve been before and can recommend a good spot for dinner, or something to do when you have a little down time, feel free to make suggestions in the comments!

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 23 to 28 April. Check out the full session programme, for a complete list of short courses available, on the General Assembly website.

EGU 2017: How to make the most of your time at the General Assembly without breaking the bank

EGU 2017: How to make the most of your time at the General Assembly without breaking the bank

Attending a conference is not cheap, even if you’ve been lucky enough to secure some funds to help with travel, accommodation and/or registration costs. However, with a little insider knowledge from those who’ve attended the General Assembly many times before, it is possible to have a (scientifically) rewarding week in Vienna, without breaking the bank.

Before you get there

A sure way to save a few cents (or pennies) is to book your accommodation and travel early. With over 13,000 participants at the conference last year, the race for places to stay and transport to get to Vienna is fierce. Booking early will not only mean you have more choice of places to stay and times to travel, but will ensure you get the most competitive prices too.

For those travelling by plane to the conference, a top tip is to look for flights to Bratislava. The Slovakian capital is only 80km away from Vienna and well connected via bus, train and even boat! Bratislava airport is served by a good selection of low cost airlines and it’s often cheaper to fly there than directly to Vienna. A bus ticket between the two cities can cost as little as one Euro (if booked well in advance) with the average for a return train trip being around 14 euro. If that’s not enough to persuade you, it’s worth factoring in a little time to discover the city. It’s a warren of quaint little streets, an imposing castle and good, affordable beer and food.

Bratislava Old Town. Credit: Xlibber (distributed via Wikimedia Commons)

If you’d rather head straight to Vienna, booking your arrival and departure for the day(s) before and after the conference can result in considerable savings. And, if you’re ok with longer journeys, you might consider the train or the bus, which are often more affordable too.

Somewhere to stay

Sharing accommodation is an easy way to keep costs down. If you are travelling with colleagues consider sharing with them. If you are traveling on your own, or unable to share with colleagues, reach out to contacts you made in the past, be it a former undergrad friend, or someone you met during a workshop. They may not be in your immediate field anymore, but it might offer added bonuses like the option to reconnect and forge new links.

Hotels can be expensive. Hostels offer an affordable alternative and are bound to be packed with fellow EGU goers. Alternatively, look for beds, rooms and/or apartments via Couchsurfing, AirBnB or similar services.

A week of eating out can take its toll, both on the purse strings and on the waistline! Opt for accommodation options which have kitchenettes or full kitchens. You’ll be able to prepare some meals at your home from home, saving a little cash. Plus, you might even have enough space to entertain old friends and potential new collaborators!

Exploring Vienna

If you need a breather from all the science (and the ECS Lounge isn’t enough), or you have a few days before or after the conference to discover the Austrian capital, keep in mind that the city’s public transport is excellent. Staying outside of the city centre guarantees cheaper accommodation prices, but staying along the U1 underground (ubahn) line ensure quick and easy access to all the main tourist spots and the conference centre to boot!

If you’d rather opt for a more energetic option, then the city’s bike rental scheme might be just the ticket. You need to register for the scheme before you can use the bikes, but with 120 stations across the city, and a 4 hour rental costing 4 Euros, this an environmentally friendly and cheap option definitely worth considering.

Vienna has plenty to offer, from beautiful parks and gardens, through to impressive architecture and a plethora of museums (and sachertorte, of course). Visit Wien Null for a great selection of tips on how to enjoy the city to the full, without breaking the bank. The site has information about arts and culture events, free wifi spots, the best places to go for a bite to eat or a drink, as well as a selection of affordable sport options too.

Vienna Cathedral. Credit: Domeckopol (distributed via pixabay.com)

You should also stay tuned to the blog on the final day of the conference. Our team of press assistants put together a blog post highlighting what’s on in Vienna over the weekend. So if you plan to extend your trip to after the conference, you’ll certainly be able to pick up some pointers. Let last year’s post serve as a starting point.

Finding funding

If your research budget won’t stretch to financing a trip to the General Assembly, don’t despair, there are a number of options you can consider. Though it might be a little late to apply for these for the upcoming conference, keep them in mind for the 2018 edition instead.

Submit your abstract to the conference between October and December and you can apply for financial support to travel to the General Assembly (from the EGU). Grants are competitive, but that doesn’t mean one shouldn’t try- if you want to apply, make sure you follow the criteria carefully, as the evaluation is based on how well you satisfy them. You can also consider participating in the EGU’s OSPP Awards, Imaggeo Photo Contest and Communicate your Science Video Competition (submissions for the 2017 editions of all contests are now closed). Not only will it give your CV a boost if you win, it’ll ensure free registration to the following year’s conference.

Many institutions also offer travel support, especially if you are presenting. Seek advice from your advisor and/or the graduate school (if your institute has one) to learn more about what funds are available. Also, find out if your institute/university is a member of Research Professional, which includes a database of all funding options available, no matter how small, including travel grants.

Similarly, there might be schemes available at the national level, be it from funding bodies or directly from the government. They often fall under the ‘short research stay’ category.

Learned societies, e.g. Institute for Civil Engineering, Institution of Engineering & Technology, often have pots of money set aside to support travel to conferences. They sometimes require you to have been a member for a set amount of time before you can apply for support, but there are many benefits to joining, so it’s a worthy investment.

For more tips and tricks, particularly if you’ve never been to the conference before, don’t forget to check our First Timer’s Guide. While we hope this post goes some way toward making the conference an affordable experience, it is by no means comprehensive.Help us make it better by sharing your suggestions on how to make the most of the General Assembly and Vienna, we’d love to hear from you. Add them in the comments section below and we’ll include them in a similar post in 2018.

By Laura Roberts Artal, EGU Communications Officer, & the EGU’s Early Career Representatives

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 23 to 28 April. Check out the full session programme on the General Assembly website.

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: