GeoLog

survey

GeoPolicy: Have your say on Horizon 2020

GeoPolicy: Have your say on Horizon 2020

The European Union provides almost 75 billion euros of funding through the Horizon 2020 scheme. This money can fund research projects, studentships, post-doctorates and scientific outreach (to name but a few!). The EU is now calling for feedback and comments about the scheme. This month’s GeoPolicy explains how you can have your say.

 

Are you a PhD student funded by European Research Council (ERC) or have you received grants from the ERC? If so, this money will have come from the Horizon 2020 (H2020) scheme, funded by the European Union (EU).

Essentially, H2020 provides financial support to scientists and businesses wishing to establish projects that overlap with the EU’s policy objectives (promoting excellent science that benefits society). H2020 was introduced in more detail in a previous GeoPolicy post entitled ‘An overview of EU funding for the Earth, atmosphere, and space sciences’. The scheme runs from 2014 to 2020. Now, at this halfway stage, the EU requesting feedback through an online survey.

The objective of the consultation is to collect information from a wide audience on different aspects of the implementation of the Joint Undertakings operating under Horizon 2020.

The survey is open to all and feedback will be used to improve the second half of H2020 and to support discussions currently being conducted on the next EU funding project: FP9 (Framing Programme 9, 2021-2030).

Contributions are particularly sought from researchers, industry, entrepreneurs, innovators and all types of organisations that have participated in Horizon 2020 and in calls for proposals published by the Joint Undertakings in particular.

So, if you have been part of the H2020 process then consider completing the survey. Deadline for complete is the 10th March 2017.

LINK TO SURVEY

 

NB: Applying for ERC research grants is done through the EU Participant Portal. More details about the process can be found here.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Friends in the field

Out in the field you encounter all sorts of wildlife and while mosquitos are the most frequent (and most unwelcome), they generally don’t interfere with your equipment or your data. The same can’t be said for all animals though, and many scientists have to strap their equipment out of reach, barricade it with barbed fences or place it in a relatively indestructible black box. It’s a particular problem when you need to head back to the lab or lecture theatre, and leave your equipment alone to collect precious scientific data remotely.

Animals can also cause a ruckus when you’re on site – after all, what’s more exciting than a geoscientist and their portable laboratory? This is surely the question that played on the minds of these bovine beasties before interfering with a geoelectrical survey, a method used to monitor CO2 storage and map groundwater.

Does it work? (Credit: Robert Supper, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Does it work? (Credit: Robert Supper, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

While surveying groundwater in Salzburg, Austria, Robert Supper caught a crowd of curious cows taking a closer look at his equipment. “During the measurements on a meadow, we were inspected by a drove of cows, which immediately started to taste electrodes and cables,” he explains.

“On geoelectrical surveys in rural areas, we often encounter an interesting phenomenon: cows or sheep completely ignore us until we finish the installation of cables and electrodes. As soon as we are ready and want to start the measurements, they start to inspect everything, sniff on the equipment, nibble on the cables, stumble over the profile or (worst case) shit on it. If everything was tested correctly by them, they disappear,” Supper adds. Take care when you’re working in a rural area, you might just get some company.

By Sara Mynott, EGU Communications Officer

If you are pre-registered for the 2014 General Assembly (Vienna, 27 April – 2 May), you can take part in our annual photo competition! Up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: