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natural hazards

New Dimensions for Natural Hazards in Asia: the first AOGS–EGU Joint Conference

New Dimensions for Natural Hazards in Asia: the first AOGS–EGU Joint Conference

Asia is one of the most natural disaster-prone regions on the globe. Overpopulation and limited resources mean that natural hazards hit local populations particularly hard.

“It doesn’t matter which index or evaluation method you use, Asia will always unfortunately come out on top when it comes to fatalities and damage from natural hazard events,” explains Dr. Adam Switzer, a member of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee.

To provide a global platform, which brings together participants from across the world and addresses the challenges which need to be unraveled, as well as the potential solutions, the Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS) and EGU have partner to host their very first joint meeting.

With Taal Volcano as the spectacular backdrop, students, early career and established scientists will gather in the Philippines from the 4th to 8th February 2018, to discuss current advances in knowledge and new perspectives relevant to natural hazards in the Asian region.

“We hope that this conference will be a fundamental new step to addressing some of the most pressing hazard problems in the region by bringing together some of the world’s top hazard practitioners in the physical, social and political sciences,” goes on to say Switzer.

The meeting will boast an innovative format, with the organisers actively sidestepping the tradition conference triple Ss: sections, sessions and silos. Instead, the programme is arranged in a series of themes which, through panels, discussion groups, networking and poster introductions, will explore seven overarching topics: from natural hazards in the megacity, to multi-hazard interactions, right through to the transient and long-term effects of catastrophic perturbations.

Niels Hovius, also of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee, adds: “we strive for a programme that explores the connectivity between processes, cause and effect, a programme that acknowledges the fact that many natural disasters have an important time dynamic, lasting much longer than the initial impact.”

The conference abstract submission is currently open, so if your research falls within one of the conference themes, consider contributing to the meeting. But hurry! Abstract submission closes on 31st August 2017.

As well as discussing and sharing advances in natural hazards science, conference participants will get the opportunity to experience the impacts of natural hazards first hand.

The Philippines is, unfortunately, rich with natural hazards and as such provides a wealth of opportunity to investigate the physical, social and economic aspects of numerous natural hazards through a series of conference field trips.  

“The recent earthquake in Bohol, the 1991 Pinatubo eruption and the devastation and recovery from 2013 Typhoon Haiyan are all part of the field program,” highlights Switzer.

Not only that, the conference takes place in a sought-after location, by tourists and locals alike. The Taal Vista Hotel is deeply rooted in the heritage of Tagaytay City. Overlooking Lake Taal, with views which stretch out over Taal volcano, it is also only a little over an hour away from the bustling city of Manila.

“There are a large range of very affordable to more luxurious accommodations available in Tagatay, although early booking is encouraged as the area is a popular one for tourism due to its environmental beauty,” points out Bruce Malamud, of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee.

The AOGS-EGU conference is accessible and affordable for both early career and more senior researchers from around the globe. It hopes to bring together the international research community, with the scientific programme, as well as its spectacular setting, suited to natural hazard scholars and practitioners alike.

The Executive Organizing Committee also hopes that its appeal will transcend the geosciences and that the meeting’s themes will attract those dealing with other aspects of natural disasters: medics, planners, managers, educators and more.

“It is important that we have dialogues that reach beyond the confines of our disciplines,” says Hovius, “For me, this conference will be an opportunity to see some iconic sites, but also to make contacts with local researchers who may be interested in joining international projects targeting multi-hazards, transient response and anomalous events.”

Visit the conference website for all the meeting details. Among the website pages you’ll find information about the conference themes, abstract submission requirements and an overview of the meeting programme. Early bird registrations (until 23rd November 2017) receive a heavily discounted rate, as do AOGS and EGU members. Students also benefit from reduced registration fees.

The website is also packed with logistical information, from details about the conference venue, through to what you can expect to eat, see and do in Tagaytay City. You can also find out if you require a visa for travel to the Philippines and what to do if you are a national of a non-visa exempt country.

By Laura Roberts (EGU Communications Officer) in collaboration with the AOGS–EGU Joint Conference Executive Organizing Committee

For inquiries about the conference please contact Meeting Matters International (nathazards@meetmatt.net). Further contact information is available on the Joint Conference website. You can also receive updates about the conference on Facebook.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Salt shoreline of the Dead Sea

Imaggeo on Mondays: Salt shoreline of the Dead Sea

This beautiful aerial image (you’d be forgiven for thinking that it was a watercolour) of the Dead Sea was captured by a drone flying in 100m altitude over its eastern coastline.

Climate change is seeing temperatures rise in the Middle East, and the increased demand for water in the region (for irrigation) mean the areas on the banks of the lake are suffering a major water shortage. As a result, the lake is shrinking at an alarming rate. Currently, it is shrinking by over 1m/year. The image was captured as part of a survey in the wider project DESERVE (Kottmeier et al. 2016) addressing the environmental changes accompanying the lake level drop.

In this case, the special focus is to look for e.g. submarine springs or other geomorphological evidence in the shallow lake water that can later turn into hazardous sinkholes (cf. recent publication on that topic Al-Halbouni et. al. 2017). Learn more about the environmental challenges and geohazard risks the region faces in this December 2016 Imaggeo on Mondays post.

The round features see in this image, nevertheless have been identified as salt accumulations following basically the sinusoidal shoreline.

The different colours of the lake indicate water of varying densities, e.g. fresh water floating on top of saltier water and possible sediments inside.

The shoreline appears with different colours each year depending on the sediment mud & evaporite material. Each line represents the retreat of a given year!

[Editor’s note: this image was a finalsit in the 2017 Imaggeo Photo Contest]

By Laura Robert and Djamil Al-Halbouni of the German Research Center for Geosciences, Physics of the Earth, Potsdam, German

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

 

Imaggeo on Mondays: a storm is coming

Imaggeo on Mondays: a storm is coming

Coastlines globally are immensely diverse: from the beautifully topical and sun kissed beaches of the Caribbean, to the wet and misty British coastline, through to the raw and wild Alaskan shores, they are home to scores of flora and fauna; rich habitats shaped by powerful forces of nature.

In stark contrast, some coastlines, (28,000 km worldwide to be precise) are dry almost barren places, where little grows. These long stretches of inhospitable seaside lands are known as hyperarid and arid coastlines. Due to the lack of protective vegetation the land is exposed to the action of winds and the sun, leaving behind pavements of bare rock, large dune formations and/or highly saline enclosed lakes (sebkhas).

The Gulf of Aqaba, in the north-western tip of Saudi Arabia, where the desert meets the Red Sea is one such place. Rivers here, which drain into the sea water, are fleeting. They appear after heavy rainfall, when flash floods deliver huge influxes of sediment to the coral-rich waters of the Red Sea.

Nadine Hoffman took today’s featured image while driving from Israel from the Red Sea. Pictured is the northern tip of Saudi Arabia, where a spring storm is coming into the desert bringing severe rain and flash floods. Eventually, the flood waters will drain into the Gulf of Aqaba.

 

If you pre-register for the 2017 General Assembly (Vienna, 22 – 28 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly! These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

January GeoRoundup: the best of the Earth sciences from across the web

January Georoundup: the best of the Earth sciences from across the web

The start of the new year sees the launch of a new series here on GeoLog. Drawing inspiration from popular stories on our social media channels, as well as unique and quirky research news, this monthly column aims to bring you the best of the Earth and planetary sciences from around the web.

Major stories

One of the biggest stories of this month was the anticipated release of the average global surface temperatures for 2016. It probably wasn’t a great surprise to discover that newly released National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NASA and the UK’s MetOffice data showed 2016 was the hottest year on record. On average, temperatures last year were 0.99℃ higher than the mid-century mean. It marks the third year in a row that Earth has registered record-breaking temperatures and highlights a trend, as climate blogger, Dana Nuccitelli, explains in an article for The Guardian:

“We’re now breaking global temperature records once every three years”

This video, showing NASA global surface temperature record since 1880, illustrates the point clearly. There were no record breaking years between 1945 and 1976, but since 1980 there have been 12.

 

This month also saw the inauguration of the 45th President of the United States. A fierce climate-change denier, Donald Trump’s rise to power has many worried about the future of climate change policy at the White House. To shine a light on the realities of climate change in the face of a largely climate sceptic administration and despite the ever rising global temperatures, The Guardian dedicate 24 hours to reporting on how climate changes is affecting regions across the globe. Among the comprehensive coverage this collection of climate facts stands out.

And it turns out the fears about the newly elected administration may not have been unfounded. Earlier this week the US Department of Agriculture and other federal agencies issued a ban preventing its scientists from communicating with the press and public about their research findings; even on social media. The order has since been rescinded, but US- based scientists remain concerned. In response, the AGU has written a letter to federal agencies in the US defending the protection of scientific integrity and open communications.

Closer to home, central Italy was struck by a sequence of four earthquakes on 18th of January, with the largest registering a magnitude of 5.7. The epicentres were located close to the town of Amatrice – in a region already shaken by several strong, and sometimes devastating, earthquakes in 2016. Later that day, and following a period of very heavy snowfall, a deadly avalanche in the Apennines buried a hotel in the Grand Sasso resort area, which had also been affected by the earthquakes. Although some news reports were quick to suggest the avalanche had been triggered by the earthquakes, researchers will need more data and a more detailed analysis to make this connection.

What you might have missed

While we are on the topic of climate change, a newly published report by the  European Environmental Agency is not to be missed.

“Climate change poses increasingly severe risks for ecosystems, human health and the economy in Europe.”

The document assesses the latest trends and projections on climate change and its impacts across Europe. While the effects of increasing temperatures will be felt across the continent, Southern and south-eastern Europe is projected to be a climate change hotspot with the forecasts showing the region will bear the brunt of the impacts.

A powerful 7.9 magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Papua New Guinea on 22nd January. While the USGS estimated there was a low risk to property, tsunami warnings were issued across the South Pacific. In the wake of the tremor, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) tweeted this neat ground motion visualisation of the earthquake waves.

A study published in Nature and summarised in Eos, highlights that while overt discrimination of women in the geosciences has not been as prevalent in recent years, many female scientists are still subject to subtle and unconscious bias leading to barriers to success in the geosciences.

Five links we liked

  • NOAA’s new GOES-R satellite for weather monitoring returned its first stunning photos of planet Earth – here are six reasons why the data it will acquire matter.
  • Snow fell in the Sahara for the first time in 37 years! This photogallery shows the usually red sand dunes of the desert covered in a sprinkling of white snow.
  • Scientist at The University of Cambridge have published the first global map of flow within the Earth’s mantle, showing that the surface moves up & down “like a yo-yo”.

The EGU story

At the EGU, the highlight of the month is the number of abstracts we received from researchers wishing to present and discuss their science at the EGU 2017 General Assembly. With over 17,500 abstracts, and an improved set-up to accommodate the high number of expected participants, the conference promises to be the largest and most exciting to date. We look forward to welcoming everyone in Vienna on 23–28 April!

And don’t forget! To stay abreast of all the EGU’s events and activities, from highlighting papers published in our open access journals to providing news relating to EGU’s scientific divisions and meetings, including the General Assembly, subscribe to receive our monthly newsletter.

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