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At the General Assembly 2017: Thursday highlights

At the General Assembly 2017: Thursday highlights

Welcome to the fourth day of General Assembly excitement! Once again the day is packed with great events for you to attend and here are just some of the sessions on offer. You can find out more about what’s on in EGU Today, the daily newsletter of the General Assembly – grab a copy on your way in or download it here.

The Union-wide session of the day focuses on making facts greats again: how can scientists stand up for science (US3)? The session aims to identify strategies to counter recent attacks on science and brainstorm ways in which scientists can stand-up for science. With a selection of high profile panellists: Christiana Figueres, Sir David King, Heike Langenberg, Christine McEntee and the EGU’s President, Jonathan Bamber as chair person, the session promises to be one of the conference highlights. Join the discussion from 10:30 to 12:00 in room E2.

Thursday also sees two interesting Great Debates taking place: Arctic environmental change: global opportunities and threats (GDB1, from 08:30–10:00 in E2, jointly organised with American Geophysical Union – AGU). While many scientist support open access publishing, is support for open access to the underlying research data as easy to achieve? Join the discussion in GDB4, from 15:30 to 17:00 in room E1. At the same time, in room D1, conference participants can take part in the third Great Debate of the day. The two-way, complex interactions between urban and geophysical systems has been recently recognised as the key question for the fate our planet and the issue of the Anthropocene. How can we transition to next generation cities and planet Earth future?  Tune into to the sessions on Twitter using the #EGU17GDB hashtag or online at http://www.egu2017.eu/webstreaming.html.

Today’s interdisciplinary highlights include sessions on…

Take the opportunity to expand your skills in one of today’s short courses and splinter meetings. Be sure to share what you learn on social media using the hashtag #EGU17SC:

There’s also a number of Medal Lectures on throughout the day – here’s a sample of what’s on offer:

What have you thought of the Assembly so far? Let us know at www.egu2017.eu/feedback, and share your views on what future EGU meetings should be like!

If you need a change of pace, stop by the Imaggeo Photo Exhibition beside the EGU Booth (Hall X2, basement, Brown Level). You can vote for your favourite finalists there and – while you’re in the area – take the opportunity to meet your Division’s representatives in today’s Meet EGU appointments. While on the subject of competitions, make sure to ‘like’ your favourite  Communicate Your Science Video Competition film on the EGU YouTube channel.

Have a lovely day!

GeoPolicy: Have your say on Horizon 2020

GeoPolicy: Have your say on Horizon 2020

The European Union provides almost 75 billion euros of funding through the Horizon 2020 scheme. This money can fund research projects, studentships, post-doctorates and scientific outreach (to name but a few!). The EU is now calling for feedback and comments about the scheme. This month’s GeoPolicy explains how you can have your say.

 

Are you a PhD student funded by European Research Council (ERC) or have you received grants from the ERC? If so, this money will have come from the Horizon 2020 (H2020) scheme, funded by the European Union (EU).

Essentially, H2020 provides financial support to scientists and businesses wishing to establish projects that overlap with the EU’s policy objectives (promoting excellent science that benefits society). H2020 was introduced in more detail in a previous GeoPolicy post entitled ‘An overview of EU funding for the Earth, atmosphere, and space sciences’. The scheme runs from 2014 to 2020. Now, at this halfway stage, the EU requesting feedback through an online survey.

The objective of the consultation is to collect information from a wide audience on different aspects of the implementation of the Joint Undertakings operating under Horizon 2020.

The survey is open to all and feedback will be used to improve the second half of H2020 and to support discussions currently being conducted on the next EU funding project: FP9 (Framing Programme 9, 2021-2030).

Contributions are particularly sought from researchers, industry, entrepreneurs, innovators and all types of organisations that have participated in Horizon 2020 and in calls for proposals published by the Joint Undertakings in particular.

So, if you have been part of the H2020 process then consider completing the survey. Deadline for complete is the 10th March 2017.

LINK TO SURVEY

 

NB: Applying for ERC research grants is done through the EU Participant Portal. More details about the process can be found here.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Hot and cold – how ash influences glacial landscapes

This week’s Imaggeo on Mondays is brought to you by Joanna Nield, a lecturer in physical geography at the University of Southampton. Nield explains how volcanic eruptions can impact glaciers and how ash fall can both accelerate and slow down glacial melt…

“Fjallsjökull after the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption” by Joanna Nield, distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

“Fjallsjökull after the 2011 Grímsvötn eruption” by Joanna Nield, distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

This photo was taken at Fjallsjökull, Iceland in July 2011, shortly after the eruption of Grímsvötn volcano (21 – 30 May 2011).  The Grímsvötn volcanic eruption partially covered many of the surrounding glaciers in a spatially variable layer of tephra ash.

Fjallsjökull (and Hrútárjökull, the smaller lobe on the left of this photo) were south-east of the volcano, exposing them to the dominant wind moving the ash plume and the subsequent ash fall.  We were lucky enough to use terrestrial laser scanning to study the impact on nearby Svínafellsjökull soon after the eruption with funding from the Royal Society – our daily surface measurements showed that shortly after an eruption, ice melt rates could be reduced by as much as 59% compared to clean ice model predictions.

When ash covers an ice surface, it changes the rate that snow and ice is lost from the glacier (the ablation rate).  Dark coloured ash will reduce the albedo (reflectiveness) of the surface, causing it to absorb more heat. This causes an increase in melt rates for thin debris layers, but thick layers of ash insulate the ice and reduce melt.  On top of this, complex feedbacks between debris cover, meltwater and surface shape redistribute ash and change surface roughness – which also influences ablation rates.  It is important to understand these ash-ice interactions as well as feedbacks between the surface and atmosphere to better quantify the impact of volcanic eruptions in glaciated landscapes.

By Joanna Nield, University of Southampton

References:

Nield, J.M., Chiverrell, R.C., Darby, S.E., Leyland, J., Vircavs, L.H., Jacobs, B.:  Complex spatial feedbacks of tephra redistribution, ice melt and surface roughness modulate ablation on tephra covered glaciers. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 38: 95-102, 2013

Nield, J.M., King, J., Wiggs, G.F.S., Leyland, J., Bryant, R.G., Chiverrell, R.C., Darby, S.E., Eckardt, F.D., Thomas, D.S.G., Vircavs, L.H., Washington, R.: Estimating aerodynamic roughness over complex surface terrain.  Journal of Geophysical Research – Atmospheres, 2013

The EGU’s open access geoscience image repository has a new and improved home at http://imaggeo.egu.eu! We’ve redesigned the website to give the database a more modern, image-based layout and have implemented a fully responsive page design. This means the new website adapts to the visitor’s screen size and looks good whether you’re using a smartphone, tablet or laptop.

Photos uploaded to Imaggeo are licensed under Creative Commons, meaning they can be used by scientists, the public, and even the press, provided the original author is credited. Further, you can now choose how you would like to licence your work. Users can also connect to Imaggeo through their social media accounts too! Find out more about the relaunch on the EGU website. 

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