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Help shape the conference programme: Interdisciplinary Events at the 2018 General Assembly

Help shape the conference programme: Interdisciplinary Events at the 2018 General Assembly

Do you enjoy the EGU’s annual General Assembly but wish you could play a more active role in shaping the scientific programme? Now is your chance! But hurry, the session submission deadline is fast approaching. You’ve got until September 8th to propose changes.

As well as the standard scientific sessions, subdivided by Programme Groups, EGU coordinates Interdisciplinary Events (IE) at the conference. Their aim is to foster and facilitate exchange of knowledge across scientific divisions. IE typically tackle a common theme through an interdisciplinary combination of approaches.

The Earth, oceans and even space are interconnected in many different ways; rarely can one system be perturbed without others being affected too.

If interdisciplinarity is important to you and your work, know that you too can co-organise your session as an Interdisciplinary Event. Read on to discover how!

The skeleton programme for the 2018 General Assembly currently features four IE themes:

  • IE1: Life in the Earth system
  • IE2: From palaeo-timescales to future projections
  • IE3: New imaging technologies in the Geosciences
  • IE4: Big data

Sessions within each of these IE themes will be scheduled closely together, to foster cross-division links and collaborations.

To propose a session in one of the planned Interdisciplinary themes, follow these simple steps:

  • Visit the IE pages on the EGU 2018 website
  • Suggest a new session (within one of the four IE themes)
  • Choose a Programme Group that will be the scientific leader. For example, if you choose BG, your session will be listed in the programme as IE/BG
  • Suggest more Programme Groups for co-organisation in the comment box

Wondering whether your session would fit as an IE? Just ask IE Programme Group officers, Peter van der Beek (gm@egu.eu) or Susanne Buiter (programme.committee@egu.eu).

Peter and Susanne, are looking forward to a strong interdisciplinary programme at the 2018 General Assembly. But they need your help to achieve this!

You can also find more information about the call for sessions (and the organisation of the scientific programme in general) on the EGU 2018 website.

The EGU’s 2018 General Assembly, takes place in Vienna from 8 to 13 April, 2018. For more news about the upcoming General Assembly, you can also follow the offical hashtag, #EGU18, on our social media channels.

 

 

New Dimensions for Natural Hazards in Asia: the first AOGS–EGU Joint Conference

New Dimensions for Natural Hazards in Asia: the first AOGS–EGU Joint Conference

Asia is one of the most natural disaster-prone regions on the globe. Overpopulation and limited resources mean that natural hazards hit local populations particularly hard.

“It doesn’t matter which index or evaluation method you use, Asia will always unfortunately come out on top when it comes to fatalities and damage from natural hazard events,” explains Dr. Adam Switzer, a member of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee.

To provide a global platform, which brings together participants from across the world and addresses the challenges which need to be unraveled, as well as the potential solutions, the Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS) and EGU have partner to host their very first joint meeting.

With Taal Volcano as the spectacular backdrop, students, early career and established scientists will gather in the Philippines from the 4th to 8th February 2018, to discuss current advances in knowledge and new perspectives relevant to natural hazards in the Asian region.

“We hope that this conference will be a fundamental new step to addressing some of the most pressing hazard problems in the region by bringing together some of the world’s top hazard practitioners in the physical, social and political sciences,” goes on to say Switzer.

The meeting will boast an innovative format, with the organisers actively sidestepping the tradition conference triple Ss: sections, sessions and silos. Instead, the programme is arranged in a series of themes which, through panels, discussion groups, networking and poster introductions, will explore seven overarching topics: from natural hazards in the megacity, to multi-hazard interactions, right through to the transient and long-term effects of catastrophic perturbations.

Niels Hovius, also of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee, adds: “we strive for a programme that explores the connectivity between processes, cause and effect, a programme that acknowledges the fact that many natural disasters have an important time dynamic, lasting much longer than the initial impact.”

The conference abstract submission is currently open, so if your research falls within one of the conference themes, consider contributing to the meeting. But hurry! Abstract submission closes on 31st August 2017.

As well as discussing and sharing advances in natural hazards science, conference participants will get the opportunity to experience the impacts of natural hazards first hand.

The Philippines is, unfortunately, rich with natural hazards and as such provides a wealth of opportunity to investigate the physical, social and economic aspects of numerous natural hazards through a series of conference field trips.  

“The recent earthquake in Bohol, the 1991 Pinatubo eruption and the devastation and recovery from 2013 Typhoon Haiyan are all part of the field program,” highlights Switzer.

Not only that, the conference takes place in a sought-after location, by tourists and locals alike. The Taal Vista Hotel is deeply rooted in the heritage of Tagaytay City. Overlooking Lake Taal, with views which stretch out over Taal volcano, it is also only a little over an hour away from the bustling city of Manila.

“There are a large range of very affordable to more luxurious accommodations available in Tagatay, although early booking is encouraged as the area is a popular one for tourism due to its environmental beauty,” points out Bruce Malamud, of the conference’s Executive Organizing Committee.

The AOGS-EGU conference is accessible and affordable for both early career and more senior researchers from around the globe. It hopes to bring together the international research community, with the scientific programme, as well as its spectacular setting, suited to natural hazard scholars and practitioners alike.

The Executive Organizing Committee also hopes that its appeal will transcend the geosciences and that the meeting’s themes will attract those dealing with other aspects of natural disasters: medics, planners, managers, educators and more.

“It is important that we have dialogues that reach beyond the confines of our disciplines,” says Hovius, “For me, this conference will be an opportunity to see some iconic sites, but also to make contacts with local researchers who may be interested in joining international projects targeting multi-hazards, transient response and anomalous events.”

Visit the conference website for all the meeting details. Among the website pages you’ll find information about the conference themes, abstract submission requirements and an overview of the meeting programme. Early bird registrations (until 23rd November 2017) receive a heavily discounted rate, as do AOGS and EGU members. Students also benefit from reduced registration fees.

The website is also packed with logistical information, from details about the conference venue, through to what you can expect to eat, see and do in Tagaytay City. You can also find out if you require a visa for travel to the Philippines and what to do if you are a national of a non-visa exempt country.

By Laura Roberts (EGU Communications Officer) in collaboration with the AOGS–EGU Joint Conference Executive Organizing Committee

For inquiries about the conference please contact Meeting Matters International (nathazards@meetmatt.net). Further contact information is available on the Joint Conference website. You can also receive updates about the conference on Facebook.

Cartooning science at EGU 2017 with Matthew Partridge (a.k.a Errant Science)

Cartooning science at EGU 2017 with Matthew Partridge (a.k.a Errant Science)

Most researchers are regular conference-goers. Tell a geoscientist you are attending the EGU General Assembly and they will most likely picture rooms full of people listening to a miriad of talks, many an hour chatting to colleagues old and new and you desperately trying to find your way around the maze that is the Austria Centre Vienna (where the conference is held). Describing your experiences to others (not so familiar with the conference set-up) can be a lot more tricky.

Cue Matthew Partridge, author of Errant Science, a blog which features (~) weekly cartoons and posts about the world of research.

With the aim to demystify what happens during a week-long conference, Matthew set himself the challenge of keeping a daily diary of his time at the 2017 General Assembly. As if that weren’t a tall enough order, the posts feature not only a witty take on his time in Vienna, but also cartoons! Whilst battling a huge sense of ‘impostor syndrome‘ (Matthew’s words, not ours), Matthew’s daily posts bring the conference to life.

With Errant Science (Matthew’s twitter alter ego is possibly better know) at the conference, we couldn’t pass up the opportunity of speaking to him. Video camera in hand, our press assistant, Kai Boggild, talked with Matthew about his motivations for blogging about the conference and that badger cartoon.

If you didn’t read Matthew’s posts while the conference was taking place in April, grab a coffee and get comfortable, they should be enjoyed repeatedly!

In Vienna for the weekend? Here’s a taste of what’s on offer…

In Vienna for the weekend? Here’s a taste of what’s on offer…

The General Assembly has come to an end, with only a few days left to go. Many of the participants will make their way home over the weekend, but if you’ve chosen to stay on for a little longer, then this list of cultural activities and things to do in Vienna might just be the ticket!

Liechtenstein Castle and Seegrotte Mines

Take a train to Mödling and take a bus to visit the former residence of the Prince of Leichtenstein. Then, take a gondola ride through Europe’s largest underground lake in the Seegrotte Mines, a short trip from Burg Leichtenstein.

Vienna’s Ring Tram

Want to tour some of Vienna’s classic sights in style? Why not consider a trip on the Ring Tram, a journey around the beautiful Ringstrasse all day between 10am and 17.30.

Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, Vienna State Opera

For an evening of style why not consider a night at the Vienna State Opera? A performance of Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk – a dramatic and alternative retelling of the story of Shakespeare’s famous anti-heroine is a great chance to experience the picturesque surroundings of the Wien Statsoper

Austrian Dinner Show

Fancy trying some traditional austrian cuisine while enjoying local classical music? Perhaps a dinner show could be for you. Described as  ‘A musical journey from the mountains of Tirol, the charming lakes of the Salzkammergut, and from the romantic Danube Valley to imperial Vienna’, the ticket comes with a three course set menu.

The Spanish Riding School in Vienna

Enjoyed the ‘dancing horses’ at the Olympics in the summer? If yes you’ll enjoy one of Vienna’s most famous attractions; the Spanish Riding School. The stunning white horses and their traditionally dressed riders will perform at 11.00am this Saturday and Sunday (advanced booking recommended). If you’re not into the dressage then you could try a guided tour of the stables or an architectural tour of the beautiful arena.

Spanish Riding School, Winter Riding School arena, Vienna, Austria. (Credit: Wikimedia commons).

Ludwig Reiter Frühlingsmarkt

110 year old shoe manufacturer Ludwig Reiter is throwing open their doors this weekend for a spring market, to celebrate the changing seasons. As well as shopping for that necessary summer fashion and some tasty local food, you can go behind the scenes of the manufacturer to see how shoes have been made here in Vienna for decades

TED Cinema Experience at the English Cinema Haydn

Not had enough science yet this week? Well you are in luck as all this weekend the English Cinema Haydn will be screening some of the best TED talks from around the world for your viewing and intellectual pleasure. Whether you want to re-live one of your favourites or discover new inspiration, you can for the first time experience these talks on the big screen, right here in Vienna.

By Hazel Gibson, Keri McNamara, Kai Boggild, Press Assistants at the EGU General Assembly

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