GeoLog

GeoLog

Imaggeo on Mondays: littoral rainforests

Littoral rainforests

Seagull lunch. Credit: Alicia Morugán (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu).

Making room for growing populations, and the resources they demand, comes at the cost of precious natural environments. Rainforests, globally, are under threat from farming, logging and ever expanding cities. It is reported that if current rates of exploitation continue, the world’s rainforests could be lost within the next century.

Like almost anything else, rainforests come in all shapes and sizes. Typically, rainforests are depicted as lush, jungle-like concentrations of tall trees characterised by heavy rainfalls. But, perhaps unexpectedly, stretches of the coastline in eastern Australian are also peppered by rainforest. Because of their proximity to the ocean, these closed-canopy forests – where  approximately 70% of the sky obscured by tree leaves and limbs – are known as littoral rainforests.

Much like their equatorial cousins, Australian littoral rainforests are under threat. Large swathes of forest have been destroyed for/by agriculture, animal browsing/grazing, fire, mining or housing. Invasive species and weeds pose a particular danger to the forests too.

Today’s featured image was taken from “The Brunswick Heads Nature Reserve, a protected nature reserve located in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales, Australia. The 221-hectare (550-acre) reserve is situated near Brunswick Heads and contains an intact segment of littoral rainforest,” writes Alicia Morugán, author of the photograph.

The reserve is home to many critically endangered rainforest plants that are either at the southern limit of their distribution or not found in many other places in New South Wales, as well as many threatened animal species. Current conservation efforts center around monitoring to identify key threats to the precious ecosystems, as well as protecting known sites.

 

If you pre-register for the 2017 General Assembly (Vienna, 22 – 28 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

 

A first-timer’s guide to the 2017 General Assembly

A first-timer’s guide to the 2017 General Assembly

Will this be your first time at an EGU General Assembly? With 13,650 participants in a massive venue, the conference can be a confusing and, at times, overwhelming place.

To help you find your way, we have compiled an introductory handbook filled with history, presentation pointers, travel tips and a few facts about Vienna and its surroundings. Download your copy of the EGU General Assembly guide here!

Announcing the winner of the EGU Best Blog Post of 2016 Competition

Announcing the winner of the EGU Best Blog Post of 2016 Competition

There is no doubt that 2016 was packed full of exciting, insightful and informative blog posts. An impressive 360 posts were published across the EGU’s official blog, GeoLog, as well as the network and division blogs!

In December, to celebrate the excellent display of science writing across the network and division blogs, we launched the EGU Blogs competition. From a list of posts selected by our blog editors, we invited you, the EGU Blogs readers, to vote for your favourite post of 2016. After a little over three weeks of voting, the winners are finally in!

Without further ado, we’d like to extend a big congratulations to the Cryosphere Blog, who take this year’s crown, with a 58% share of the votes, for their post following the journey of a snowflake! From the water vapour in a cloud to the snowman in your garden, find out what leads to the complex structure you can see on in the image below!

Snowflakes viewed with a low temperature scanning electron microscope (SEM). [ Image Credit : Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture via Wikimedia]

All the posts entered into the competition are worthy of a read too, so head over to the poll and click on the post titles to learn about a variety of topics: from the fate of Fukushima Iodine-129 in rain and groundwater, to exploring whether letters of recommendation are the key to the leaky pipeline in academia and how common soft sediment structures like slumps and flames form.

If the start of a new year, with its inevitable resolutions, along with the range and breadth of posts across the EGU Blogs have inspired you to try your hand at a little science writing then remember all the EGU Blogs welcome (and encourage!) guest posts.  Indeed, it is the variety of guest posts, in addition to regular features, which makes the blogs a great read! If you would like to contribute to any of the network, divison blogs or GeoLog, please send a short paragraph detailing your idea to the EGU Communications Officer, Laura Roberts at networking@egu.eu.

 

Imaggeo on Mondays: the remotest place on Earth?

Imaggeo on Mondays: the remotest place on Earth?

Perhaps a bold claim, but at over 4,000 km away from Australia and 4,200 km from South Africa, Heard Island is unquestionably hard to reach.

The faraway and little know place is part of a group of volcanic islands known as HIMI (comprised of the Heard Island and McDonald Islands), located in the southwest Indian Ocean. Shrouded in persistent bad weather and surrounded by the vast ocean, Heard Island, the largest of the group, was first sighted by the merchant vessel Oriental in 1853.

Its late discovery and inaccessibility mean Heard Island is largely undisturbed by human activity (some research, surveillance, fishing and shipping take place on the island and it’s surrounding waters). It boasts a rich fauna and flora: seals, invertebrates, birds and seals call it home, as do hardy species of vegetation which grow low to the ground to avoid the fierce winds which batter the island.

Geologically speaking the islands are pretty unique too. They are the surface exposure of the second largest submarine plateau in the world, the Kerguelen Plateau. Limestones deposited some 45–50 million years ago began the process which saw the emergence of the islands from the ocean floor. Ancient volcanic activity followed, accumulating volcanic materials,  such as pillow lavas and volcanic sediments, up to 350m thick. For the last million years (or less) Heard Island has been dominated by volcanism, giving rise to the 2745m tall Big Ben and 700m tall Mt. Dixon. Eruptions and volcanic events have been observed on the island since 1947. Much of the recent volcanism in the region has centered around McDonald island, which has grown 40 km in area and 100 m in height since the 1980s.   

As the group of islands provides a remarkable setting, where geological processes and evolution (given that large populations of marine birds and mammals numbering in the millions, but low species diversity) can be observed in in real time, UNESCO declared HIMI a World Heritage Site back in 1997.

If you pre-register for the 2017 General Assembly (Vienna, 22 – 28 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

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