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EGU 2015: Get the Assembly mobile app!

The EGU 2015 mobile app is now available for iPhones and Android smartphones. To download it, you can scan the QR code available at the General Assembly website or go directly to http://app.egu2015.eu on your mobile device. You will be directed to the version of the EGU 2015 app for your particular smartphone, which you can download for free.

Once you open the app, the dashboard will show you four possibilities: you can browse and search the meeting programme, select presentations to be added to your own personal programme, and find out more about the General Assembly on Twitter. From here you can also access EGU Today: the daily newsletter at the General Assembly, highlighting interesting conference papers, medal lectures, workshops, GeoCinema events among many others! Just click on the button on the bottom right to download the electronic PDF version of each edition of the newsletter.

  Spot the difference! The dashboard on the iPhone and Android app.


Spot the difference! The dashboard on the iPhone and Android app. Click on the image to enlarge.

The icon in the top left takes you to the main menu, where you can read more about the Assembly, and if you find yourself lost in the conference centre, there are floor plans to show you the way:

The mobile app main menu.

The iPhone (left) and Android (right) app main menu. Click on the image to enlarge.

You can browse the meeting programme by selecting “Browse” (also accessible from the dashboard), and choose a session or group of sessions (example, Short Courses, SC) for a list of talks including title, date, time and location. The coloured square indicates in what level the room is located (Blue Level – Basement, Green Level – First Floor, etc.).

Browsing Short Courses on the iPhone (left) and Android (right) app.

Browsing Short Courses on the iPhone (left) and Android (right) app. Click on the image to enlarge.

By clicking on a listed talk, you can find more information about the presentation in question. To add an oral or poster presentation to your personal programme (accessible from the dashboard or side menu), simply click on the star on the top right corner of the description. You can also add it to your phone calendar by turning the “In Calendar” button on.

Session details listed in the iPhone and Android app.

Session details listed in the iPhone (left) and Android (right) app. Click on the image to enlarge.

Presentations already added to your personal programme will be listed with a yellow star. Simply click on the yellow star again to remove it. You can synchronise this information with your online personal programme by selecting the icon in the top right corner of your programme. This will let you access the same information from the EGU 2015 website.

Create your own personal programme using the mobile app.

Create your own personal programme using the mobile app. Click on the image to enlarge.

For what’s going on during – and in the lead up to – the Assembly, select the Twitter icon from the dashboard. If you are unfamiliar with Twitter, this is essentially a news feed for the General Assembly, where you can follow what’s going on in real-time, see what sessions other people recommend and ask questions of Assembly participants. To ask a question or highlight a great session, simply click on the bird (iPhone) or share icon (Android). All tweets are automatically tagged with #EGU15 so they will be added to the conference Twitter feed.

We hope you enjoy the app and the conference, see you in Vienna!

GeoEd: Education vs. Communication

Sci_Comm_Header

Van for Pacific Science Center school visits. Credit: Arthur Hu (Wiarthurhu) distributed via Wikipedia.com

In this guest blog post, Sam Illingworth, discusses the perceived differences between science education and science communication in light of a recent publication on this very subject. If you are involved in either of these, we’d love to hear your opinions on how you think they differ (if at all) and how the approach to engaging the public might differ too! We look forward to your comments.

The Journal of Research in Science Teaching recently published this extremely interesting special issue on Bridging Science Education and Science Communication Research. The issue is worth reading in its entirety, but it is a discussion of the editorial and some of the issues that are raised in it that I would like to discuss in this GeoEd post.
[Read More]

Communicate Your Science Video Competition at EGU 2015!

Want to communicate your research to a wider audience and try your hand at video production? Now’s your chance! Young scientists pre-registered for the EGU General Assembly are invited to take part in the EGU’s Communicate Your Science Video Competition!

The aim is to produce a video up-to-three-minutes long to share your research with the general public. The winning entry will receive a free registration to the General Assembly in 2016.

Your video can include scenes of you out in the field and explaining an outcrop, or at the lab bench showing how to work out water chemistry; entries can also include cartoons, animations (including stop motion), or music videos – you name it! As long as you’re explaining concepts in the Earth, planetary and space sciences in a language suitable for a general audience, you can be as creative as you like.

Why not take a look at the finalists and winner of the 2014 competition for an idea of what makes a winning entry?

Feeling inspired? Send your video to Laura Roberts (roberts@egu.eu) by 4 March, together with proof of online pre-registration to EGU 2015. Check the EGU website for more information about the competition and pre-register for the conference on the EGU 2015 website

Shortlisted videos will be showcased on the EGU YouTube Channel in April, when voting opens! In the run up to the General Assembly and during the conference, viewers can vote for their favourite film by clicking on the video’s ‘like’ button. The winning video will be the one with the most likes by the end of the General Assembly.

What are you waiting for? Take the chance to showcase your research and spread great geoscientific facts with the world!

 

Connecting Earth scientists and school students – Apply to take part in I’m a Geoscientist!

What and when

Imagine a talent show where contestants get voted off depending on their skills in their area of choice. Then imagine that this talent show is populated by scientists with school students voting them off based on the scientist’s ability to communicate their research well. This is the basis of a recent EGU educational initiative that launched earlier in 2014, and that will return in 2015.

The EGU are continuing their collaboration with Gallomanor, the UK company in charge of I’m a Scientist (Get me out of here) and I’m an Engineer (Get me out of here), to run the European-wide sister project I’m a Geoscientist. The event provides school students with the opportunity to meet and interact with real (geo)scientists!I'm a geoscientist

The event takes the form of an online chat forum using an innovative online platform. School students log on and post questions to the scientists taking part, querying them on everything (with moderation) from their research to their favourite music. The scientists then log on and answer those questions. Based on their answers (e.g. on how well they’ve explained a particular piece of science), students get to vote out scientists until there is one left – the best scientific communicator – who wins €500 for a new public-engagement project of their choice.

The primary objective of the event is to change students’ attitudes to the geosciences and make them feel it’s something they can relate to and discuss in a rapidly changing world. Students have fun, but also get beyond stereotypes, learn about how science relates to real life, develop their thinking and discussion skills and make connections with real scientists. Giving students some real power (deciding where the prize money goes) also makes the event more real for them. The student who interacts the most with scientists and asks the most insightful questions will also win a €20 gift voucher.

I'm a geoscientistIIThe next I’m a Geoscientist event is taking place on 9–20 March 2015. If you’d like to apply as a teacher (giving your classes the opportunity to interact with geoscientists) or as a researcher, see the details below. The deadline for all applications is 26 January 2015, and GIFT teachers and EGU members are eligible to apply.

 

Teachers

To apply to take part in the event, go to http://imageoscientist.eu/teachers/ and fill in the simple online form for teachers. Applications are open to all teachers who have taken part in a GIFT event (at any time). Successful teachers will be notified shortly after the deadline for applications, and the event will take place over two weeks on 9–20 March 2015. You will need to use some class time before the event to prepare your students, but we have flexible lesson plans already prepared to help you keep the class time used to a minimum.

To take part you need to be able to devote at least 2 hours (it doesn’t matter when, and the maximum you will need is 5 hours) for those two weeks to ready your students for interacting with the scientists and take part in some online discussion – and of course you will have to have reliable internet access. The entire event will be conducted in English, so you and your class will also need a basic understanding of and ability to write questions to scientists in English. Why not team up with your school’s English department and use the event as a language learning exercise as well? If you choose to do this, make sure that the teacher who has been involved with GIFT in the past is the one who formally registers.

 

Scientists

For scientists, this is a unique opportunity to get involved with some public engagement from the comfort of your own home or lab computer, in your own time. You can build up your skills in talking about your research to varied audiences, tick the box for public engagement in your funding proposals, gain an understanding of how the public relate to research and, importantly, help inspire the next generation about the geosciences.

The potential of winning the €500 prize for further public engagement is also attractive. A public engagement activity could involve: buying equipment to allow a research oceanography vessel to communicate with school students during expeditions, funding an open day for communities living in a disaster area to find out about natural hazards research and get advice, giving the money to a school in Uganda to pay for science kits and a projector to watch science films on or buying a quadcopter to film inside the rim of a volcano and help school children understand their local natural environment. To find out more about the experience of participating as a scientist read the interview with 2014 winner Anna Rabitti.

To apply to take part in the event go to http://imageoscientist.eu/geoscientists/ and fill in the simple online form for scientists. Applications are open to all EGU members (if you are not a member you can register on the EGU website) from across Europe. Once applications close, we will ask the registered school classes to judge the scientist applications and chose the final 5 scientists who will get to take part in the final event. Successful scientists will be notified a couple of weeks after the deadline for applications.

To take part you need to be able to devote around an hour a day (it doesn’t matter when, but if you can devote more time that is always better) for those two weeks to answer the questions posed by the students – and of course you will have to have reliable internet access. The entire event will be conducted in English, so you will also need to be able to confidently understand and communicate in English.

If you have any other questions about the event, please contact Bárbara Ferreira at EGU (media@egu.eu, +49-89-2180-6703) or Gallomanor’s Angela Manasor (angela@gallomanor.com, and +44-1225-326892).

This blog post is based on materials by Jane Robb, former EGU Educational Fellow

 

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