Introducing the EGU Executive Office

With so many thinking the EGU’s activities are restricted to the organisation and running of the General Assembly, we thought we’d share a behind-the-scenes peek at the team who works year-round to promote the Earth, ocean and planetary sciences and the work of the members of the Union.

The EGU Office Team. From left to right: Philippe, Sarah, Bárbara, Robert, Laura, Christine and Leslie. Skye, in the front, is the energetic EGU office dog. (Credit: Bárbara Ferreira/EGU).

The EGU Office Team. From left to right: Philippe, Sarah, Bárbara, Robert, Laura, Christine and Leslie. Skye, in the front, is the energetic EGU office dog. (Credit: Bárbara Ferreira/EGU).

At the EGU Executive Office in Munich, Germany, you’ll find the Union’s headquarters. With a team of six employees, which grows to seven when a Union Fellow is appointed, the office runs the day-to-day activities of the EGU. We work year-round on assisting the EGU membership, running media and communications activities and the various EGU-related websites, among other activities. In these, we work in close collaboration with Copernicus, our publisher and conference organiser, and with the EGU Council and the various committees.

EGU Executive Secretary Philippe Courtial manages the office. With eight committees, the Union Council and the Executive board, it is also Philippe’s job to liaise between them all and assist them in their activities. Additionally, Philippe champions the work of the EGU and its members amongst our partner associations and by promoting the Union at conferences worldwide.

Robert Barsch is the Union’s Webmaster and System Administrator. He develops and maintains the EGU’s websites, including Imaggeo and the EGU Blogs, while at the same time taking care of the office’s IT needs. Christine Leidel is in charge of the EGU’s bookkeeping and handling travel expenses, while Leslie Todd provides administrative assistance, organises the Union’s business meetings and handles all membership issues. Leslie is also in charge of maintaining the all-important office coffee and biscuit supplies!

Keeping EGU members and other geoscientists, journalists and the broader public abreast of developments throughout the year falls to the EGU Communications Team. Overall coordination of these activities is the job of EGU Media and Communications Manager Bárbara Ferreira. Bárbara produces the EGU news items and press releases, the EGU’s monthly newsletter, and she also takes on the role of press officer at the annual General Assembly. Barbara is assisted by EGU Communications Officer Laura Roberts, who is in charge of the EGU’s online presence, including social media channels and the blogs. Additionally, she is the point of contact in the office for the Union’s early career scientist (ECS) membership.

The newest member of the EGU Office Team is Sarah Connors, the EGU Science Policy Fellow, who joined us in September this year. Sarah will be working to implement science-policy related activities for EGU scientists. You can learn more about Sarah’s role in this blog post.

To learn more about the EGU’s year-round activities why not visit our website? You’ll be able to find out more about some of our media and communications projects here. Our early career members can find information regarding jobs, career prospects, what’s on for the ECS community at the General Assembly, and much more on our dedicated ECS website.

Join the EGU Blog Network!

Join the EGU Blog Network!

After announcing earlier this week that we are sadly saying goodbye to the EGU network blog Between a Rock and Hard Place, the time has come to find a new blog to take their place. If you are an Earth, planetary or space researcher (a PhD student, an early career scientist, or a more established one) with a passion for communicating your work, we’d like to hear from you!

We currently feature blogs in palaeontology (Green Tea and Velociraptors), international development (Geology for Global Development), geochemistry (GeoSphere), atmospheric sciences (Polluting the Internet), and more! Initially, we are looking to fill the gap left in the network by Between a Rock and Hard Place, which covered broad themes within volcanology and petrology. But, with so much great geoscience out there, we’d love to receive blog proposals from more fields within the Earth, planetary and space sciences we don’t yet feature on the network. This also means we may not limit the addition to the EGU network to one blog; if there is more than one strong candidate we’ll consider expanding the network further.

The network aims at fostering a diverse community of geoscience bloggers, sharing accurate information about geoscientific research in a language understandable not only to fellow scientists but also to the broader public. You, as an expert in your own research area, are in a better position than we are to share recent development in your area of research.

The benefits: apart from your site gaining exposure by having its posts listed on the front page of the EGU website, we will also share highlights of your work on our social media channels (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+) and advertise the blog network at our General Assembly, which has over 12,000 attendees. And, of course, you’ll get to join a great community of bloggers!

With the exception of An Atom’s-Eye View of the Planet, the network blogs are authored by early career researchers. In this call for bloggers we are particularly keen to add diversity to the network, and particularly welcome applications from more established scientists.

Having an existing blog is not a requirement for application. However, if you don’t have a blog already, we’d like you to have at least some experience of writing for a broader audience, be it as a guest blogger, or contributing to outlets such as The Conversation, for instance. In this case, let us know what you’d like your blog to be called, what topics you would cover, and link to articles you’ve published in the past.

If you’d like your blog (or blog idea) to be considered for our network, fill out this form by 11th September.

Join the EGU Network blogs . Credit: ClkerFreeVectorImages (distributed via  pixabay)

Join the EGU Network blogs . Credit: ClkerFreeVectorImages (distributed via pixabay)

Please note that only blogs in English will be considered, as this is the EGU working language, and the language of the blog network. We particularly encourage applications from all European countries, not just English-speaking countries, but bloggers from outside Europe can also apply.

Feel free to contact the EGU Communications Officer Laura Roberts if you have any questions. In the meantime – happy blogging!

The EGU Network blogs are looking for guest contributions

Are you a budding science writer, or want to try your hand at science communication? You might just be the person for our EGU network bloggers! A number of our network blogs would like to give their pages a bit of a boost and are seeking guest bloggers to contribute new, informative and engaging posts on an ad hoc basis.

If you’ve recently been thinking about trying your hand at blogging, but aren’t sure if it’s for you or simply have a great story or research that you’d like to see ‘in print’, why not give guest blogging a try? Read on to find out which blogs are looking for contributions.

Four Degrees

4degreesWritten by Flo Bullough and Marion Ferrat , Four Degrees, looks at environmental geoscience issues from a science for policy perspective. Environmental geochemistry, climate change, policy and sustainability are brought together in this blog and explored at the interface between science and society.

Flo and Marion are looking for guest contributions, but would also be happy to welcome a more regular blogger to their team. So if you are interested in geoscience and policy and are looking for the opportunity to get into some regular science writing, fill out this form and Flo and Marion will be in touch soon!

Geology for Global Development (GfGD)

GfGDGfGD is a UK-based organisation, working to support young geologists to make an effective contribution to international development. The network blog is a place for the organisation to share articles, discussions, photographs and news about the role of geology within sustainable development and the fight against global poverty

Blog editor, and founder of the organisation, Joel Gill, has his hands full running the blog, the organisation and completing his PhD. As a result, the blog is particularly looking for guest contributions which explore the principles of international development and how the earth sciences can make a difference. Take a look at the blog for some inspiration and pitch your ideas to Joel using this form.

Geology Jenga

JengaA broad range of topics find their way into the posts of Geology Jenga, with authors Dan Schillereff and Laura Roberts Artal writing about all things science communication, their careers as budding academics, as well as the science behind geophysics and geomorphology.

However, since finishing their PhDs, the demands of their 9 to 5 jobs mean that Dan and Laura have less time to write and would welcome guest contributions on any of the topics above. If you’d like to contribute to the blog, why not get in touch with them using this form?


GeoSphereThe term geosphere is an all-encompassing word that incorporates just about every aspect of the earth sciences. This means that topics ranging from geophysics to geochemistry to geobiology are part of the geosphere. The blog Geosphere honours its namesake by covering any and every topic in the geosciences. However, with blog author, Matt Herod’s research interests in geochemistry and hydrogeology you’ll likely find more posts on these topics.

Matt aims to make science clear for anyone that should stumble upon the geosciences and enhance awareness of the geosphere. If these goals resonate with you, then you writing for the Geosphere blog might just be the thing for you. Why not get in touch with Matt using this form?

Polluting the Internet

PollutingWill Morgan, an atmospheric sciences researcher from the University of Manchester, blogs at Polluting the Internet. Focusing on tiny particles suspended in our atmosphere, called aerosols, which can build up and pollute our skies. In the blog, Will explores current research in aerosol science, as well as his fieldwork exploits in pursuit of these tiny particles.

If this is your area of research too and you’d like to contribute a guest blog post on the subject, why not give it a go! You can get in touch with Will by filling out this form.

Green Tea and Velociraptors

GreenWhilst swamped by the writing of the thesis, Jon welcomes guest contributions to his blog too. Covering the subject of palaeontology as well as regularly writing about science communication and the open science movement, the blog has a diverse readership and offers a great platform for anyone how has something to say about these topics. Get in touch with Jon using this form.

The network blogs cover a range of topics in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, with the aim to foster a diverse community of geoscientist bloggers. If you’d like to submit a guest blog post, please fill out the forms available above. For general guest blogging guidelines, please refer to the submit a post page on the EGU official blog GeoLog.


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