GeoLog

Open Access

Upload your 2015 General Assembly presentation

Upload your 2015 General Assembly presentation

This year it is once again possible to upload your oral presentations, PICO presentations and posters from EGU 2015 for online publication alongside your abstract, giving all participants a chance to revisit your contribution  hurrah for open science!

Files can be in either PowerPoint or PDF format. Note that presentations will be distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licence. Uploading your presentation is free of charge and is not followed by a review process. The upload form for your presentation, together with further information on the licence it will be distributed under, is available here. You will need to log in using your Copernicus Office User ID (using the ID of the Corresponding Author) to upload your presentation.

Presentations and posters will be linked to from their corresponding abstracts. If your presentation didn’t have an abstract (this is the case for Short Courses and others), but you still want to share it with the wider community you can consider uploading your presentation to slideshare or figshare as a PDF to share it instead.

The best of Imaggeo in 2014: in pictures.

From the rifting of the African continent, to mighty waterfalls in Slovenia, through to a bird’s eye view of the Glarus Thurst in the Alps, images from Imaggeo, the EGU’s open access geosciences image repository, they have given us some stunning views of the geoscience of Planet Earth and beyond. In this post we have curated some of our favourites, including header images from across our social media channels and Immageo on Mondays blog posts of 2014. Of course, these are only a few of the very special images we highlighted in 2014, but take a look at our image repository, Imaggeo, for many other spectacular geo-themed pictures, including the winning images of the 2014 Photo Contest. The competition will be running again this year, so if you’ve got a flare for photography or have managed to capture a unique field work moment, consider uploading your images to Imaggeo and entering the Photo Contest.

Kilimanjaro from Mount Meru Credit: Alexis Merlaud (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Kilimanjaro from Mount Meru Credit: Alexis Merlaud (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Plate tectonics in East Africa created Kilimajaro and have also played a role in early human evolution, by shaping the local landscape and the long-term climate, thus modifying the environment of our ancestors. East Africa is the area in the world where most of the hominid fossils have been discovered, including Homo sapiens – the oldest fossil record is 200,000 years old and started to move out from Africa 100,000 years ago!

Peričnik waterfall, an amazing sight in Slovenia’s Triglav National Park. (Credit: Cyril Mayaud, distributed by imaggeo.egu.eu)

Peričnik waterfall, an amazing sight in Slovenia’s Triglav National Park. (Credit: Cyril Mayaud, distributed by imaggeo.egu.eu)

The picture above shows the lower Peričnik waterfall during winter season. This cascade system is composed of two successive waterfalls that stretch some 16 metres (upper fall) and 52 metres (lower fall) high and is one of the most beautiful natural sights in the Triglav National Park (Slovenia). The cliff is located at the western rim of a U shaped valley and is composed of a very permeable conglomerate rock, which is made up of glacier material that accumulated at the rims of the valley back when the glacier retreated.

Black Rolling.  (Credit: Philippe Leloup via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Black Rolling. (Credit: Philippe Leloup via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Polished slab of a mylonitic level of the Ailao Shan Red River shear zone (SE Asia) with an anphibole-rich layer showing left-lateral rolling structure (total width ~20 cm).

Hessdalen sky & Aurora. (Credit: Bjørn Gitle Hauge distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Hessdalen sky & Aurora. (Credit: Bjørn Gitle Hauge distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The night sky over Hessdalen Valley. Together with the radar an all-sky Nikon D700 camera monitors the whole night sky, covering the same area/view as the radar. The camera is equipped with an 8 mm fisheye lens computer controlled by Nikons Camera Control pro2 software, shooting simultaneous pictures with 30 seconds of shutter opening.

Men and children drawing water for irrigation during a sandstorm. (Credit: Velio Coviello via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Men and children drawing water for irrigation during a sandstorm. (Credit: Velio Coviello via imaggeo.egu.eu)

One of the winning images of the EGU 2014 Photo Contest, sheds light on the problems associated with conserving soils and water in Western Africa.

Desert fires feeding a convective cloud system over Mono Lake, California. (Credit: Gabriele Stiller distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Desert fires feeding a convective cloud system over Mono Lake, California. (Credit: Gabriele Stiller distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Wildfires frequently break out in the Californian summer. The grass is dry, the ground parched and a small spark can start a raging fire, but burning can begin even when water is about. When a blaze started beside Mono Lake, what got it going and what it may have started in the sky?

Moonlit glacier. (Credit: Marco Matteucci distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Moonlit glacier. (Credit: Marco Matteucci distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Early morning wake-up at the moonlit Alpine refuge Quintino Sella in the Felik glacier (3585 m). Mount Rosa ridge, Valle d’Aosta, Italy.

Air, Fire, Earth and Water. (Credit: Sabrina Matzger via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Air, Fire, Earth and Water. (Credit: Sabrina Matzger via imaggeo.egu.eu)

In the summer of 2001, southern Iceland, including the Reykjanes peninsula, was struck by a series of earthquakes, the largest of which was magnitude 6.6. Following the earthquakes, the water levels in Lake Kleifarvatn began to drop; by 2001 the water level had diminished by 4m. A fissure, approximately 400m long and 30cm wide, observed in the vicinity of the lake, was seen to disappear below its waters. It is thought the fissure is responsible for the draining of the lake between 2000 and 2001.

Glarus Alps. (Credit: Kurt Stüwe, via imaggeo.egu.eu

Glarus Alps. (Credit: Kurt Stüwe, via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Undoubtedly, the Alps are one of the best studied mountain ranges in the world. Appreciating their immense beauty and geological wealth can be difficult from the ground, given their vast scale and the inaccessibility of some of their more challenging peaks. Kurt Stüwe, along with alpine photographer Ruedi Homberger, set about changing this by undertaking the ambitious task of photographing the length of the Alps, from Nice to Vienna, in a small aircraft. The result is a compilation of stunning photographs that capture the magnificence of the Alps and contribute to a better understanding of their geological history.

Choosing amongst the 12 beautiful header images we’ve had this year was not easy! Here we highlight three; but in truth, they are all worthy of mention!

Morning Voyage. (Credit: Sierra Pope distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Morning Voyage, the April 2014 header image. (Credit: Sierra Pope distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Parque Nacional de Timanfaya – Montañas del Fuego, Lanzarote. Header image of September 2014. (Credit: Frederik Tack distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Parque Nacional de Timanfaya – Montañas del Fuego, Lanzarote. Header image of September 2014. (Credit: Frederik Tack distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Mount Moran. Credit: Josep Miquel Ubalde Bauló distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Mount Moran, October 2014. Credit: Josep Miquel Ubalde Bauló distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Mount Moran (12,605 feet (3,842 m)) is a mountain in Grand Teton National Park of western Wyoming, USA. Mount Moran dominates the northern section of the Teton Range rising 6,000 feet (1,800 m) above Jackson Lake.[4] Several active glaciers exist on the mountain with Skillet Glacier plainly visible on the monolithic east face. Like the Middle Teton in the same range, Mount Moran’s face is marked by a distinctive basalt intrusion known as the Black Dike.

As these highlights show, 2014 has spoilt us with an incredible set of images! We look forward to more in 2015. Best wishes from EGU for the new year!

 

If you pre-register for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

GeoEd: Citizen Geoscience

GeoEd: Citizen Geoscience

In this month’s GeoEd column, Sam Illingworth tells us about the growing use of Citizen Science within research as a means of acquiring data. Whilst the practice is novel and offers exciting opportunities as to volumes of data collected Sam highlights the importance of appropriately crediting the work of the willing volunteers.

Citizen Science is a phrase that is currently de rigour in scientific communication circles. In essence it can be thought of as a form of collaborative research that involves members of the general public (or citizens), which actively involves them collecting or generating data.

There are many examples of citizen science projects in the geosciences, including Old Weather a ‘data mining’ citizen science project that aims to help scientists recover Arctic and worldwide weather observations made by US ships since the mid-19th century, by enlisting citizens to interpret old transcriptions (e.g. track ship movements) in order to generate new data. Such ultimately improves our knowledge of past environmental conditions, with a better understanding and capability to model these past occurrences ultimately leading to an improvement in modelling future events.

Just some of the cropland that still needs to be captured! (Photo Credit: Tony Atkin)

Just some of the cropland that still needs to be captured! (Photo Credit: Tony Atkin)

Another example of a citizen science project in the geosciences, and again one which involves data analysis rather than data creation, is Cropland Capture, which focused on improving current cropland extent by classifying all very high resolution images found on Google Earth to create a wall-to-wall map of cropland. Accurate and reliable global cropland extent maps are essential for estimating and forecasting crop yield, in particular losses due to drought and production anomalies. Realising the tremendous scale of this task, developers created a multi-platform game in which players were provided with a satellite image or in-situ photo, and had to determine if the image contained cropland or not. This element of ‘gamification’ is a popular way of engaging members of the general public, with prizes awarded to the top 3 capturers in an award ceremony in May of this year. The success of this approach is evident by the fact that over 4.5 mil sq km of land was validated during the 6 months of this project!

There are also a number of citizen science programmes that actively source data directly from members of the public. For example, the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) is a non-profit, community-based network of volunteers who measure and map precipitation using low-cost measurement tools with an interactive website. The project started in Colorado in 1998 and now has networks across the US and Canada, involving thousands of volunteers, making it the largest provider of daily precipitation observation in the US. CoCoRaHS inspired a similar project that was trialled in the UK, the ‘UK Community Rain Network’ (UCRaiN), which showed the potential for setting up a UK-based network. As well as improving the coverage of the current network of raingauges, and therefore the potential application to forecasting, nowcasting, satellite and radar validation, flood warning systems and decision making, a community rainfall collection scheme has the the additional benefit of encouraging citizens to become involved in meteorological science, thereby heightening their awareness about weather.

Map showing the locations of the participating UCRaiN sites (schools and individuals). The meteorological sites used for comparison are shown by the square symbols (Photo Credit: Illingworth, et al.)

Map showing the locations of the participating UCRaiN sites (schools and individuals). The meteorological sites used for comparison are shown by the square symbols (Photo Credit: Illingworth, et al.)

The main objection to these types of citizen science projects are that they are potentially tantamount to free labour; with scientists using the general public to collect and/or analyse vast swaths of data, whilst they steal all of the ‘glory’, perhaps in a matter analogous to a particularly unsympathetic professor and their postgraduate students. After all, whilst there are many incentives for mining and analysing the data, it is not the citizens whose name will be appearing on the research papers and grant applications that so often come about from these projects. By appealing to the noble intentions of the citizens, and placing an emphasis on the progression of science for the greater good, is there not the risk that some of the researchers sitting atop of these projects come across as hypocritical?

Perhaps the most famous example of a truly collaborative citizen science project is the Human Genome Project, an international scientific research project with the goal of mapping all of the genes of the human genome from both a physical and functional standpoint. It remains the world’s largest collaborative biological project, and serves as a great example of science genuinely being conducted for and on behalf of the greater good. Whilst publically acknowledged projects such as this are obviously an extreme example (the Human Genome Project was conducted using $3 billion of public funding), there is still plenty of opportunity for researchers to ensure that the citizens that they employ are properly recognised. For example, in the UCRaiN project, all of the participating schools were given credit in the acknowledgments section of the research article that was produces as a result of the study.

The first printout of the human genome to be presented as a series of books (Photo Credit: CC-BY-SA-3.0; Released under the GNU Free Documentation License)

The first printout of the human genome to be presented as a series of books (Photo Credit: CC-BY-SA-3.0; Released under the GNU Free Documentation License)

Overall, citizen science projects are becoming an increasingly popular means to engage the public, whilst also benefiting scientific research, especially given the growing ubiquity of social media and other communications platforms. However, there is a need to actively involve the participants in these projects, and to ensure that they receive the appropriate acknowledgments, otherwise we, as scientists, run the risk of treating our new colleagues as nothing more than second-class citizens.

By Sam Illingworth, Lecturer, Manchester Metropolitan University

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: