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EGU 2016: Get the Assembly mobile app!

Spot the difference! The dashboard on the iPhone and Android app.

Spot the difference! The dashboard on the iPhone and Android app.

The EGU 2016 mobile app is now available for iPhones and Android smartphones. To download it, you can scan the QR code available at the General Assembly website or go directly to http://app.egu2016.eu/ on your mobile device. You will be directed to the version of the EGU 2016 app for your particular smartphone, which you can download for free.

Once you open the app, the dashboard will show you five possibilities: you can browse and search the meeting programme, select presentations to be added to your own personal programme, and find out more about the General Assembly on Twitter. From here you can also access EGU Today: the daily newsletter at the General Assembly, highlighting interesting conference papers, medal lectures, workshops, GeoCinema events among many others! Just click on the button on the bottom right to download the electronic PDF version of each edition of the newsletter.

The icon in the top left takes you to the main menu, where you can read more about the Assembly, and if you find yourself lost in the conference centre, there are floor plans to show you the way:

The Android (left) and iPhone (right) app main menu. Click on the image to enlarge.

The Android (left) and iPhone (right) app main menu. Click on the image to enlarge.

You can browse the meeting programme by selecting “Browse” (also accessible from the dashboard), and choose a session or group of sessions (example, Short Courses, SC) for a list of talks including title, date, time and location. The coloured square indicates in what level the room is located (Brown Level – Basement, Yellow Level – Ground Floor, etc.).

Browsing Short Courses on the Android (left) and iPhone (right) app. Click on the image to enlarge.

Browsing Short Courses on the Android (left) and iPhone (right) app. Click on the image to enlarge.

By clicking on a listed talk, you can find more information about the presentation in question. To add an oral or poster presentation to your personal programme (accessible from the dashboard or side menu), simply click on the star on the top right corner of the description. You can also add it to your phone calendar by turning the “In Calendar” button on.

Session details listed in the Android (left) and iPhone (right) app. Click on the image to enlarge.

Session details listed in the Android (left) and iPhone (right) app. Click on the image to enlarge.

Presentations already added to your personal programme will be listed with a yellow star. Simply click on the yellow star again to remove it. You can synchronise this information with your online personal programme by selecting the icon in the top right corner of your programme. This will let you access the same information from the EGU 2016 website.

Create your own personal programme using the mobile app. Click on the image to enlarge.

Create your own personal programme using the mobile app. Click on the image to enlarge.

For what’s going on during – and in the lead up to – the Assembly, select the Twitter icon from the dashboard. If you are unfamiliar with Twitter, this is essentially a news feed for the General Assembly, where you can follow what’s going on in real-time, see what sessions other people recommend and ask questions of Assembly participants. To ask a question or highlight a great session, simply click on the bird (iPhone) or share icon (Android). All tweets are automatically tagged with #EGU16 so they will be added to the conference Twitter feed.

We hope you enjoy the app and the conference, see you in Vienna!

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 17 to 22 April. Check out the full session programme on the General Assembly website.

Blogs and social media at EGU 2016 – tune in to the conference action

Blogs and social media at EGU 2016 – tune in to the conference action

With hundreds of oral presentations, PICO sessions and poster presentations taking place each day, it can be difficult to keep abreast of everything that is on offer during the General Assembly.

As well as finding highlights of interesting conference papers, lectures and workshops in the daily newsletter at the General Assembly, EGU Today, you can also keep up to date with all the conference activities online.

Blogging

GeoLog will be updated regularly throughout the General Assembly, highlighting some of the meeting’s most interesting sessions, workshops and lectures, as well as featuring interviews with scientists attending the Assembly.

For the first time, the EGU Division Blogs will have a team of student reporters who will write about interesting research and sessions during the Assembly, so you can catch up on any sessions you’ve missed and get a feel for what’s going on in the press room through them!

The view from social media HQ at EGU 2012.

The view from social media HQ at EGU 2012.

Stay tuned to the EGU Blog Network  for further coverage of science presented at the conference.

As in previous years, the EGU will be compiling a list of General Assembly related blogs (the blogroll) and making them available through GeoLog.  You can add your blog to the blogroll here.

Tweeting

Participants can keep updated with General Assembly goings on by following the EGU twitter account (@EuroGeosciences) and the conference hashtag (#EGU16). You can also direct questions to the EGU communications staff and other participants using #EGU16, or by tweeting to @EuroGeosciences directly. If you’ve got the Assembly app, you can share snippets of great sessions straight from there!

This year, each of the programme groups also has its own hashtag. If you’re in a Geomorphology (GM) session, say GM2.1, you can tweet about it using #EGU16GM, or if you’re in one of the Outreach, education and media (OEM) sessions, use #EGU16OEM – just add the acronym of the respective programme group to #EGU16! ! A full list of conference hashtags is available here, and in the programme book. Conveners are welcome to add their own hashtags into the mix too! Just let everyone know at the start of the session.

Facebook

The EGU communications staff will be advertising General Assembly sessions and will post about research being presented at the Assembly on Facebook. Just type European Geosciences Union into the Facebook search bar to find the EGU official page, and like it to receive the updates.

And more!

While these will be the main media streams during the Assembly, you can also search for European Geosciences Union on Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube to keep up with us there!

Social media guidelines

So that conference participants can embrace social media while at the same time remaining respectful of presenting authors’ work and protecting their research output, we’ve put together some social media guidelines, which you can find on the EGU 2016 website.

If you do not want their results posted on any social media networks or blogs download this icon and include it in your slides or poster.

If you do not want your results posted on any social media networks or blogs download this icon and include it in your slides or poster.

The EGU encourages open discussion on social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and blogging platforms during the General Assembly. The default assumption is to allow open discussion of General Assembly oral, PICO, and poster presentations on social media. However, please respect any request from an author to not disseminate the contents of their presentation.
The following icon may be downloaded from the EGU General Assembly website for inclusion on slides or posters to clearly express when an author does not want their results posted on any social media networks or blogs.

You can find out more about our social media guidelines and conference rules of conduct online.

 

 

 

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 17 to 22 April. Check out the full session programme on the General Assembly website.

GeoTalk: Fishing meets science with waders and smartphones

GeoTalk: Fishing meets science with waders and smartphones

Dutch and American researchers have developed waders equipped with temperature sensors that enable fly-fishers to find the best fishing locations while collecting data to help scientists study streams. The research is published today (29 February) in Geoscientific Instrumentation Methods and Data Systems (GI), an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union. In this GeoTalk interview we talk to Rolf Hut, a hydrologist at the Delft University of Technology, and lead author of the paper, as well as with Tim van Emmerik, co-author of the paper and also a hydrologist at Delft University of Technology, to learn more about this unique invention and its application for both hydrologists and fly fishers!

What was the motivation behind this study? How did the idea to use temperature sensing waders for environmental sciences come about?

Rolf: The idea originated during a discussion between Scott Tyler and I at the 2014 AGU Fall Meeting . We were discussing the difficulty in calibrating DTS (Distributed Temperature Sensing, see Selker et al., 2006) in streambeds and suddenly the thought popped in our heads that we are wearing waders when installing DTS cables, why not equip the waders with temperature sensors? When we started to further think this idea through (beer may have been involved), we realised that fly-fishers walking in streams with temperature sensing waders would make a great source of data for scientists studying hyporheic exchange (the study of groundwater-streamwater interaction).

Furthermore, fly fishers themselves could benefit from knowing local stream temperature to find optimal fishing locations. Therefore, we set out to, as a first test, prove that temperature sensing waders could potentially provide this information. The result of that test is presented in our current paper.

What data do you hope to collect with your waders and what applications, both for the scientific community and the wider public, would the data have?

Rolf Hut testing the temperature-sensing waders in the field. Credit: Tim van Emmerik

Rolf Hut testing the temperature-sensing waders in the field. Credit: Tim van Emmerik

Rolf: As scientists, we hope these data help us better understand where groundwater enters streams and where stream water drains away to the groundwater. Hyporheic exchange (groundwater-streamwater interaction) is a complex field of study, with very local places where groundwater enters small streams. Understanding this is vital in understanding stream-water ecology: which species live where in the stream. Ultimately, good understanding of stream dynamics helps us advise policies that better balance multiple use of stream water: as a natural habitat for plants and animals, and as a human drinking resource and place for recreation.

However, measurements of streamflow dynamics, including stream temperature, are usually labour intensive and at the same time, stream dynamics vary highly between different streams. For better understanding, more measurements are needed, but scientists are (rightly so) budget constrained in this. Therefore, we believe our temperature sensing waders, when applied at large scale, can be very beneficial to our understanding of stream dynamics.

Tim: In just the USA alone, an estimated 27 million recreational anglers regularly fish in freshwater streams and lakes. Imagine if they were all equipped with a temperature sensing wader! This would mean a constant supply of new, accurate data, which can be used to estimate water quality and quantity, fish ‘hotspots’, and overall state of the ecosystem.

How did you show your idea of using waders and smartphones to measure water temperature was feasibility?

Rolf: In this paper we only wanted to test whether a sensor in the bottom of a wader would be able to detect (large) differences in stream temperature so we could pinpoint locations of groundwater-streamwater interaction.

We tested this in two ways. First, we tested it in the field by walking in a stream where we knew a localised influx of cold groundwater was present. I was wearing the waders and also used a reference thermometer to measure water temperature. Secondly, we tested how long it takes for the waders to change temperature when exposed to a drop, or rise, in temperature. We tested this in the Water Lab of Delft University of Technology by preheating the waders and then exposing it to the colder water of the flume in our lab. We differed the flow velocity in the flume, and also tested what the influence of having a (warm blooded) human leg in the wader was to the temperature it sensed.

Could you clarify what advances you’ve made since you first presented this research at the EGU General Assembly last April?

Rolf: After the initial idea, I submitted an abstract to the General Assembly. In the abstract for the GA I merely promised to “show a prototype”. Because of other academic deadlines, and my own chaotic mind, this meant that the prototype demonstrated at the General Assembly was made the Sunday before the GA started, in our AirBnB apartment in Vienna. My poster had an explanation of “the idea” in it, and my phone showed the real-time temperature of the wader. I had to calibrate it on the spot, so I needed both a hot and a cold reference temperature. We used the ice intended for the beers during the poster session as cold calibration. If people are still wondering why the beer was not as cold as it should have been that day: now they know. Hooray for last minute science :-s. However, walking around in waders during the poster session drew the attention of journalist who covered our work. Which was, honestly, at that point at a very early stage. For the work presented in this paper, we took the time to be more precise and did a proper calibration in our lab.

Tim: The presentation at EGU got a lot of enthusiastic reactions, from scientists, professionals, journalists, and many others. We used the momentum that was gained at the GA to very effectively do our lab measurements, fieldwork campaign at a beautiful Dutch windmill-filled site, and wrap up the study in a concise paper.

Location in the Dutch country side where researchers tested their prototype waders. Credit: Tim van Emmerik

Location in the Dutch country side where researchers tested their prototype waders. Credit: Tim van Emmerik

Do you have any plans to actively engage the fishing community and get members of the public to use the waders?

Rolf: Now that we have demonstrated first feasibility we want to discus with producers of waders to find the best way to easily incorporate sensors in many waders. Once that is sorted out, we want to reach out to communities with interest, such as (fly-)fishing groups, local conservation groups and schools. After the press coverage that the GA sparked, several of these groups already reached out to us. I have kept that at arm’s length for now, because we wanted to be sure that the ideal would hold up to a first test, which we now have demonstrated.

In your view, what are the most important results and implications of this study?

Rolf: it works!

Basically, we had a wild idea at the AGU Fall Meeting and demonstrated a prototype at the EGU General Assembly. We now have demonstrated that this prototype is capable of measuring the type of temperature changes we are interested in. With that hurdle taken, the road to citizen science campaigns is now open.

Tim: This work really is an example of how relatively simple measurement devices can be fused with existing equipment to actively involve communities in gathering scientific data. It’s becoming a trend to find ways to incorporate ‘alternative’ communities in science. Whether it’s school kids or fishermen, studies like ours demonstrate that everyone can be a scientist.

For more information about the research published in Geoscientific Instrumentation Methods and Data Systems (GI) you can read the associated press release issued today to accompany the publication. You’ll also find the open-access paper by following this link.

Science communication opportunity at the EGU General Assembly: be a student reporter

Science communication opportunity at the EGU General Assembly: be a student reporter

For the first time at the 2016 General Assembly, which is taking place in Vienna, Austria, from 17–22 April, we will be implementing a Student Reporter Programme. A team of volunteer early career researchers will report, via the Union’s social media outlets and blogs, on the findings presented at scientific sessions and press conferences during the General Assembly.

What is involved in being a student reporter?

We are giving the opportunity to four geosciences students with an interest in science communication, pre-registered to attend the conference,  to be involved in reporting, science writing, videography and social media activities during the conference.

The student reporters will attend scientific sessions, as well as Union-wide sessions, such as the Great Debates and Medal lectures, and report on the findings presented on the EGU Blogs. They will work closely with the division bloggers and social media managers, who will provide the main outlet for the content produced by the student reporters, via the division blogs and division social media channels. Some findings and those which cover scientific disciplines not represented by the division blogs will be included in the EGU’s official blog, GeoLog.

The successful candidates will be part of the Student Reporter team, coordinated by the EGU’s Communication team. The reporters will have access to the press centre, interview rooms, as well as being encouraged to attend the science-communication related short courses at the conference. Reporters will also be given access to a range of science-communication resources to develop their communications skills. Interview-style reporting will be encouraged, giving reporters the opportunity to interact with prominent scientists and keynote speakers.

This is an unpaid opportunity for early career geoscientists with an interest in science communication who want to gain experience in science reporting via online platforms at a major scientific conference.

How to apply

The positions are open to University students (undergraduates or postgraduates) in the Earth, planetary and space sciences wishing to gain experience in science outreach. Candidates must be pre-registered to attend the conference when submitting their application and available for an introductory meeting on Sunday the 17th April in Vienna, prior to the conference starting.  Applicants must have a good command of English and good computer and internet skills.

Applications must include:

  • A letter of motivation (maximum one page), which includes a summary of relevant experience. Please specify the scientific division(s) of the EGU with which you identify the most and for which you would be most keen to report for
  • A sample of recent science communication work such a photo feature, a short video or a written article or blog post (published or unpublished, aimed at a general audience, and maximum one page long)

The deadline for applications is 11 March 2016.

Application documents (in English) should be submitted by email in a single file to Bárbara Ferreira, the EGU Media and Communications Manager (media@egu.eu), and Laura Roberts, the EGU Communications Officer (networking@egu.eu). Bárbara and Laura can also be contacted for informal enquiries.

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