GeoLog

Media

My film is ready, now what?

My film is ready, now what?

It’s no secret that at EGU we believe using film as a medium to communicate science and engage the public with research is a great tool! So much so that we organise an annual competition for early career scientists (ECS) to produce a three-minute video to share their research with the general public, as well as publishing film how-to-guides on our blog and organising film-making workshops at our General Assembly (GA).

The film-making workshops of 2014 and 2015 focused on how to make a film: from producing the script right through to aspects of editing and post-production. This year, the workshop was delivered by Stefan Ruissen, an online & cross media specialist, and centred on how scientists can raise the profile of their film work. In today’s post, we highlight some of the main points from the workshop and share Stefan’s slides with you too.

The fact that rich-media and video has grown to form an integral part of conveying a message, be it a news story, a funny meme, or capturing moments of our everyday life should not be underestimated. Harnessing the growing popularity of video when it comes to helping you tell the narrative of your research is crucial!

Video and social media

Social media channels mean that the possibilities to communicate and share the film you invested so much time in creating have multiplied. An important take-home message from the 2014 workshop was knowing your audience: whom are you producing the film for and what message do you want them to take away from it?

Knowing your audience is vitally important when getting your work out there too– where is the most likely place you’ll find your audience: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, via a blog? Spend some time trying to work this out, both in the planning stages of film-making and once your video is ready.

Social media generates opportunities to share your film with a broad audience. Identify which channels are the best ones to reach your audience and tap into your existing networks for maximum impact.

Social media generates opportunities to share your film with a broad audience. Identify which channels are the best ones to reach your audience and tap into your existing networks for maximum impact.

And while social media generates so many opportunities to share your film, how people are consuming content online is also changing. In the past users would actively search for content they wanted to read about or watch; now a day, most content arrives at people’s doorsteps through algorithms curated by social media channels. This means that, not only is it important to get your film ‘out there’, you’ve also got to get it noticed.

So, once you’ve identified the best platforms to use, post the content and don’t forget to engage with your audience! Be sure to start a conversation and be part of it. You will most passionately tell your story, so use every opportunity to drum up further interest in your film.

Tips

  • Get noticed in on-line searches: When planning your film, think carefully about the title and once it is finished, invest time in preparing a description text and key words
  • Be prepared: Have a set of promotional materials to hand, inc. a film summary, stills from your video and a short trailer
  • YouTube: simply uploading your video is not enough. Social media 101 says your film should come complete with description, a link to further information/the film page (if available) and don’t forget a catchy preview image to hook viewers
  • Twitter: exploit your existing network, or spend time building links with relevant peers and organisations who can further your work. The same is true for hashtags – reach a bigger audience by tapping into # and using mentions
  • Facebook: Combine all your posts with stills or a trailer of your film (that’s where that preparation of promo materials comes in handy!)
  • Ask your audience: Put yourself in the shoes of your audience, how would you find new science related content? If you aren’t sure, speak to your audience, they’ll likely give you a few pointers!

Making your video isn’t the half of it: while there is no doubt that you should concentrate your efforts on planning, shooting and editing your video, save some energy to develop a strategy which will allow you to disseminate your film work effectively. For more details on how to best achieve this, why not take a look at Stefan’s presentation?

By Laura Roberts Artal, EGU Communications Officer

This blog post is based on the presentation by Stefan Ruissen at the Short Course: Scientists must film! (SC47) which took place at the 2016 EGU General Assembly in Vienna. The full presentation can be accessed here.

Blogs and social media at EGU 2016 – tune in to the conference action

Blogs and social media at EGU 2016 – tune in to the conference action

With hundreds of oral presentations, PICO sessions and poster presentations taking place each day, it can be difficult to keep abreast of everything that is on offer during the General Assembly.

As well as finding highlights of interesting conference papers, lectures and workshops in the daily newsletter at the General Assembly, EGU Today, you can also keep up to date with all the conference activities online.

Blogging

GeoLog will be updated regularly throughout the General Assembly, highlighting some of the meeting’s most interesting sessions, workshops and lectures, as well as featuring interviews with scientists attending the Assembly.

For the first time, the EGU Division Blogs will have a team of student reporters who will write about interesting research and sessions during the Assembly, so you can catch up on any sessions you’ve missed and get a feel for what’s going on in the press room through them!

The view from social media HQ at EGU 2012.

The view from social media HQ at EGU 2012.

Stay tuned to the EGU Blog Network  for further coverage of science presented at the conference.

As in previous years, the EGU will be compiling a list of General Assembly related blogs (the blogroll) and making them available through GeoLog.  You can add your blog to the blogroll here.

Tweeting

Participants can keep updated with General Assembly goings on by following the EGU twitter account (@EuroGeosciences) and the conference hashtag (#EGU16). You can also direct questions to the EGU communications staff and other participants using #EGU16, or by tweeting to @EuroGeosciences directly. If you’ve got the Assembly app, you can share snippets of great sessions straight from there!

This year, each of the programme groups also has its own hashtag. If you’re in a Geomorphology (GM) session, say GM2.1, you can tweet about it using #EGU16GM, or if you’re in one of the Outreach, education and media (OEM) sessions, use #EGU16OEM – just add the acronym of the respective programme group to #EGU16! ! A full list of conference hashtags is available here, and in the programme book. Conveners are welcome to add their own hashtags into the mix too! Just let everyone know at the start of the session.

Facebook

The EGU communications staff will be advertising General Assembly sessions and will post about research being presented at the Assembly on Facebook. Just type European Geosciences Union into the Facebook search bar to find the EGU official page, and like it to receive the updates.

And more!

While these will be the main media streams during the Assembly, you can also search for European Geosciences Union on Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube to keep up with us there!

Social media guidelines

So that conference participants can embrace social media while at the same time remaining respectful of presenting authors’ work and protecting their research output, we’ve put together some social media guidelines, which you can find on the EGU 2016 website.

If you do not want their results posted on any social media networks or blogs download this icon and include it in your slides or poster.

If you do not want your results posted on any social media networks or blogs download this icon and include it in your slides or poster.

The EGU encourages open discussion on social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and blogging platforms during the General Assembly. The default assumption is to allow open discussion of General Assembly oral, PICO, and poster presentations on social media. However, please respect any request from an author to not disseminate the contents of their presentation.
The following icon may be downloaded from the EGU General Assembly website for inclusion on slides or posters to clearly express when an author does not want their results posted on any social media networks or blogs.

You can find out more about our social media guidelines and conference rules of conduct online.

 

 

 

The EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria from 17 to 22 April. Check out the full session programme on the General Assembly website.

Science communication opportunity at the EGU General Assembly: be a student reporter

Science communication opportunity at the EGU General Assembly: be a student reporter

For the first time at the 2016 General Assembly, which is taking place in Vienna, Austria, from 17–22 April, we will be implementing a Student Reporter Programme. A team of volunteer early career researchers will report, via the Union’s social media outlets and blogs, on the findings presented at scientific sessions and press conferences during the General Assembly.

What is involved in being a student reporter?

We are giving the opportunity to four geosciences students with an interest in science communication, pre-registered to attend the conference,  to be involved in reporting, science writing, videography and social media activities during the conference.

The student reporters will attend scientific sessions, as well as Union-wide sessions, such as the Great Debates and Medal lectures, and report on the findings presented on the EGU Blogs. They will work closely with the division bloggers and social media managers, who will provide the main outlet for the content produced by the student reporters, via the division blogs and division social media channels. Some findings and those which cover scientific disciplines not represented by the division blogs will be included in the EGU’s official blog, GeoLog.

The successful candidates will be part of the Student Reporter team, coordinated by the EGU’s Communication team. The reporters will have access to the press centre, interview rooms, as well as being encouraged to attend the science-communication related short courses at the conference. Reporters will also be given access to a range of science-communication resources to develop their communications skills. Interview-style reporting will be encouraged, giving reporters the opportunity to interact with prominent scientists and keynote speakers.

This is an unpaid opportunity for early career geoscientists with an interest in science communication who want to gain experience in science reporting via online platforms at a major scientific conference.

How to apply

The positions are open to University students (undergraduates or postgraduates) in the Earth, planetary and space sciences wishing to gain experience in science outreach. Candidates must be pre-registered to attend the conference when submitting their application and available for an introductory meeting on Sunday the 17th April in Vienna, prior to the conference starting.  Applicants must have a good command of English and good computer and internet skills.

Applications must include:

  • A letter of motivation (maximum one page), which includes a summary of relevant experience. Please specify the scientific division(s) of the EGU with which you identify the most and for which you would be most keen to report for
  • A sample of recent science communication work such a photo feature, a short video or a written article or blog post (published or unpublished, aimed at a general audience, and maximum one page long)

The deadline for applications is 11 March 2016.

Application documents (in English) should be submitted by email in a single file to Bárbara Ferreira, the EGU Media and Communications Manager (media@egu.eu), and Laura Roberts, the EGU Communications Officer (networking@egu.eu). Bárbara and Laura can also be contacted for informal enquiries.

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