GeoLog

Imaggeo

Imaggeo on Mondays: Fly away, weather balloon

Some aspects of Earth Science are truly interdisciplinary and this week’s Imaggeo on Mondays photograph is testament to that. The maiden voyage of the research cruise SA Agulhas II offered the perfect opportunity to combine oceanographic research, as well as climate science studies. Raissa Philibert, a biogeochemistry PhD student, took this picture of the daily release of a weather balloon by meteorologists from the South African Weather Services.

Fly away, weather balloon! Credit: Raissa Philibert (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Fly away, weather balloon! Credit: Raissa Philibert (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The highlights of Raissa trip aboard the ship include

“the multidisciplinary aspects of the cruise. It was fascinating talking to people doing such different things. Being on the first scientific cruise aboard the vessel was also extremely exciting as well as going to the southern ocean in winter as this provides such rare datasets.”

This cruise was an excellent opportunity for scientists ranging from physical oceanographers, biogeochemists, meteorologists, ornithologists and zoologists to collect data. The two main scientific programmes aboard the cruise aimed to understand 1) the seasonal changes in the carbon cycle of the Southern Ocean, and 2) gain a better understanding of the modifications in water composition caused by the meeting and mixing of the Indian and Atlantic Oceans in the Agulhas Cape region in South Africa.

Understanding both of these processes is important because they impact on the global thermohaline circulation (THC), which is strongly related to global climate change. Think of the THC as a giant conveyor belt of water within the Earth’s oceans: warm surface currents, rush from equatorial regions towards the poles, encouraged by the wind. They cool and become denser during the time it takes them to make the journey northwards and eventually sink into the deep oceans at high latitudes. They then find their way towards ocean basins and eventually rise up (upwell if you prefer the more technical terms), predominantly, in the Southern Ocean. En route, these huge water masses transport energy (in the form of heat), as well as solids, dissolved substances and gases and distribute these across the planets Oceans. So you can see why understanding the THC is crucial to researchers wanting to better understand climate change.

This map shows the pattern of thermohaline circulation. This collection of currents is responsible for the large-scale exchange of water masses in the ocean, including providing oxygen to the deep ocean. The entire circulation pattern takes ~2000 years. Credit: Nasa Earth Observatory.

This map shows the pattern of thermohaline circulation. This collection of currents is responsible for the large-scale exchange of water masses in the ocean, including providing oxygen to the deep ocean. The entire circulation pattern takes ~2000 years. Credit: Nasa Earth Observatory.

The THCs also plays a large part in the carbon cycle in the oceans. Microscopic organisms called phytoplankton drive the main biological processes through which the ocean takes up carbon. They photosynthesise like plants which mean that they use carbon dioxide and water along with other nutrients to make their organic matter and grow. After some time, the phytoplankton die and their organic matter sinks. Part of this organic matter and carbon will remain stored in the deep ocean under various forms until it is brought back up thousands of years later by the THC. Through this cycle, phytoplankton play a major role in controlling the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and hence, also the Earth’s climate.

 

By Laura Roberts, EGU Communications Officer, and Raissa Philibert, PhD Student.

If you pre-register for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

EGU Photo Contest 2015

If you are pre-registered for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! Winners receive a free registration to next year’s General Assembly!

The sixth annual EGU photo competition opens on 1 February. Up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Shortlisted photos will be exhibited at the conference, together with the winning moving image, which will be selected by a panel of judges. General Assembly participants can vote for their favourite photos and the winning images will be announced on the last day of the meeting.

We particularly encourage submissions representing A voyage through scales, as there will be an additional prize for the photo that best captures the theme of the conferences.  Furthermore, on the occasion of the International Year of Soils, the judges will also be awarding an honourable mention to the best image in the Soil System Sciences category submitted to the EGU Photo Contest.

If you submit your images to the photo competition, they will also be included in the EGU’s open access photo database, Imaggeo. You retain full rights of use for any photos submitted to the database as they are licensed and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons license.

You will need to register on Imaggeo so that the organisers can appropriately process your photos. For more information, please check the EGU Photo Contest page on Imaggeo.

Previous winning photographs can be seen on the 20102011, 2012,  2013 and 2014 winners’ pages.

In the meantime, get shooting!

Grand Prismatic Spring. Winner in the EGU Photo Contest 2010. (Credit: David Mencin (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Grand Prismatic Spring. Winner in the EGU Photo Contest 2010. (Credit: David Mencin, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Imaggeo on Mondays: Landslide on the Cantabrian coastline

Shimmering blue seas, rocky outcrops and lush green hills sides; this idyllic landscape is punctuated by a stark reminder that geohazards are all around us. Irene Pérez Cáceres, a PhD student at the University of Granada (Spain) explains the geomorphology behind this small scale landslide on the Asturian coastline.

Landslide on the Cantabrian Sea. Credit: Irene Pérez Cáceres (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Landslide on the Cantabrian Sea. Credit: Irene Pérez Cáceres (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

This picture was taken in May 2011 in the coast of Llanes (Asturias, Spain). I was living in Oviedo (Asturias, Spain) doing my Master in the structural geology of the Axial Zone of the Pyrenees. Thus, geomorphology and geohazards are not my specialty or area of expertise. However, the landslides are well known and studied in this region, and people from Asturias call them Argayos.

This argayo is situated in Niembru Mountain, over the San Antolín beach, constantly affected by waves and swell of tides of the Cantabrian Sea, and continuous rain typical in the region. It was defined as a rotational landslide with two fracture surfaces, possibly conjugated in wedge shape. It is approximately 50 meters high and 60 meters width at its base. The slide volume is calculated at 45000 m3. It is carved in quartzite altered by the water rain infiltration through crevices in the surface. The initial displacement was between 10 and 15 meters in the scar. Experts say this landslide is still active, moving and evolving continuously. It is an imminent risk for the swimmers, but it is very difficult to control it, due to the size and the slope, and the technical requirements to stabilize the rock. On the other side of this mountain, further landslides are evident, as a result of the building of a road.

These natural geomorphological processes are very common in the north of Spain, mainly in riverbeds, as well in other nearby beaches. The main causes are the abundant (and sometimes heavy) rainfall, the typically clay rich soils, steep slopes, building works that destabilize the slopes, and the absence of vegetation in some areas. They vary in in size and volume, and can sometimes have important material consequences and can pose a significant risk for the local inhabitants. The annual economic cost for repairing the damage caused by these processes is estimated to be 66 million of euros in this region.

Studies carried out in the Department of Geology of the University of Oviedo (Mª José Domínguez and her group), indicate that 70% of the landslides in Asturias happen when it rains over 200 mm during over a period of a minimum of three days. Research has also been carried out to try and predict when landslides might happen, examining numerous landslides over the last 20 years approximately. It seems that one conditioning factor is the exact location of new buildings, being that ancient constructions used to be in secure zones, probably because people observed more minutely to the nature, but the new ones are more vulnerable.

To conclude, detailed geological and geomorphological studies are always recommended to carry out before constructions. Thereby it is possible to minimise this common geohazard in Asturias.

By Irene Pérez Cáceres, PhD Student, Granada University.

 

If you pre-register for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: A solitary floating island

With 2014 officially named the hottest year on record, there is evidence of the effects of rising global temperatures across the globe. The solitary, shimmering iceberg in today’s Imaggeo on Mondays photograph is a reminder that one of the best places to look for evidence of change is in glaciers. Daniela Domeisen tells the story of this lonely frozen block of ancient ice.

Iceberg on Tasman glacier lake. Credit: Daniela Domeisen (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Iceberg on Tasman glacier lake. Credit: Daniela Domeisen (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The picture shows an iceberg on Tasman glacier lake in the Southern Alps of New Zealand, in the centre of Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park. The lake consists of melt water from the Tasman glacier, which calves into the lake at its far end. The glacier is one of the largest in New Zealand and flows along New Zealand’s highest peaks, Mt Tasman and Mt Cook.

As most glaciers on Earth, the glaciers in Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park are retreating at a fast pace. The lower parts of the Tasman glacier are at less than 1000m above sea level and are therefore melting especially fast. The Tasman glacier lake has formed over the past two to three decades and has in the meantime reached a length of several kilometers. It is projected to almost double in size as the glacier retreats further.

Icebergs constantly calve from the Tasman glacier into the lake and drift down the lake, driven by a weak current towards the lake’s outflow while melting in the process. The ice contained in the icebergs is several thousand years old, beautifully transparent and clean when looking at a single piece of it.

The pictured iceberg was about 10 meters wide. From its shape, and melting pattern, it is likely that it had turned to its side after calving into the lake. With some force it was possible to tip the smaller icebergs and see a shiny blue surface which had been beautifully polished by the water.

On the lake, everything was completely peaceful and quiet, except for the distant sound of a continuous rippling and trickling coming from the moraines on the sides of the lake, as pictured in the background of the photo. Stones and rocks of various sizes slid down and fell into the lake as the ice inside the moraines melted in the bright, sunny and warm January weather.

The changes which are observed in most places as a result of the changing climate are often either too slow to be observed or invisible to the naked eye. The glacier, its lake and icebergs, however, are continuously changing, and a couple of hours spent on the water give a lively impression of a quiet place where things are changing fast enough to be able to observe a notable difference between the time one enters and leaves the place. The beauty of the glacier and its lake with the glittering icebergs provide a spectacular glimpse of a transient place.

By Daniela Domeisen, Research Analyst, MarexSpectron, London

If you pre-register for the 2015 General Assembly (Vienna, 12 – 17 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! From 1 February up until 1 March, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences in competition for free registration to next year’s General Assembly!  These can include fantastic field photos, a stunning shot of your favourite thin section, what you’ve captured out on holiday or under the electron microscope – if it’s geoscientific, it fits the bill. Find out more about how to take part at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/photo-contest/information/.

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