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Imaggeo

Imaggeo on Mondays: counting stars

Imaggeo on Mondays: counting stars

This year’s imaggeo photo contest saw humdreds of great entries. Among the winning images was a stunning night-sky panorama by Vytas Huth. In today’s post, Vytas describes how he captured the image and how the remote location in Southern Germany is one of the few (in Europe) where it is still posssible to, clearly, image the Milk Way.

I took the image in October 2015, usually the last time of the year when it is possible to see the center of the Milky Way at night. It is a single exposure 50mm, f/1.8, iso6400, 6s and it was shot in the north-eastern German lowlands. Light pollution is little there since it is the least dense populated region of Germany with lakes and forests and clean fresh air. Many other areas of Central and Western Europe are heavily light polluted, and decent shots of the Milky Way can usually only be done high up in the mountains. Light pollution has been recognised as a problem since the early 80s and its adverse effects of light pollution affect human health, animal behavior and ecosystem functions.

However, even the area where this shot was taken is not free of light pollution, which can be seen by the orange glow at the bottom of the image resulting from nearby village lights. However, a proper amount of lighting is generally unneeded, with audits suggesting between 30-60 %. This indicates that a better managing of light not only reduces light pollution but also energy waste and greenhouse gas emissions.

Last, but not least, everyone I know loves to watch the stars. Dark night skies are a cultural heritage, that man has looked upon for thousands of years, used as a calendar to prepare sowing and harvest or to navigate ships around the world’s oceans. For these reasons I believe that it is equally important to preserve dark skies as much as other elements of nature.

To put it into Bill Watterson’s words (creator of the famous comic series Calvin and Hobbes): “If people sat outside and looked at the stars each night I bet they would live a lot differently.”

By Vytas Huth, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research, University of Rostock, Germany

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Coastal erosion

Imaggeo on Mondays: Coastal erosion

Coastlines take a battering from stormy seas, gales, windy conditions and every-day wave action. The combined effect of these processes shapes coastal landscapes across the globe.

In calm weather, constructive waves deposit materials eroded elsewhere and transported along the coast line via longshore-drift, onto beaches, thus building them up. Terrestrial material, brought to beaches by rivers and the wind, also contribute.  In stormy weather, waves become destructive, eroding material away from beaches and sea cliffs.

In some areas, the removal of material far exceeds the quantity of sediments being supplied to sandy stretches, leading to coastal erosion. It is a dynamic process, with the consequences depending largely on the geomorphology of the coast.

Striking images of receding coastlines, where households once far away from a cliff edge, tumble into the sea after a storm surge, are an all too familiar consequence of the power of coastal erosion.

In sandy beaches where dunes are common, coastal erosion can be managed by the addition of vegetation. In these settings, it is not only the force of the sea which drives erosion, but also wind, as the fine, loose sand grains are easily picked-up by the breeze, especially in blustery weather.

Grasses, such as the ones pictured in this week’s featured imaggeo image, work by slowing down wind speeds across the face of the dunes and trapping and stabilising wind-blown sands. The grasses don’t directly prevent erosion, but they do allow greater accumulation of sands over short periods of time, when compared to vegetation-free dunes.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Glacier de la Pilatte

Imaggeo on Mondays: Glacier de la Pilatte

The relentless retreat of glaciers, globally, is widely studied and reported. The causes for the loss of these precious landforms are complex and the dynamics which govern them difficult to unravel. So are the consequences and impacts of reduced glacial extent atop the world’s high peaks, as Alexis Merlaud, explains in this week’s edition of Imaggeo on Mondays.

This picture was taken on 20 August 2009 at the Pilatte Hutt (44.87° N, 6.33° E,  2572 m.a.s.l.), located in the massif des Ecrins in the French Alps. It shows the Pilatte Glacier, which  was recently described as being 2.64km2 wide and 2.6 km long.

As most of the glaciers in the world, the Pilatte Glacier has been retreating over the last decades as can be seen from the two pictures in figure 1, taken respectively in 1921 and 2003, and from quantitative measurements since the 19th century. The glacier has lost 1.8 km since the end of the Little Ice Age (1850).

Figure 1: Retreat of the Pilatte Glacier over the last decades (pictures adapted from Bonet et al, 2005, time series from Reynaud and Vincent, 2000).

Figure 1: Retreat of the Pilatte Glacier over the last decades (pictures adapted from Bonet et al, 2005, time series from Reynaud and Vincent, 2000).

Two climatic variables affect glacier extents in opposite directions: the amount of winter precipitations (which accumulates snow converting to ice on the glacier) and the summer temperatures (which determines the melting altitude and thus the glacier ablation area – the zone where ice is lost from the glacier, commonly via melting).

The initial retreat of the Alpine glaciers in the 19th century can’t be explained by summer temperatures which remained stable until the 20th century. It has thus been explained by a reduction in snowfall . On the other hand, a recent study suggests that industrial black carbon could have triggered the end of the little ice age in Europe, by reducing the glaciers’albedo. But the globally observed glacier retreat from the 20th century is attributed to the increasing summer temperatures.

Figure 2: Global mean temperature series (Oerlemans, 2005, supporting online material)

Figure 2: Global mean temperature series (Oerlemans, 2005, supporting online material)

Understanding the relationship between glacier dynamics and climate enables to use glacier extents  as proxies to reconstruct global temperature time series, as was done by Oerlemans (2005). Using 169 glacier across the globe, this study provided independent evidences on the timing and magnitude of the warming, that are useful to corroborate other time series obtained through other proxies (such as tree rings) or by direct temperature measurements (see Figure. 2), all showing a temperature increase by around 0.5K across the 20th century.

Glaciers continued to retreat in the 20th century, at an accelerating rate. In the 2015 foreword of the Bulletin of the World Glacier Monitoring Service, its director Michael Zemp writes: “The record ice loss of  the 20thcentury, observed in 1998, was exceeded in 2003, 2006, 2011, 2013, and probably again in 2014 (based on the ‘reference’ glacier sample)”. Using climate models, it appears now possible to distinguish an increasing anthropogenic signature in this phenomenon.

Figure 3: Average glacier retreat worldwide from 1980 in mm of water equivalent (mm.w.e), a unit representing the average thickness of a glacier (WGMS website)

Figure 3: Average glacier retreat worldwide from 1980 in mm of water equivalent (mm.w.e), a unit representing the average thickness of a glacier (WGMS website)

One of the many problems caused by glaciers depletion is the impact on water supplies: glaciers are huge reservoirs of fresh water and their vanishings affect drinking water stock and irrigation for the neighboring population. In the Alps, the idea of replacing the glaciers by dams is already studied. This solution would probably be more difficult to implement in other parts of the world, such as in nothern Pakistan, an area covered with over 5000 glaciers, whose melting is already problematic, causing in particular severe floods.

 

By Alexis Merlaud, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels, Belgium

References

Bonet, R., Arnaud, F., Bodin, X., Bouche, M., Boulangeat, I., Bourdeau, P., … Thuiller, W. (2015). Indicators of climate: Ecrins National Park participates in long-term monitoring to help determine the effects of climate change. Eco.mont (Journal on Protected Mountain Areas Research), 8(1), 44–52. http://doi.org/10.1553/eco.mont-8-1s44

Ravanel, L., Dubois, L., Fabre, S., Duvillard, P.-A., & Deline, P. (2015). The destabilization of the Pilatte hut (2577 m a.s.l. – Ecrins massif, France), a paraglacial process? EGU General Assembly 2015, Held 12-17 April, 2015 in Vienna, Austria.  id.8720, 17.

Reynaud, L., Vincent, C., & Vincent, C. (2000). Relevés de fluctuations sur quelques glaciers des Alpes Françaises. La Houille Blanche, (5), 79–86. http://doi.org/10.1051/lhb/2000052

Pointer, T. H., Flanner, M. G., Kaser, G., Marzeion, B., VanCuren, R. A., & Abdalati, W. (2013). End of the Little Ice Age in the Alps forced by industrial black carbon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(38), 15216–21. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1302570110

Vincent, C., Le Meur, E., Six, D., & Funk, M. (2005). Solving the paradox of the end of the Little Ice Age in the Alps. Geophysical Research Letters, 32(9), L09706. http://doi.org/10.1029/2005GL022552

Oerlemans, J. (2005). Extracting a climate signal from 169 glacier records. Science (New York, N.Y.), 308(5722), 675–7. http://doi.org/10.1126/science.1107046

Farinotti, D., Pistocchi, A., Huss, M., al, A. A. et, Barnett T P, A. J. C. and L. D. P., Bavay M, L. M. J. T. and L. H., … Zemp M, H. W. H. M. and P. F. (2016). From dwindling ice to headwater lakes: could dams replace glaciers in the European Alps? Environmental Research Letters, 11(5), 054022. http://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/11/5/054022

Marzeion, B., Cogley, J. G., Richter, K., Parkes, D., Gregory, J. M., White, N. J., … Adams, W. (2014). Glaciers. Attribution of global glacier mass loss to anthropogenic and natural causes. Science (New York, N.Y.), 345(6199), 919–21. http://doi.org/10.1126/science.1254702

WGMS (2008): Global Glacier Changes: facts and figures. Zemp, M., Roer, I., Kääb, A., Hoelzle, M., Paul, F. and Haeberli, W. (eds.), UNEP, World Glacier Monitoring Service, Zurich, Switzerland: 88 pp

 

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/

Imaggeo on Mondays: A Bubbling Cauldron

Imaggeo on Mondays: A Bubbling Cauldron

Despite being a natural hazard which requires careful management, there is no doubt that there is something awe inspiring about volcanic eruptions. To see an erupting volcano up close, even fly through the plume, is the thing of dreams. That’s exactly what Jamie  Farquharson, a researcher at Université de Strasbourg (France) managed to do during the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Bárðarbunga. Read about his incredible experience in today’s Imaggeo on Monday’s post.

The picture shows the Holuhraun eruption and was taken by my wife, Hannah Derbyshire. It was taken from a light aircraft on the 11th of November of 2014, when the eruption was still in full swing, looking down into the roiling fissure. Lava was occasionally hurled tens of metres into the air in spectacular curtains of molten rock, with more exiting the fissure in steady rivers to cover the surrounding landscape.

Iceland is part of the mid-Atlantic ridge: the convergent boundary of the Eurasian and North American continental plates and one of the only places where a mid-ocean ridge rears above the surface of the sea. It’s situation means that it is geologically dynamic, boasting hundreds of volcanoes of which around thirty volcanic systems are currently active. Holuhraun is located in east-central Iceland to the north of the Vatnajökull ice cap, sitting in the saddle between the Bárðarbunga and Askja fissure systems which run NE-SW across the Icelandic highlands.

Monitored seismic activity in the vicinity of Bárðarbunga volcano had been increasing more-or-less steadily between 2007 and 2014. In mid-August 2014, swarms of earthquakes were detected migrating northwards from Bárðarbunga, interpreted as a dyke intruding to the east and north of the source. Under the ice, eruptions were detected from the 23rd of August, finally culminating in a sustained fissure eruption which continued from late-August 2014 to late-February of the next year.

My wife and I were lucky enough to have booked a trip to Iceland a month or so before the eruption commenced and, unlike its (in)famous Icelandic compatriot Eyjafjallajökull, prevailing wind conditions and the surprising lack of significant amounts of ash from Holuhraun meant that air traffic was largely unaffected.

At the time the photo was taken, the flowfield consisted of around 1000 million cubic metres of lava, covering over 75 square kilometres. After the eruption died down in February 2015, the flowfield was estimated to cover an expanse of 85 square kilometres, with the overall volume of lava exceeding 1400 million cubic metres, making it the largest effusive eruption in Iceland for over two hundred years (the 1783 eruption of Laki spewed out an estimated 14 thousand million cubic metres of lava).

Numerous “breakouts” could be observed on the margins of the flowfield as the emplacing lava flowfield increased in both size and complexity. Breakouts form when relatively hot lava, insulated by the cooled outer carapace of the flow, inflates this chilled carapace until it fractures and allows the relatively less-viscous (runnier) interior lava to spill through and form a lava delta. Gas-rich, low-viscosity magma often results in the emission of high-porosity (bubbly) lava. My current area of research examines how gases and liquids can travel through volcanic rock, a factor that is greatly influenced by the evolution of porosity during and after lava emplacement.

Flying through the turbulent plume one is aware of a strong smell of fireworks or a just-struck match: a testament to the emission of huge volumes of sulphur dioxide from the fissure. Indeed, the Icelandic Met Office have since estimated that 11 million tons of SO2 were emitted over the course of the six-month eruption, along with almost 7 million tons of CO2 and vast quantities of other gases such as HCl. These gases hydrate and oxidise in the atmosphere to form acids, in turn leading to acid rain. The environmental impact of Holuhraun as a gas-rich point source is an area of active research.

By Jamie Farquharson, PhD researcher at Université de Strasbourg (France)

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

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