Imaggeo on Mondays: Get involved!

Imaggeo on Mondays: Get involved!

Today’s featured image is a throw back to our 2016 General Assembly! Did you enjoy this year’s 619 unique scientific sessions and 321 side events at conference? Did you know that EGU members and conference attendees can play an active role in shaping the scientific programme of the conference? It is super easy! You can suggest a session (with conveners and description), and/or modifications to the existing skeleton programme sessions. So, if you’ve got a great idea for a session for the 2017 conference, be it oral, poster or PICO, be sure to submit it before this Friday, 9th September!

But helping us prepare the next General Assembly is not the only way you can have a say in EGU activities over the coming weeks. The EGU’s Autumn Elections are coming up too and we need your help to identify suitable candidates for vacancies as Division Presidents and Treasurer. Until the 15th of September you can nominate candidates for the positions. Think you’ve got it takes to have a go at the role? Then you are also welcome to nominate yourself!

Finally, did you know that as part of its ‘science for policy’ programme, the EGU is creating a database to identify expertise within the Union that can be used in policy-related events of geoscientific relevance, for example, submitting response texts to the European Parliament’s calls for expert advice? Please register if you have an interest in policy and want to participate more in the science policy process. By registering for this database you may be emailed from time to time with requests to respond to specific events.

For other EGU related news, why not visit our news pages, or catch up on the latest via our monthly newsletter (which you can receive direct to your inbox, simply sig up!)?

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at


GeoTalk: Raffaele Albano, Early Career Scientist Representative

GeoTalk: Raffaele Albano, Early Career Scientist Representative

In addition to the usual GeoTalk interviews, were we highlight the work and achievements of early career researchers, over the next few months we’ll be introducing the Division early career scientist representatives (ECS). They are responsible for ensuring that the voice of EGU ECS membership is heard. From organising short courses during the General Assembly, through to running Division Blogs and attending regular ECS representative meetings, their tasks in this role are varied.  Their role is entirely voluntary and they are all active members of their research community, so we’ll also be touching on their scientific work during the interview.

Today we are talking to Raffaele Albano, ECS representative for the Natural Hazard Division.

Before we get stuck in, could you introduce yourself and tell us a little more about yourself and your career?

Water, landscapes and nature have played an important role in my life as engineer, as I work to understand how they interact with one another and how they impact humans. As a citizen, I  also strive to build an awareness of my surroundings. Currently, I’m a research associate at University of Basilicata (Italy) and I’m co-founder of the Wat-TUBE spin-off devoted to the technology transfer of research results. I also love arts and historical heritages. I cultivate this passion as a volunteer in the UNESCO Young Italian Commission.

During my education and professional experience my curiosity has driven my passion for research and innovation. Therefore, I’m strongly motivated to research ideas to be converted into innovative actions which can lead to positive changes in our society. In particular, my aim is not only to develop and disseminate knowledge, but to also manage and enhance the results to build sustainable technologies.My main research interests revolve around developing models (mainly open-source software) to support flood and drought risk management.

The pluvial flood, July 2016, in Matera (South Italy), nominated European Capital of Culture 2019. The ancient system of tanks in the Sassi of Matera, in which rainwater is collected and accumulated with extreme care. The tanks are an outstanding example of an architectural system, unique engineering and landscape, leading them to be listed as World Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO. In 1927 this water resource management system was replaced by the Sele Aqueduct.

The pluvial flood, July 2016, in Matera (South Italy), nominated European Capital of Culture 2019. The ancient system of tanks in the Sassi of Matera, in which rainwater is collected and accumulated with extreme care. The tanks are an outstanding example of an architectural system, unique engineering and landscape, leading them to be listed as World Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO. In 1927 this water resource management system was replaced by the Sele Aqueduct.

Although we touch upon it in the introduction of this post: what does your role as ECS representative involve?

The ECS community makes up a significant proportion of the EGU membership and, furthermore, ECSs have different needs compared to more established scientists. Therefore, it is important that young members know that they have an important role to play within the Natural Hazard (NH) Division and, in general, in EGU activities. With this in mind, my key responsibility, as ECS representative, is to serve as a link between ECSs and the NH Division. In my role, I want to encourage ECS involvement and active participation in the EGU activities, in particular, during the General Assembly (GA).

I think that ECS Representatives should look at short-term benefits that spur momentum and long-term challenge in engaging young members using their enthusiasm and creativity in shaping an open and better geoscientific community.

I stay in close contact with the NH division president, Prof. Giorgio Boni, and also with some of the science officers in order to be involved in all the activities that concern ECSs (e.g. meetings, conferences, short courses, awards, social activities, and so on), both during the General Assembly and throughout the year. Indeed, as well as several activities organized during EGU 2016, this year, the NH Division has developed a presence on Facebook and Twitter. These are managed by the social media coordinator, Jackson Teller, (who is an ECS member). Moreover, the NH Division plans to propose a call among ECSs to implement and manage a division blog.

Finally, I participate in the regular Skype meetings with the ECS-reps from the other divisions in which we can exchange information, feedback and points of view that could be useful to bring it both to the EGU’s Program Committee and to each Divisions.

Why did you put yourself forward for the role?

At the EGU GA 2016, there were 13650 participants, of which 25% were students and 53% ECSs. It is clear that with so many ECS members, there is an enormous potential to increase ECS involvement, including them contributing at the division and council level. Moreover, typically, new papers, new ideas, new methods, come from the ECS community. Therefore, supporting and promoting, even small contributions for the ECS community (e.g. awards, travel grants, education activities, and other key information), can make a huge difference to young scientists’ careers and, indeed, for the future of the geosciences. It is a nice challenge to provide a real opportunity to re-think the role of ECS from simple consumers to contributors to the NH community .My motto is: Be open, be tuned, get inspired!

What is your vision for the EGU ECS Natural Hazard community and what do you hope to achieve in the time you hold the position?

NH is one of the biggest divisions in the EGU community. Moreover, the division is, by nature, diverse and multidisciplinary. Hence, it is a hard challenge to increase the links between members from different disciplines and backgrounds (e.g. engineering, geologists, sociologists, economists, remote sensing, and so on) in order to exploit its full richness. In this context, a key responsibility of the ECS Representative is to be receptive and responsive to the input provided by the members, creating an atmosphere of openness and inclusion which makes the scientific community more accessible to ECSs. Current goals include enhanced networking opportunities and organisation of short courses, but I believe there are other opportunities that reach far beyond these immediate needs. In this light, I call for more conversation on how the scientific community could be more accessible to ECS and on how ECS members can get organised and make the best use of available opportunities getting more involved in the union. I hope ECSs re-think Geosciences as open process of collaboration, sharing, exchange of ideas and skills in inspired way.

During the EGU 2016, I organised a meeting to which I invited scientists embarking on a career in natural hazards to share their research challenges, results on outreach efforts, and others forms of sciences that involve art, education, policy making, funding and so on. The outcome of the meeting was that we builta team of enthusiastic and motivated PhDs and post-docs who will work to build the NH Division ECS community, informally known as, NhET (Natural hazard Early career scientists Team). We will evaluate objectives, define goals, and create opportunities for ECSs to get involved in the NH scientific and professional community and within theEGU. In my vision, it could become the reference association for all the ECSs that work in this field and could work closely with national scientific associations, (in the field of NH).

Meet the team which makes up NhET (Natural hazard Early career scientists Team).

Meet the team which makes up NhET (Natural hazard Early career scientists Team).

What can your ECS Division members expect from the Natural Hazard Division in the 2017 General Assembly?

I encourage all ECSs to collaborate with the NhET team in the organisation of sessions, short course and other outreach activities. At EGU 2017, we plan to promote and publicised sessions and activities of relevance to ECS, such as the NH Division meeting, ECS Forum, and so on. In addition we will support the organisation of the incoming activities (in particular sessions and topical meeting on open data, models and publications, or geo-policy and other outreach emerging topics). Among the numerous activities that we are planning for EGU 2017, we will organize a PICO session, (principally for ECSs), which will be a platform to share ideas, research challenges, outreach and education activities. We are also planning a short course on the open-source and open data model.

To keep up to date with all GA related developments I can suggest attendees check the EGU’s official social media and the EGU website and, in particular,  the pages  dedicated to ECSs and the NH Division page.

How can those wanting to, get involved with the EGU?
EGU has a long history of actively supporting ECSs by providing reduced conference fees, recognising outstanding students, and awarding travel grants. Moreover, the ECS Representatives are giving more visibility to this big community within the EGU. Hence, I invite ECSs to follow theNH Division on Facebook  and Twitter and you can also contact me via email.For more information you can also check the NH Division pages, where you can find job openings, information on awards, publications, meetings and much more. Stay tuned for the upcoming call for the creation of the NH blog.

To find out about all the early career events and activities at the General Assembly and throughout the year be sure to check the dedicated ECS website. There, you’ll also be able to find out who you’re Division ECS representative is, if you’d like to get in touch with them and become involved in the Union. The website also hosts a page full of useful resources for career development as well as a database of undergraduate and postgraduate courses spanning the geosciences across Europe.

GeoTalk: REcycle textile posters into useful products

GeoTalk: REcycle textile posters into useful products

Conference posters: Most scientists spend tens (if not hundreds) of working hours perfecting their conference poster. There’s not just the science to think about, but also the design, the flow, the images, the language… The list is endless. Once complete, you print it, roll it up and feed it into the protective poster tube. Then you travel to the conference venue, whereupon you ‘compete’ with other scientist trying to stand-out from the crowd and entice fellow attendees to stop by your presentation, if only for a few minutes.

And then it is over, almost as quickly as it started. You pack up your poster to take back to your institution, to languish amongst the pile of other posters in a corner of your office. Best case scenario, you’ll revisit the electronic version when presenting on the same subject again and rework some elements. In all likelihood, the few hours of glory in the poster hall will be the climax of hours of hard work!

What if you could breathe a longer life into your poster? One which would mean you’ll reach audiences you never expected, while transforming your work into a brand new, useful product?

Today we speak to Sandra de Vries, a former master student, who also crafts posters into wearable garments, breathing a new lease of life into your scientific findings.

It all starts with a textile poster – where your presentation is printed on fabric as opposed to paper – which Sandra then turns into anything from a tie, to a tote bag, through to a skirt! The designs come complete with QR Codes, which people can scan to access the original presentation.

First, could you introduce yourself and tell our readers a little more about your background.

Hi, everybody! As a water ambassador during my studies, and currently working as project developer for the Valorisation Program Deltatechnology and Water, my interest for the water sector has been growing for a couple of years now. That brought me to my new job, where I just started working as IHP-HWRP Committee Secretary.

I take special interest in supporting and increasing innovative solutions in the water sector and creating awareness for the importance of water (on a national as well as international level) for which I helped set up the initiative Team Helder Water. I like to tackle challenges by being creative and enthusiastic about the solutions possible.

During my Water Management master at the Delft University of Technology I conducted research in the Mara River Basin – Kenia, Jakarta – Indonesia, and Ostional – Nicaragua. I conducted this research in cooperation with UNESCO-IHE, Deltares, and the research institute CIRA in Managua – Nicaragua, respectively. Living, travelling, and working abroad has created an interest of discovering other cultures and working together with them on challenging and global issues.

Repost is your initiative to turn textile posters into useable items. How did you come up with this original idea?

What if your poster could become a handy tote bag? Credit: REpost/Sandra de Vries

What if your poster could become a handy tote bag? Credit: REpost/Sandra de Vries

It actually all comes back to my time as an EGU conference assistant, during EGU2014 and 2015. For my work in the poster areas we were asked to remove all left-behind posters every evening. These are quite a few, and surprisingly, some posters turned out to be printed on textile instead of paper. After the first evening of throwing away perfectly nice posters that were only used for two effective hours, I discussed with a friend the waste of material, time, but especially effort. As I had been designing and making  clothes of my own for a couple of years, I started joking about keeping some of the textile versions. “I could make a dress out of it and perhaps a beach bag for you!”, I exclaimed to my friend. So at the end of the next day, instead of throwing away the textile posters, I started collecting them. Beautiful pieces of research, all of them!

In the year after EGU2014 I did what I promised my friend, and chose two posters to become a beach bag and a dress. Again, in 2015 I joined as an assistant, and this time it was even better, I was working at the hydrology poster area. This gave me an even better possibility to collect textile posters, which often showed topics of my own interest! And during the Delft hydrology dinner in Vienna (every year organised by the division), I wore the dress made out of a poster from EGU2014. This resulted in really enthusiastic reactions, which only increased my own enthusiasm for the idea. After EGU2015 I created a couple of aprons which were used during the hydrology fieldwork of my master, and a pencil skirt for my own thesis defence. Of course with all topics matching that of my own thesis. And finally, I created the tie, a present for my supervisor Prof. Hubert Savenije.

Is the process of turning the posters into clothing items difficult? What does the process involve?

As you might imagine, posters are printed on a textile that is best compared to canvas. This is pretty stiff fabric, and for sure not everything can be made out of it. The first dress I made is actually the best example for this. I was not incredibly satisfied because the inflexible fabric did not allow for a nice fit. I also broke many a needle in my sewing machine, since the fabric is often thicker than normal fabric. So the product-possibilities depend on the type of fabric, and the thickness of the textile posters have thus far influenced my product choices.

The next step is like designing any other piece of clothes or accessories. You need to design a 2D-pattern that shows you which pieces of fabric you need to create a 3D product. In case of clothing, which naturally should also fit a person, one needs to take into account different clothing sizes.

You include QR codes in all the items you make, why is it such a unique feature?

The extra highlight of our product, especially interesting for researchers, is indeed the QR-code attached to the product. This QR-code redirects to the original poster of the author. Imagine the extra publicity you can create for your work in this manner!

Cutting up the poster in order to REmake it, can create a loss of the information contained in the poster. By including the QR-code we ensure to REpost the work to anybody who might be interested by what is shown on the clothing or accessories.

Which items have you enjoyed creating the most and why?

I still remember the first time people saw the beach bag I made for my friend. Everybody was enthusiastic, envying her for her new bag. This was very surprising for me, I had not expected that others would like the idea as much as I enjoyed it.

Sandra models her pencil skirt. Credit: REpost/ Sandra de Vries

Sandra models her pencil skirt. Credit: REpost/ Sandra de Vries

I am most proud of the pencil skirt I made. When I started creating it, I was not even sure if it would work out, and I wanted it to be perfect to use it for my own thesis defence. Eventually, it turned out to be great, and so original that I was asked by people where I bought it!

What next for REpost? Do you plan on pursuing this as a business where anyone can purchase items you’ve made?

Yes, definitely! It started out as a nice fun hobby and project. Now, after having talked to many people, I believe this has more potential than just keeping it for myself. Together with my sister Maria, we are finding ways to increase production, incorporate the QR-code and bring this to a higher level. To make it easier for you in the future, we’re actually in contact with conference organizers  to incorporate this choice into the digital registration procedure.

If this sounds interesting to you as a poster-author and you’re planning to print on textile, contact us via our email address or check our facebook page repost poster!

GeoEd: Career pathways and expectations in the geosciences – straight lines, wiggles and all out chaos.

GeoEd: Career pathways and expectations in the geosciences – straight lines, wiggles and all out chaos.

 ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ From a tender age, we are regularly asked that question, with answers ranging from the downright hilarious through to those kids who’ve got it all figured out. As we grow older the question of what career we want to pursue carries more weight and the outcome of our choices is scrutinised closely.  In today’s GeoEd column, Rhian Meara (a geography and geology lecturer at Swansea University), explores the notion that as young adults adapt to a changing working environment, it is ok to be unsure, to change your mind, and that pursuing the one-time holy grail, linear career path might no longer be a realistic expectation.

My role as a lecturer in the Geography Department at Swansea University includes participating in the university admissions process which includes organising and attending open and visit days, reading application forms and meeting with potential applicants and their parents. Time and time again, I’m asked about employability, work experience opportunities and career pathways – what sort of work will I get after graduation? What are the work experience opportunities? Should I go into post-graduate studies? Will the degree give me transferable skills? What if I choose not to work in the same field as my degree? Current and prospective students are under immense pressure to know what they want to do with their lives from an early age and often feel like failures if they don’t have a “plan”.  And as tuition fees continue to rise, the idea of having a post-graduation “plan” to justify the expense of higher education is becoming more and more important.

The inspiration for this post came after a recent school visit, where most of the students were 16 years old and had no idea what they wanted to study or even if they wanted to go to university. My colleague and I discussed these issues with the students and answered their questions. We explained our backgrounds, what we had studied and how we had gotten to where we are now. My colleague and I had been to the same high school and were now both lecturers at the same university, but our paths in between have been completely different.

Many of us grew up with the “straight line plan”. That is:

Finish school → Go to university (complete PG qualification) → Get a Career → Retire.

Where a university qualification should (in theory) guarantee you a job and a career in your chosen field until retirement. This plan or route is characteristic of our parents’ generation. My contemporaries and I came into play towards the end of the “straight line plan” era, we went to university with grand expectations of long term employment, careers and success in our chosen fields. However, the onset of the international banking crisis in the late 2000s, meant that despite our hard work, many of us found ourselves last in and first out. No job, no career, no funding. And so we began to think outside the box. We used our skills, knowledge, talents and contacts to develop our own jobs, our own careers and our own pathways. Some have carved out career pathways that have stayed relatively similar to the original straight line plan, while others have wiggled around a bit, gaining new skills and experiences from a wide range of opportunities. Being open to new ideas has allowed us to develop our own pathways and to succeed. Below are four examples of how career pathways have developed for my contemporaries and I.

Jo: the industrial straight linerhi_1

Jo is a classic straight liner. Jo graduated with a BSc in Applied and Environmental Geology and gained employment in the Hydrocarbon industry, where she has worked for the past ten years in geosteering. However, due to the current down turn in oil production, Jo has been made redundant. While Jo is investigating what to do next, she has been undertaking a part-time MSc and is open to the idea of moving sideways into a new field which would utilize the transferable skills she gained during her geosteering work.

Rhian: the academic wiggler


This is me! I am an academic wiggler! I initially followed a straight line career; I graduated with an MGeol in Geology and completed a PhD focussing on physical volcanology and geochemistry. I decided that academia wasn’t for me and wiggled sideways into science communication working for an international science festival both in Scotland and in the United Arab Emirates. While I loved the communication work, I felt I had to give academia one more chance and I went back to complete a one year post doc in tephrochronology. Although the post doc confirmed that a career in scientific research wasn’t for me, I discovered the teaching-focussed academic pathway where I could use my communication skills. I’ve now been teaching for four years. The figure above has a two way arrow between teaching and science communicating as I’m still involved with communication and do outreach, accessibility work and TV / radio work to promote my subject whenever possible. I have no major plans to leave my role in the near future, but academia can be a very fickle place. I am therefore continuing to develop my skills and interests to ensure that I am able to wiggle again should the need arise.

Laura: The wiggling communicator


Laura graduated with an MGeol in Geology and worked as an Environmental Consultant before returning to academia to complete a PhD in Geomagnetism. While completing her PhD, Laura began blogging about geosciences and her research and developed a passion for science communication and social media. Upon completion of her PhD, Laura gained employment at the European Geosciences Union as the Communications Officer, and is now responsible for managing and developing content for the EGU blogs, social media accounts, online forums and Early Career Researcher activities. Laura is a perfect example of how to use your interests, skills and passions to create new opportunities.

Kate: the chaotic accumulator

Kate is a chaotic accumulator, and I mean that in the best possible way. Kate is someone who tries everything and has developed a portfolio of transferable skills and interests from each experience.  Although slightly chaotic to the untrained eye, there are underlying themes in the figure above: Geography, Textiles and Education. Each job or qualification has built on one or more of those themes and in her current job as a university lecturer in Human Geography, Kate uses all three themes in her modules. There is an additional theme that does not show up on the figure: Language. Kate is a fluent Welsh speaker and in each position or qualification, the Welsh language has been central from museums to coaching to teaching to lecturing.rhi_4

And so in my future discussions with applicants and their parents, I will introduce the idea of straight lines, wiggles and all out chaos (although perhaps not in those exact words). I will explain that an undergraduate degree will train and prepare them, but that we should all be open to new opportunities and new experiences.

And as life becomes more complicated once again – the down turn in the oil industry, the impact of the UK leaving the EU, an overly qualified labour market – it’s becoming more important than ever for us all to adapt, to think outside the box, to wiggle.

By Rhian Meara, Geology & Geography Lecturer at Swansea University.


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