Join us at EGU 2017: Call-for-abstracts is now open!

Join us at EGU 2017: Call-for-abstracts is now open!

From now, up until 11 January 2017, you can submit your abstract for the upcoming EGU General Assembly (EGU 2016).

In addition to established scientists, PhD students and other early career researchers are welcome to submit abstracts to present their research at the conference. Further, the EGU encourages undergraduate and master students to submit abstracts on their dissertations or final-year projects.

The EGU recognises that there are many outstanding students who would benefit from attending and presenting at the General Assembly and, therefore, provides a discounted registration rate to this group. Interested undergraduates can apply to present a poster, talk or PICO presentation on research undertaken in a laboratory setting, on a mapping or field project they’ve been involved in during their degrees, or any other research project of relevance.

Browse through the EGU 2017 sessions. Clicking on ‘please select’ will allow you to search for sessions by Programme Group and submit your abstract to the relevant session either as plain text, LaTeX, or a MS Word document. Further guidelines on how to submit an abstract are available on the EGU 2017 website.

An innovative presentation format – Presenting Interactive Content, better known as PICO – has been implemented at the General Assembly since 2013. PICO sessions bring together the advantages of both oral and poster sessions, allowing authors to present the essence of their work and follow it up with interactive discussion. Please note that some sessions are ‘PICO only’ sessions, meaning you cannot select oral/poster preference. If you are submitting to a PICO only session be sure to check out our PICO guide, for tips on how to prepare your presentation.

The deadline for the receipt of abstracts is 11 January 2017, 13:00 CET. If you would like to apply for financial support to attend the 2017 General Assembly, please submit an application no later than 01 December 2016. We’ll be providing further information about how to apply for travel grants and how they are awarded in a forthcoming post.

EGU 2017 will take place from 23 to 28 April 2017 in Vienna, Austria. For more information on the General Assembly, see the EGU 2017 website and follow us on Twitter (#EGU17 is the conference hashtag) and Facebook.

NB: We strongly recommend booking accommodation for EGU2017 as soon as possible . The congress ECCIMD2017 (10,000 participants) will take place in Vienna at the same time as the EGU2017. In addition, the Vienna City Marathon (40,000 participants) will take place on Sunday, resulting in many hotels being fully booked the night before.

Celebrating Earth Science Week!

Celebrating Earth Science Week!

For those not so familiar with the Earth sciences, geosciences and all its subdisciplines might be shrouded in mystery:  boring, unfathomable, out of reach and with little relevance to everyday life. Nothing could be further from the truth!

Earth Science Week, an international annual celebration founded by the American Geosciences Institute in 1998, aims to change the public’s perception of the geosciences.  Since 2011, the London Geological Society also hosts a range of events and activities to raise awareness and better understanding of the Earth sciences.

In 2016, Earth Science Week takes place between 8 and16 October. For the first time, the EGU will run events to mark the special date, all of which we invite you to take part in!

Earth Science Week Photo Competition

From Wednesday 5th to Friday 14th October submit an original photo on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary and space sciences to our open access image repository, Imaggeo.

For your image to be included in the competition be sure to include the tag #EarthSciWeek when prompted during the upload.

Upon the submission period closing, all entered images will be published to the EGU’s Facebook page. The photograph with most likes, as chosen by the public, will be crowned the competition winner.

The winner will get one free book of their choice from the EGU library and a pack of EGU goodies! We’ll also feature the top five most popular entries on our Instagram.

I’m a geoscientist – Ask me Anything: Live Twitter Q&As

Have you always wanted to know how glaciers move and carve out unbelievable landscapes? How about which emissions cause the most pollution? What are the benefits of publishing in an open access journal vs. a pay-walled publication? If politicians make all the decisions, how can we get them to take scientists more seriously?

If you’ve ever asked yourself these questions, stay tuned or, better still, take part in our daily Earth Science Week live #EGUchat with an EGU member on Twitter. Starting on Monday, every lunchtime, you’ll have the opportunity to put your questions to a range of scientists and EGU experts and discuss a variety of subjects.

Our very own Sarah Connors (@connors SL), the EGU’s Policy Fellow, will kick off a week, of what we hope will be fruitful discussions, by taking questions on all things science policy. Come Tuesday Emma Smith (@emma_c_smith) and Nanna Karlsson (@icymatters), Cryosphere Division Blog editors, will team up to shed light on the processes which operate in the iciest places on the planet.

Wednesday brings editor of the EGU’s open access journal Earth Surface Dynamics (ESurf) and Professor of Physical Geography at the University of Hull, Tom Coulthard (@Tom_Coulthard), who will shed light on the processes which shape our planet and the trials and tribulations of getting published.

If you are interested in natural hazards, how we mitigate, manage them and how they impact on our daily lives, then tune in to the chat on Thursday, where Giorgio Boni (@EguNHpresident), President of the Natural Hazards Division will be answering all your questions!

For the final chat of the week, we bring you Michelle Cain (@civiltalker), an atmospheric scientist and former Atmospheric Division Early Career Scientist Representative. Michelle will be taking questions on gaseous emissions and topics related to the Earth’s atmosphere.

Joining the conversation couldn’t be easier! To put your questions to our experts follow the hashtag #EGUchat on Twitter. Not on twitter or aren’t available during the chats? Not to worry, send us your questions in the comments below or via Twitter, Facebook or Instagram: we’ll ask the experts on your behalf.earth_sci_week_ama_twitter-01


Educators: Apply now to take part in the 2017 GIFT workshop!

Bathymetry, volcanoes (green triangles), and earthquakes in the Mediterranean area. SubMap: Arnauld Heuret, Jérôme Losq and Serge Lallemand

Bathymetry, volcanoes (green triangles), and earthquakes in the Mediterranean area. SubMap: Arnauld Heuret, Jérôme Losq and Serge Lallemand

The General Assembly is not only for researchers but for teachers and educators with an interest in the geosciences also. Every year the Geosciences Information For Teachers (GIFT) is organised by the EGU Committee on Education to bring first class science closer to primary and high school teachers. The topic of the 2017 edition of GIFT is ‘The Mediterranean’. This year’s workshop is co-organised with the Italy’s National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) and will be taking place on 24–26 April 2017 at the EGU General Assembly in Vienna, Austria.

The Mediterranean is a key region for understanding the complexities and delicate relationships between civilization, natural processes, catastrophic events and protection of the environment. The region is densely populated with progressively increasing anthropogenic pressures, which, when combined with the peculiar geological setting, result in heightened vulnerability to climate change enhanced by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide. The workshop will explore most of these aspects, and will include a hands-on experience session.

Teachers from Europe and around the world can apply to participate in the 2017 edition of GIFT, and to receive a travel and accommodation stipend to attend the workshop, by November 15. Application information is available for download in PDF format, a document which also includes the preliminary programme of the workshop.

Not sure what to expect? More information about GIFT workshops can be found in the GIFT section of the EGU website. You can also take a look at a blog post about what participants could expect from the 2016 workshop and also learn what the workshop is like from a teacher’s perspective here. You might also find videos of the 2016 workshop useful too.

This calls for a celebration: GeoLog’s 1000 post!

This calls for a celebration: GeoLog’s 1000 post!

As far as blogging milestones go, today is pretty special. This is GeoLog’s 1000 post!

Since the EGU’s official blog launched back in March 2010 (that’s right, there’s over 6 years of back catalogue for you to enjoy!), we’ve shared posts about research spanning almost every discipline in the Earth sciences; highlighted member’s adventures in the field and showcased the work of outstanding early career scientist. We’ve not shied away from contentious topics and shone a light on some of the most fascinating processes which shape our planet, as well as bringing you the latest from our annual General Assembly.

To celebrate, we’ve come up with a list of some posts which highlight the diversity of content published in the blog over the past six and a half years. Because selecting the best of the blog would be too hard a task, we’ve chosen to feature some of the Executive Office’s favourite posts, as well as some of the most viewed posts since we started recording statistics about the blog back in 2012.

Bárbara Ferreira, the EGU’s Media and Communications Manager says “It’s hard to pick your favourites from amongst 1000 blog posts, published over 6.5 years of the EGU’s blog existence, so I will highlight a few ‘firsts’ instead.”

Imaggeo on Mondays is the longest running regular column on the blog, having started in February 2011. Weekly, we highlight a photo from the EGU’s open-access image repository, Imaggeo.

“The very first featured image was an asphalt volcano from the Gulf of Mexico,” explains Bárbara.

Not surprisingly, one of the most popular posts in GeoLog’s history is also an Imaggeo on Mondays post. Could it be any other way when the April 2013 post highlighted one of the most emblematic geological features in the world? Sarah Connors, the EGU’s Policy Fellow is also a fan of Imaggeo on Mondays.

Left: Asphalt volcano off the Gulf of Mexico . Credit: Marum. Right: href=""> Grand Prismatic spring . Credit: David Mencin (both images distributed via

Left: Asphalt volcano off the Gulf of Mexico . Credit: Marum. Right: Grand Prismatic spring . Credit: David Mencin (both images distributed via

“It gives me the opportunity to learn facts about research areas that differ from my own background (atmospheric chemistry). I particularly liked ‘A rolling stone gathers no moss’ which taught me about large shifting landmasses and what effects this can have on the surrounding rock (it can create swirls of different rock types),” explains Sarah.

Geosciences Columns cover recent research in the Earth, planetary and space sciences. Usually, but not always, the research featured is published in one of our open access journals, and presented in a language that is accessible to all. November 2011 was the birth-month of this popular series and featured research about how the Vikings used a transparent variety of calcite, called Iceland spar, to navigate.

“Managing the EGU’s social media presence is one of my [Laura Roberts, EGU Communications Officer] tasks, so I’m always interested in learning what applications social media might have in the context of the Earth sciences. A Geosciences Column published back in February 2013 is one of my favourites as it showcases how social networks to respond to earthquakes.”

Fast forward to July 2012 and another of our long-established columns got underway: GeoTalk, featuring a short Q&A with a geoscientist, often an early career scientist (ECS).

“We started with an interview with Guillermo Rein about his research on the largest fires on Earth and how they contribute to greenhouse gas emissions,” says Bárbara, and adds “all three columns [GeoTalk, Geosciences Columns and Imaggeo on Mondays] are ongoing to this day.”

More recently, Sarah (Policy Fellow) started our newest column: GeoPolicy, which focuses on informing the scientific community on European policy, the scientists contributing to this process, and how other researchers could play a role in influencing policy making.

“So far, it’s been a great experience and I’ve got to write about some interesting topics. I think my favourite post is the ‘How to communicate science to policy officials – tips and tricks from the experts’, which covers a science policy session at the EGU General Assembly 2016. The post summarises key communication tips for researchers wanting to engage with policy officials,” describes Sarah.

While preparing this post we realised our readers enjoy discovering more about subjects which are timely and ‘hot’ at the time of publication. A post about Iceland’s Bárðarbunga-Holuhraun and its remarkable volcanic eruption, which went live not long after the eruption and showcased new research presented at our General Assembly, is among the most popular on the blog. Tapping into slightly niche subjects also proved a hit among the GeoLog audience. Who knew a story about spitfires and geophysical archaeology in Burma would be our most read post ever?

GeoLog is also a place to find resources on all things related to career, science communication, academic writing and personal development. We’ve featured how-to-guides on how to apply for research grants, prepare for your next interview and most recently how to pitch your research to a journalist. Among the most popular posts on the blog is one packed with tips and tricks on how to prepare THE best job application.

It wouldn’t be fair to celebrate this special occasion without sending a big thank you to all our guest authors, who over the past six and a bit years have contributed a range of informative, entertaining and insightful posts. We always welcome guest contributions, so if you would like to submit a post, please do get in touch!

Last, but absolutely not least, a big thank you to all our readers! We hope you continue to enjoy GeoLog. Here is to the next 1000 posts!


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