GeoLog

EGU

GeoPolicy: An overview of EU funding for the Earth, atmosphere, and space sciences

GeoPolicy: An overview of EU funding for the Earth, atmosphere, and space sciences

Are you thinking of applying for funding? Or are you considering a career in academia and want to know where your research funding could come from? The European Union (EU) has large financial resources available for academic scientific research and innovation (R&I). This is in addition to national government funding bodies. This blog post, the 5th in the EGU’s GeoPolicy series, introduces R&I funding policies in the EU, and lists the major funds available for EGU scientists.

The EU aims to ensure EU scientific research is at the forefront of knowledge discovery. EU member states are encouraged to invest 3% of their GDP by 2020 to provide funding for R&I. Its goals are to tackle the ‘challenges of our time’ (food security, energy demand, climate change, an aging population etc.) and to boost European economy through a single European Research Area [1].

The EU has a variety of interlinked programmes which offer funding for R&I. These are available to public and private sector organisations and total a staggering 130 billion euros. Funding for academics is primarily available through the Horizon 2020 (H2020) programme, although some other initiatives, which are sector focused, are also open to researchers. The figure below shows all EU R&I funding opportunities, and the amount each programme has to spend (in million euros).

 

 

H2020 is by far the largest available funding resource for EGU academics. Some specific areas of EGU science have additional funding sources available. These include:

  • Space: There are two programmes which offer funding for space related activities (in addition to H2020). The Galileo initiative aims to improve global satellite navigation, with the intention of launching over 300 satellites around Earth by 2020. Funding is available for R&I into the development of ‘fundamental elements of the satellite system’ i.e. electrical components. The Copernicus programme provides ‘accurate and reliable information and data in the field of environment and security’ using both satellites and in-situ equipment. Funding is available for the development of Earth observation techniques.
  • Agriculture & forestry: The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development provides grants for those performing research and innovation activities in the fields of agriculture, food production, and forestry.
  • Research networks: The European Social Fund can be used for ‘the training of researchers and to support networking between research institutions’.

As a side note the EU also indirectly provides funding for students through the Erasmus+ scheme to relocate ‘in the pursuit of education and training opportunities’. [2]

H2020

H2020 offers funding for successful applications that meet some of their policy objectives. There is little under 75 billion euros available for R&I. The H2020 subsections which are relevant to EGU scientists are listed below:

How to apply

The video below gives a basic introduction to applying for H2020 funding. [3]

Funding for research grants (i.e. from the ERC or a Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant) is done through the Participant Portal. This is where scientists can submit a research proposal of their own design. Alternatively, funding for specific projects, proposed by the EU, can be applied for through the Calls for Proposals webpages. Calls are uploaded to this website throughout the running of H2020 (2014-2020) so it is worth regularly checking for recently postings. [4]

The application process involves submitted proposals to be evaluated by academic and industrial experts, rather than European Commission employees. More information about the application process can be found here. Academics who wish to apply as a registered expert to review research proposals can find more information here.

Edit: The Marie Curie Alumni Association website lists 10 direct links where european research funding can be found.

Sources used for this blog post

[1] – http://europa.eu/pol/rd/

[2] – http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/BRIE/2015/568327/EPRS_BRI(2015)568327_EN.pdf

[3] – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmN0NccQCD0

[4] – http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/portal/desktop/en/home.html

 

GeoTalk: Lena Noack, Early Career Scientist Representative

GeoTalk: Lena Noack, Early Career Scientist Representative

In addition to the usual GeoTalk interviews, where we highlight the work and achievements of early career researchers, over the next few months we’ll be introducing the Division early career scientist representatives (ECS). They are responsible for ensuring that the voice of EGU ECS membership is heard. From organising short courses during the General Assembly, through to running Division Blogs and attending regular ECS representative meetings, their tasks in this role are varied. Their role is entirely voluntary and they are all active members of their research community, so we’ll also be touching on their scientific work during the interview.

Today we are talking to Lena Noack , ECS representative for the Planetary and Solar System Sciences (PS) Division and upcoming Union-wide ECS Representative (as of April 2016).

Before we get stuck in, could you introduce yourself and tell us a little more about yourself and your career?

I am currently a post-doc at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. I studied Mathematics in Germany at the Humboldt-University of Berlin, but discovered soon that I would prefer to work in a field that was my hobby for a long time – astrophysics! I found a PhD position at the German Aerospace Center at the Institute of Planetary Research in Berlin, where I could work for four years on the simulation of plate tectonics on Earth-like planets and the general evolution of terrestrial bodies in our Solar System and beyond. My post-doc position in Belgium allows me to pursue this fascinating topic.

Although we touch upon it in the introduction of this post: what does your role as ECS representative involve?

Apart from being the voice of the ECS in my division, for me the task of the ECS representative involves a wide range of other activities, both during the General Assembly and during the whole year. Luckily, my division doesn’t lack enthusiastic PhD students and post-docs, and we organize different events during the EGU and the related EPSC (Earth and Planetary Science Congress) like short courses and competitions, or this year for the first time also a smaller workshop directly dedicated to ECS. We are also responsible for the division’s outreach activities (via the EGU-PS website, the division Facebook page and a twitter account).

Why did you put yourself forward for the role?

My involvement as ECS representative actually started with organising the division’s Outstanding Student Poster award. In this function I started to communicate with other ECS (obtaining also feedback in this way and forwarding it to the PS president). Since I was also interested in different ideas on how to improve the networking between division ECS’s and the division outreach activities, the role of the ECS representative came quite naturally to me.

SONY DSC

What is your vision for the EGU ECS PS community and what do you hope to achieve in the time you hold the position?

Sadly my time as ECS PS representative will come to an end during the next General Assembly (the call for candidates to put themselves forward for the role of PS Division ECS Rep will be opening soon, so keep a look out for that if this is an opportunity you might be interested in!).

Future activities I could imagine include division internal networking events directly at the GA (for example a PS social event in the evening) and more ECS workshops organised outside of the GA. Also as I take on the role of EGU-wide ECS representative in April.

What can your ECS Division members expect from the PS Division in the 2016 General Assembly?
Apart from our usual tasks, including for example a flyer with all important ECS-related activities during the GA, as well as ECS-convened PICO sessions and interesting short courses co-organized with the other divisions, we have a special “bonbon” for the PS division this year. The annual GIFT workshop, bringing teachers to the GA to interact with scientists and for education-related session, will be co-organized in 2016 by the PS division. Under this header, we are organisinge a new contest (SECreT – Scientific Easy Creative Texting), to which every interested scientist can contribute by submitting a short (max 1 page), entertaining, but also informative texts about their research, which will be made available to all GIFT attendants. The contest is of interest to all ECS that want to share their work with non-scientists, and of course there will be awards!

How can those wanting to, get involved with the EGU?

Every ECS related to the PS division is very welcome to get more involved within our division. The easiest way is to get in contact with anyone of the ECS PS group at the GA, or to drop me an e-mail before. Our Facebook page can also be used to contact us, since the page is hosted by the ECS group of the PS division. Also, in 2016 our division is searching for a new ECS representative. If you are interested in that position, best to join the ECS PS group now! To apply as a candidate for the ECS PS representative, you only need to write an e-mail confirming your participation to the PS president Ozgur Karatekin and myself.

Abstract deadline for EGU 2016 fast approaching: A first-timer’s guide to the 2015 General Assembly

Abstract deadline for EGU 2016 fast approaching: A first-timer’s guide to the 2015 General Assembly

Are you considering attending the upcoming EGU General Assembly in Vienna? The conference brings together geoscientists from all over the world to one meeting covering all disciplines of the Earth, planetary and space sciences.. This year, the meeting will be held from the 17 to 22 April at the Austria Centre Vienna. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is upon us, closing next Wednesday the 13th January at 13:00 CET.

With 12,000 participants in a massive venue, the conference can be a confusing and, at times, overwhelming place. In addition, working out how the conference presentation slots are structured, how to submit an abstract and what happens after you have done isn’t always straight forward, especially if you are a first time attendee.

To help you find your way, we have compiled an introductory handbook filled with history, tips for submitting your abstract, presentation pointers, travel tips and a few facts about Vienna and its surroundings. Download your copy of the EGU General Assembly guide here!

Job opportunity at the EGU General Assembly: press assistant

Job opportunity at the EGU General Assembly: press assistant

We have a vacancy for an early career science communicator or science journalism student in Europe to work at the press office of the 2016 General Assembly, which is taking place in Vienna, Austria, from 17–22 April. Applications from geosciences students with science communication experience are also welcome. We are particularly interested in receiving applications from people with experience in photo and video reporting.

The student will join the team assisting the EGU press officer and the journalists at the press centre, and is expected to help run press conferences. Other possible tasks include reporting on the events at the Assembly through photographs and video, writing blog posts, and distributing EGU Today, the daily newsletter at the General Assembly.

This is a paid opportunity for an early career science communicator to gain experience in the workings of a press office at a major scientific conference, and to interact with journalists, freelance science writers and public information officers. Like the other media assistants at the conference, the successful candidate will receive €600 for the week and will be given support towards travel expenses.

The position is open to University students (final-year undergraduates or postgraduates) or recent graduates in science communication/journalism or to students in the Earth, planetary and space sciences with experience in science outreach. Applicants must have an expert command of English and good computer and internet skills.

Applications must include

  • Cover letter and CV (one page each) summarising relevant experience
  • Two samples of recent science communication work such as photo features, videos or written articles (published or unpublished, aimed at a general audience)

Application documents (in English) should be submitted by email in a single file to Bárbara Ferreira, the EGU Media and Communications Manager (media@egu.eu). Bárbara can also be contacted for informal enquiries. Please note that people who are presenting an abstract at the General Assembly are not eligible to apply.

The deadline for applications is 7 February 2016.

The European Geosciences Union (EGU, www.egu.eu) is Europe’s premier geosciences organisation, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. The EGU organises a General Assembly that attracts over 11,000 scientists each year, as well as reporters interested in hearing about the latest research in topics that range from volcanology and earthquakes to climate science, and from solar physics to planetary science.

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: