GeoLog

Conferences

Announcing the winners of the EGU Photo Contest 2017!

The selection committee received over 300 photos for this year’s EGU Photo Contest, covering fields across the geosciences. Participants at the 2017 General Assembly have been voting for their favourites throughout the week  of the conference and there are three clear winners. Congratulations to 2017’s fantastic photographers!

Penitentes in the Andes by Christoph Schmidt (distributed by imaggeo.egu.eu). This photo was taken in the Bolivian Andes at an altitude of around 4400 m. The climatic conditions favour the formation of so-called penitents, i.e. long and pointed remains of a formerly comprehensive snow field.

Symbiosis of fire, ice and water by Michael Grund (distributed by imaggeo.egu.eu). This picture was taken at Storforsen, an impressive rapid in the Pite River in northern Sweden.

Movement of the ancient sand by Elizaveta Kovaleva (distributed by imaggeo.egu.eu). In the Zion National Park you can literally touch and see the dynamic of the ancient sand dunes.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s online open access geosciences image repository. All geoscientists (and others) can submit their photographs and videos to this repository and, since it is open access, these images can be used for free by scientists for their presentations or publications, by educators and the general public, and some images can even be used freely for commercial purposes. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. Submit your photos at http://imaggeo.egu.eu/upload/.

Science is in fashion!

Sandra and Rolf model their REpost fashion at EGU 2017. Credit: Kai Boggild/EGU

Sandra and Rolf model their REpost fashion at EGU 2017. Credit: Kai Boggild/EGU

Back in August last year EGU’s Laura Roberts-Artal chatted with Sandra de Vries to discuss her new company REpost, which recycles old fabric conference posters into new products, such as bags or even clothes!

Today at the European Geoscience Union General Assembly, we caught up with Sandra and one of her satisfied customers, Dr Rolf Hut from TU Delft to find out what REpost has been up to in the last year.

Hi Sandra! First of all, can you give us a reminder of what REpost is all about?

So I started REpost three years ago when I was a masters student in hydrology water management at TU Delft and I was a poster assistant, here at EGU and I had to throw away the conference posters at the end of the day, which people apparently didn’t want to have any more. And I thought it was a sad thing because I could do so much more fun things with them. So actually I didn’t throw them away, I kept them and I made them into a beach bag and a dress, for fun, and they actually looked pretty awesome! I even made a hydrological pencil skirt and I did my thesis presentation wearing it!

Since Laura spoke to you last year, what has been happening with REpost poster?

At the end of my Masters I realised that I still want to do work on research, I want to do hydrology, I want to stay in the water sector, but I had to balance that with running REpost. So, what I did was I started contacting these ‘social working places’, which are places where you work together with disabled people or with people coming back into working society and these working places found a very good way of making, for example this bag, which is a sample version. Now I’m kind of facilitating for anyone who wants to REpost or upcycle their poster into something else and I do it together with those working places.

Then of course after the EGU said ‘wow, this is a good idea and if you want you can promote the idea at the EGU’, then I knew that I had a pilot location and I knew that I could actually see if people were interested in this. And I started kind of figuring out if indeed it was possible: can I do this with social working places, can I do it logistically, can I make my own website, you know? Whilst still doing my other jobs.

From your experience, what kinds of posters work best for REposting?

It is like with normal posters actually, the more visuals you have, the more it is eye catching. So for example indeed you said, you have the fish, that’s something that people look at. Or for example if you have the back side this is also something that people say ‘Hey what’s that?’ It’s like a graph, and there’s a map, what’s on the map, you know? And then people start asking you about your research because that’s actually what I found out is the most fun about it because you have the recycling part, which is nice, but I really think that you could show your scientific message on such a nice and more cool way and you can reach more people than just conference people, you can reach your neighbour and tell them about research and your research and make it more reachable for anybody in the world! That’s what I really like about it.

Doctor Engineer Dr. Ir. Rolf Hut is a MacGyver geoscientist specialising in hydrological data and sensor design. Today he is wearing one of REpost’s upcycled outfits to present his poster on programmable off-the-shelf GPS loggers that can be used and recovered in large river experiments.

So, Rolf, why did you want a data suit made by Sandra?

Well I really loved Sandra’s idea of being able to reuse posters, a lot of people take fabric posters with them, I’ve used them in the past and then whenever we have the opportunity. So last week in the Netherlands I was presenting something at an event where our former queen and some princesses would be, as well as a lot of press and so I thought it would be awesome to be able to show something that you made! Then Sandra just came over to me, “we should just do a suit!” So we just made a complete suit, this one [that Rolf is wearing], and then it went awesome, because they loved it. It got attention because they come to you, because it’s weird! So you explain what it is.. and then you get the opportunity to just give them a soldering iron and say ‘now you are going to make something’, right there. That was really good, I thoroughly enjoyed that.

If anyone is interested in upcycling their poster, Sandra has some useful advice:

Really look at the type of material if you want to REpost it; I recommend flag sheet, it might be a little see-through, but it is very flexible and very cheap and then we can do anything you want with it!

 

Contact REpost via email here, visit the website, on Twitter [@REpost_poster] or you can leave your poster at a facility desk, where you can fill in a form with your request for upcycling.

Interview by Hazel Gibson and video by Kai Boggild, Press Assistants at EGU 2017 General Assembly

 

Head on over to the EGU Booth!

Head on over to the EGU Booth!

You can find the EGU Booth in Hall X2 on the Brown Level. This is the place to come if you’d like to meet members of EGU Council and Committees (Meet EGU) and find out more about EGU activities.

Here you can discover the EGU’s 17 open access journals, browse the EGU blogs (GeoLog, the EGU Blog Network and the EGU Division Blogs), catch up on the conference Twitter feed, and more! We will also be giving away beautiful geosciences postcards, which the EGU will post for you free of charge.

Beside the booth you’ll also find the finalists in the EGU Photo Contest, make sure you vote for your favourite images!  You’ll also find the Assembly Job Spot – be sure to check it out if you’re looking for a job in the geosciences, or someone to fill as spot in your research group.

If you have any questions about the EGU, or want to be more involved in the Union, come and ask us, we’re happy to help!

At the Assembly 2017: Wednesday Highlights

At the Assembly 2017: Wednesday Highlights

We’re halfway through the General Assembly already! Once again there is lots on offer at EGU 2017 and this is just a taster – be sure to complement this information with EGU Today, the daily newsletter of the General Assembly, available both in paper and for download here.

The day kicks off with an interdisciplinary Union-wide session: Vegetation-climate interactions across time scales (US1, 08:30–12:00 in E2, followed by posters from 13:30 to 15:00 in Hall X4). It will bring together palaeocologists, ecophysiologists, geoscientists and climate scientists to explore the different processes through which plants interact with the climate system across timescales. You can also follow the session on Twitter (#EGU17SSE) and catch up with the EGU 2017 webstream.

The second of our Great Debates is also on today. It is particularly gear towards Early Career Scientists (ECS). Head to room G1 from 19:00 to 20:30 to discuss, in a series of small group debates, whether ECS should be judged by their publication record? There will be free drinks provided to help lubricate the conversation. You can follow the discussion on Twitter with #EGU17GDB, and, #EGUecs.

Another highlight of today’s events is the EGU Award Ceremony (US0). Come and celebrate the recipients of the 2017 awards and medals from 17:00 in room E1.

Another promising event set for today is the EGU Award Ceremony, where the achievements of many outstanding scientists will be recognised in an excellent evening event from 17:30–19:00 in Room E1. Here are some of the lectures being given by these award-winning scientists:

The EGU Early Career Scientists’ Forum (12:15–13:15 in L2) is the best place to find out more about the Union and how to get involved. Because the EGU is a bottom up organisation, we are keen to hear your suggestions on how to make ECS related activities even better. There will be plenty of opportunities during the Forum for you to provide feedback.  It’s over lunch, so you’ll find a buffet of sandwiches and soft drinks when you arrive too!

There are a host of interdisciplinary events taking place today. If you are interested in big data and machine learning in the geosciences head to Room L2 at 08:30 for orals, or poster hall X4 at 17:30 for further discussion later in day. While session IE3.1/BG9.58: Information extraction from satellite Earth observations using data-driven methods (13:30–15:00 / Room L2, Poster:17:30–19:00 / Hall X4), is also set to be thought-provoking. Check the conference programme, our EGU Today, for details of a further two events spanning the cryospheric, atmospheric and ocean sciences.

There are more short courses than ever at EGU 2017! (Credit: EGU/Stephanie McClellan)

Now on to short courses! Today offers the opportunity to learn some tips for winning grant proposals with Open Science (SC74: 08:30–12:00 / Room -2.85). Don’t worry if you can’t make it today, it runs again tomorrow at the same time and place. Perhaps you’ve considered showcasing the fruits of your research in an informative science film, but are struggling to identify where you can find the funds to make the film happen. Then the workshop on finding funding for your science film is just the ticket (SC78:10:30–12:00 / Room 0.90). If instead you feel blogging might be the best way to make your work accessible to a broad audience, come along to the short course on the nuts & bolts of blogging with WordPress where you can pick up a tonne of tips to get you started. If you work in the field of natural hazards you can learn how unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can be used for monitoring (SC53: 15:30-17:00 / Room -2.61). Writing your first paper can be daunting, so head to room N2 at 17:30 to develop successful strategies to design, develop and write a scientific paper (SC92:17:30–19:00 / Room N2)

And check out some of today’s stimulating scientific sessions:

Finally, remember to take the opportunity to meet your division’s representatives in the day’s Meet EGU sessions and, if you’ve had enough of the formalities, head on over to GeoCinema, where you’ll find some great Earth science films, including the finalists of EGU’s Communicate Your Science Video Competition. Make sure to vote on your favourite entries by ‘liking’ the videos on the EGU YouTube channel.

Have an excellent day!

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