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Blogs and social media at the Assembly – tune in to the conference action

Blogs and social media at the Assembly – tune in to the conference action

With hundreds of oral presentations, PICO sessions and poster presentations taking place each day, it can be difficult to keep abreast of everything that is on offer during the General Assembly.

As well as finding highlights of interesting conference papers, lectures and workshops in the daily newsletter at the General Assembly, EGU Today, you can also keep up to date with all the conference activities online.

Blogging

GeoLog will be updated regularly throughout the General Assembly, highlighting some of the meeting’s most interesting sessions, workshops and lectures, as well as featuring interviews with scientists attending the Assembly.

Writers from the EGU Blog Network will also be posting about interesting research and sessions during the Assembly, so you can catch up on any sessions you’ve missed and get a feel for what’s going on in the press room through them!

As in previous years, the EGU will be compiling a list of General Assembly related blogs (the blogroll) and making them available through GeoLog.  You can add your blog to the blogroll here.

Tweeting

Participants can keep updated with General Assembly goings on by following the EGU twitter account (@EuroGeosciences) and the conference hashtag (#EGU15). You can also direct questions to the EGU communications staff and other participants using #EGU15, or by tweeting to @EuroGeosciences directly. If you’ve got the Assembly app, you can share snippets of great sessions straight from there!

This year, each of the programme groups also has its own hashtag. If you’re in a Geomorphology (GM) session, say GM2.1, you can tweet about it using #EGU15GM, or if you’re in one of the Educational and Outreach Symposia (EOS), use #EGU15EOS – just add the acronym of the respective programme group to #EGU15! A full list of conference hashtags is available here, and in the programme book. Conveners are welcome to add their own hashtags into the mix too! Just let everyone know at the start of the session.

 

Social_Media

Facebook

The EGU communications staff will be advertising General Assembly sessions and will post about research being presented at the Assembly on Facebook. Just type European Geosciences Union into the Facebook search bar to find the EGU official page, and like it to receive the updates.

And more!

While these will be the main media streams during the Assembly, you can also search for European Geosciences Union on Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube to keep up with us there!

Science bloggers – join the 2015 General Assembly blogroll!

Science bloggers – join the 2015 General Assembly blogroll!

Will you be blogging at the 2015 General Assembly? If so, sign up here and we’ll add you to our official blogroll. We will be compiling a list of blogs that feature posts about the EGU General Assembly and making it available on GeoLog, the official blog of the European Geosciences Union.

We’d ask you to write posts that relate directly to the Assembly during the conference in Vienna (12 – 17 April). The content of each blog on this list is the responsibility of the authors and is not sanctioned by the EGU, but we will make details of all the blogs on the General Assembly blogroll available online.

If you would like your blog to feature on our list, please submit your blog details to us.

In addition to the wealth of interesting new research that will be presented at the scientific sessions, the Media and Communications team have organised press conferences to highlight some of this research to the press and media participants at the conference. The press conference programme will be available a few weeks before the start of the General Assembly. Should you spot something there that might inspire you to blog, it might be useful to know that there are limited spots available upon request for scientists who are bloggers or science writers who may wish to attend press conferences. Please email EGU Media and Communications Manager Bárbara Ferreira at media@egu.eu before 10 April if you are interested.

With free (and open!) wireless internet and plugin points available throughout the building and great science throughout the week; we’ve got everything you need to get blogging! International plug adapters can even be borrowed from the Austria Center Information Desk!

GeoLog will also be updated regularly during the General Assembly, featuring posts about scientific sessions, conference highlights and interviews with scientists at the meeting. Please contact the Communications Officer, Laura Roberts Artal, for any questions you might have about the blogroll.

 

Launching the new EGU Blogs!

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Screenshot of the new EGU Blogs webpage.

Welcome to the new home of the EGU Blogs! Today we are proudly launching a new webpage which now houses all the EGU blogs in one place. We have redesigned the website to give the blogs a more modern layout and have implemented a fully responsive page design. This means the new blogs website adapts to the visitor’s screen size and looks good on any device (smartphones, tablets, laptops or desktops). In addition to the their new look, the Blogs have also been expanded to include news from some of the EGU scientific Divisions. In their new webpage you will continue to find your old favourites, including the Union’s official blog, GeoLog, as well as our established blog network.

As well as sharing information about the latest updates, events, and activities within the scientific Divisions of the EGU, the new Division blogs inform readers about the latest research being undertaken in each field. Currently six Divisions are represented in the EGU Blogs but expect more to join in the future. For now, look forward to reading about climate and cryospheric sciences, in addition to news from the Geodesy and Geomorphology Division. The former blog of the Seismology Division, Seismoblog, has been incorporated in to the Division Blogs. G-Soil, which previously had its home over with the network blogs is now known as Soil System Sciences Blog and now also forms part of the Division Blogs.

The network blogs put complex scientific research into context, sharing findings to a much wider audience. The research fields covered by the network bloggers span almost all aspects of the Earth Sciences from mineralogy, geochemistry, palaeontology, geoscience in global development, environmental geoscience, volcanology as well as atmospheric and Quaternary science.

From GeoLog you can continue to expect frequent information about the Union and its activities, particularly its General Assembly. The regular features include Imaggeo on Mondays, a weekly highlight of a photo from the EGU’s open-access image repository, Imaggeo; the Geosciences Column, which covers recent research in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, GeoTalk, a short Q&A with a geoscientist, and GeoEd, a series dedicated to education in the geosciences.

Despite extensive testing, as with any newly launched website, the new EGU Blogs page is bound to have some bugs and glitches. If you find any problems, please report them to the Science Communication Officer Laura Roberts. We thank  Robert Barsch for implementing the new website.

From paper to press release: making your research accessible to the wider public

During the General Assembly, EGU Media and Communications Manager Bárbara Ferreira shared her science writing skills and media know-how in a workshop demonstrating how to write a  press release or post about the latest geoscience. Here are her take-home messages…

“When you communicate science, no one else is more important than your audience.” Bárbara opened with one of the most fundamental points of science writing – you have to keep your audience engaged, and pitch your explanation at the perfect level for your peers, the press or the general public, depending on who you’re shooting for. The other fundamental: “read the paper!” was quick to follow.

The abstract, introduction and conclusion tell you almost everything you need to know to share the science effectively, but important points can still be found in other parts of the paper. Read it thoroughly and unleash the highlights in your writing – explain what’s exciting about the research and why your audience would be interested in it.

Introduction to Science Communication: from paper to press release (or blog post). View the full presentation here. (Credit: Bárbara Ferreira)

The presentation. Click the image or follow this link to view the full presentation. (Credit: Bárbara Ferreira)

If you have time, get in touch with the author. Not only can they check you’ve hit all the main points in your article, but they can also provide you with some juicy quotes to make the piece that much richer.

So how should you structure your post or press release to make sure you keep your readers engaged? Start with the main points – but don’t overstate the findings – and then move on to why the research is important and what the implications of the findings are. More detailed explanations follow. The example below sums up what you need to get across in the beginning of the text, particularly if you’re writing a press release (journalists are always busy so need the essential information at the start).

Before they even get there though, your reader has to be hooked by the title – make it snappy!

The essentials of the introduction – particularly pertinent to press releases. (Credit: Bárbara Ferreira)

The essentials of the introduction – particularly pertinent to press releases. (Credit: Bárbara Ferreira)

You’ve got the structure sorted, but what about content? Here are some of Bárbara’s top tips:

  • Assume your reader knows nothing about the research, but don’t assume they won’t understand it
  • Aim for one idea per sentence and one concept per paragraph to get your message across without overloading your audience with information
  • If you need to use jargon, explain what it means, and keep acronyms to the barest minimum
  • Use metaphors and everyday examples to share your message

Unlike this string of dos and don’ts, your article shouldn’t be a steam of facts. Create a story to guide the reader through the findings and, if you can, add a human element to the tale so readers can relate to it all that little bit better.

Once you’re done, fact-check, edit, proof and publish.

There are no hard and fast rules for science writing – this only a guide to get you going. If every science piece or release was written the same way, well, reading them would become a bit monotonous wouldn’t it? Break these rules, make your own, and keep writing until you find your own signature science communication style.

By Sara Mynott, EGU Communications Officer

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