GeoLog

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Join the EGU Blog Network!

Join the EGU Blog Network!

After announcing earlier this week that we are sadly saying goodbye to the EGU network blog Between a Rock and Hard Place, the time has come to find a new blog to take their place. If you are an Earth, planetary or space researcher (a PhD student, an early career scientist, or a more established one) with a passion for communicating your work, we’d like to hear from you!

We currently feature blogs in palaeontology (Green Tea and Velociraptors), international development (Geology for Global Development), geochemistry (GeoSphere), atmospheric sciences (Polluting the Internet), and more! Initially, we are looking to fill the gap left in the network by Between a Rock and Hard Place, which covered broad themes within volcanology and petrology. But, with so much great geoscience out there, we’d love to receive blog proposals from more fields within the Earth, planetary and space sciences we don’t yet feature on the network. This also means we may not limit the addition to the EGU network to one blog; if there is more than one strong candidate we’ll consider expanding the network further.

The network aims at fostering a diverse community of geoscience bloggers, sharing accurate information about geoscientific research in a language understandable not only to fellow scientists but also to the broader public. You, as an expert in your own research area, are in a better position than we are to share recent development in your area of research.

The benefits: apart from your site gaining exposure by having its posts listed on the front page of the EGU website, we will also share highlights of your work on our social media channels (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+) and advertise the blog network at our General Assembly, which has over 12,000 attendees. And, of course, you’ll get to join a great community of bloggers!

With the exception of An Atom’s-Eye View of the Planet, the network blogs are authored by early career researchers. In this call for bloggers we are particularly keen to add diversity to the network, and particularly welcome applications from more established scientists.

Having an existing blog is not a requirement for application. However, if you don’t have a blog already, we’d like you to have at least some experience of writing for a broader audience, be it as a guest blogger, or contributing to outlets such as The Conversation, for instance. In this case, let us know what you’d like your blog to be called, what topics you would cover, and link to articles you’ve published in the past.

If you’d like your blog (or blog idea) to be considered for our network, fill out this form by 11th September.

Join the EGU Network blogs . Credit: ClkerFreeVectorImages (distributed via  pixabay)

Join the EGU Network blogs . Credit: ClkerFreeVectorImages (distributed via pixabay)

Please note that only blogs in English will be considered, as this is the EGU working language, and the language of the blog network. We particularly encourage applications from all European countries, not just English-speaking countries, but bloggers from outside Europe can also apply.

Feel free to contact the EGU Communications Officer Laura Roberts if you have any questions. In the meantime – happy blogging!

The EGU Network blogs are looking for guest contributions

Are you a budding science writer, or want to try your hand at science communication? You might just be the person for our EGU network bloggers! A number of our network blogs would like to give their pages a bit of a boost and are seeking guest bloggers to contribute new, informative and engaging posts on an ad hoc basis.

If you’ve recently been thinking about trying your hand at blogging, but aren’t sure if it’s for you or simply have a great story or research that you’d like to see ‘in print’, why not give guest blogging a try? Read on to find out which blogs are looking for contributions.

Four Degrees

4degreesWritten by Flo Bullough and Marion Ferrat , Four Degrees, looks at environmental geoscience issues from a science for policy perspective. Environmental geochemistry, climate change, policy and sustainability are brought together in this blog and explored at the interface between science and society.

Flo and Marion are looking for guest contributions, but would also be happy to welcome a more regular blogger to their team. So if you are interested in geoscience and policy and are looking for the opportunity to get into some regular science writing, fill out this form and Flo and Marion will be in touch soon!

Geology for Global Development (GfGD)

GfGDGfGD is a UK-based organisation, working to support young geologists to make an effective contribution to international development. The network blog is a place for the organisation to share articles, discussions, photographs and news about the role of geology within sustainable development and the fight against global poverty

Blog editor, and founder of the organisation, Joel Gill, has his hands full running the blog, the organisation and completing his PhD. As a result, the blog is particularly looking for guest contributions which explore the principles of international development and how the earth sciences can make a difference. Take a look at the blog for some inspiration and pitch your ideas to Joel using this form.

Geology Jenga

JengaA broad range of topics find their way into the posts of Geology Jenga, with authors Dan Schillereff and Laura Roberts Artal writing about all things science communication, their careers as budding academics, as well as the science behind geophysics and geomorphology.

However, since finishing their PhDs, the demands of their 9 to 5 jobs mean that Dan and Laura have less time to write and would welcome guest contributions on any of the topics above. If you’d like to contribute to the blog, why not get in touch with them using this form?

GeoSphere

GeoSphereThe term geosphere is an all-encompassing word that incorporates just about every aspect of the earth sciences. This means that topics ranging from geophysics to geochemistry to geobiology are part of the geosphere. The blog Geosphere honours its namesake by covering any and every topic in the geosciences. However, with blog author, Matt Herod’s research interests in geochemistry and hydrogeology you’ll likely find more posts on these topics.

Matt aims to make science clear for anyone that should stumble upon the geosciences and enhance awareness of the geosphere. If these goals resonate with you, then you writing for the Geosphere blog might just be the thing for you. Why not get in touch with Matt using this form?

Polluting the Internet

PollutingWill Morgan, an atmospheric sciences researcher from the University of Manchester, blogs at Polluting the Internet. Focusing on tiny particles suspended in our atmosphere, called aerosols, which can build up and pollute our skies. In the blog, Will explores current research in aerosol science, as well as his fieldwork exploits in pursuit of these tiny particles.

If this is your area of research too and you’d like to contribute a guest blog post on the subject, why not give it a go! You can get in touch with Will by filling out this form.

Green Tea and Velociraptors

GreenWhilst swamped by the writing of the thesis, Jon welcomes guest contributions to his blog too. Covering the subject of palaeontology as well as regularly writing about science communication and the open science movement, the blog has a diverse readership and offers a great platform for anyone how has something to say about these topics. Get in touch with Jon using this form.

The network blogs cover a range of topics in the Earth, planetary and space sciences, with the aim to foster a diverse community of geoscientist bloggers. If you’d like to submit a guest blog post, please fill out the forms available above. For general guest blogging guidelines, please refer to the submit a post page on the EGU official blog GeoLog.

GeoEd: Social Communications

GeoEd: Social Communications

We all know that social media is an excellent way in which we can communicate our research (and indeed our rants, dreams, and favourite cat pictures) to the general public, but can we also use it to communicate our research in the classroom? From kindergarten to higher education, social media can be a fantastic learning tool, which can help to open up digital windows into the world of geosciences.

Social media is a rather large umbrella; for anyone doubting this, check out the wonderful A-Z of Social Media for Academia by Professor Andy Miah from the University of Salford. In utilising social media for your teaching practices, it is important that you choose the platform with which you feel the most comfortable, and which you feel will be of greatest benefit to both you and your students. For the rest of this article we are going to focus mainly on: Facebook, Twitter, Skype, and Periscope, but obviously many more platforms are available.

Creating a Facebook group for a specific class or topic can be an excellent way to promote learning and interactivity outside of the classroom. Wang et al. (2012) found that many of the fundamental functions of a learning management system could be easily implemented into a Facebook group, and that encouraging students to use Facebook as a learning tool presents the teacher with the flexibility to engage with students at times that are convenient for them. This in turn can lead to the students feeling more inclusive, and can help to foster a more collegial atmosphere, both amongst the students and between the students and the teacher (Marovich et al., 2010). If using Facebook in this manner, it is important that the students are aware and comfortable with the security settings that are being used. It is also an idea to give several of them administrative rights, as this promotes ownership, and helps the students to self-moderate, which will further encourage the students to learn together, away from their traditional learning environments.

Twitter is a fast, easy method for making announcements, solving student issues, and performing course-related administrative duties (Rinaldo et al., 2011). Using a Twitter Wall, such as Tweetchat, in combination with a designated hashtag can be a great way to promote discussions in class, and can help to encourage those students that would otherwise be too shy or awkward to ask questions. By using a hashtag, it is also possible for the teacher to return to any questions or issues that they may have missed during the session at a later date, and they can also help to inform the content and delivery to future sessions. Using hashtags also allows you curate the conversation using Storify or Curator for a later date, as outlined in this blog post. Twitter is also an excellent way to help teach students about how to network efficiently (Sacks and Graves, 2012), a vital skill in any future career path, and one that will stand them in good stead for the academic conferences of their futures. For those that are interested, this post by the UK Media-Enhanced Learning Special Interest Group (MELSIG) talks further about how social media can be used to promote interaction and inclusivity, and how it is being done across UK HE institutions.

Social media can help bring geosciences into the classroom. Credit: Steveadcuk (distributed via Wikimedia Commons).

Social media can help bring geosciences into the classroom. Credit: Steveadcuk (distributed via Wikimedia Commons).

Skype and Periscope are excellent platforms for bringing geoscience and geoscientists into the classroom. By setting up a Skype chat with a geoscientist in an exotic location, students can get a feel for what it is like to be a geoscientist in the field; they are also presented with the opportunity to chat to real geoscientists about what it is that they do, and why it is that they do it. This is also an extremely cost-effective (in terms of both time and money) method to communicate with geoscientists from across the globe. Periscope brings with it the opportunity for genuine two-way communication in a versatile and flexible manner. If you are a university lecturer then why not set up a live feed when you are out in the field, your students could then watch as you climb a volcano/identify rock types/ take chamber measurements of gases, whilst asking you questions that you can respond to in real time, effectively bringing them with you on your own personal learning experience. You could also encourage your students to do the same, allowing them to share their geoscientific wanderings with the rest of their class.

These are just some suggestions for how a number of social media platforms might be used to enhance the learning experience. The possibilities really are as limitless as your imagination. However, it is important to realise that social media, in all of its many guises is effectively just a set of (admittedly very cool) tools, and that without the required content and competency to complement these, all that is left is a set of ineffectual instruments and a very confused and or uninterested classroom.

By Sam Illingworth,  Lecturer in Science Communication, Manchester Metropolitan University.

References
Marovich, M., Stanaityte, J. & Wankel, C.: Cutting-edge social media approaches to business education: teaching with LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Second Life, and blogs, IAP, 2010.

Rinaldo, S. B., Tapp, S. & Laveriel, D. A.: Learning by tweeting: Using Twitter as a pedagogical tool. Journal of Marketing Education, 0273475311410852, 2011.

Sacks, M. A. & Graves, N.: How Many “Friends” Do You Need? Teaching Students How to Network Using Social Media. Business Communication Quarterly, 75, 80-88, 2012.

Wang, Q., Woo, H. L., Quek, C. L. et al:. Using the Facebook group as a learning management system: An exploratory study. British Journal of Educational Technology, 43, 428-438, 2012

Blogs and social media at the Assembly – tune in to the conference action

Blogs and social media at the Assembly – tune in to the conference action

With hundreds of oral presentations, PICO sessions and poster presentations taking place each day, it can be difficult to keep abreast of everything that is on offer during the General Assembly.

As well as finding highlights of interesting conference papers, lectures and workshops in the daily newsletter at the General Assembly, EGU Today, you can also keep up to date with all the conference activities online.

Blogging

GeoLog will be updated regularly throughout the General Assembly, highlighting some of the meeting’s most interesting sessions, workshops and lectures, as well as featuring interviews with scientists attending the Assembly.

Writers from the EGU Blog Network will also be posting about interesting research and sessions during the Assembly, so you can catch up on any sessions you’ve missed and get a feel for what’s going on in the press room through them!

As in previous years, the EGU will be compiling a list of General Assembly related blogs (the blogroll) and making them available through GeoLog.  You can add your blog to the blogroll here.

Tweeting

Participants can keep updated with General Assembly goings on by following the EGU twitter account (@EuroGeosciences) and the conference hashtag (#EGU15). You can also direct questions to the EGU communications staff and other participants using #EGU15, or by tweeting to @EuroGeosciences directly. If you’ve got the Assembly app, you can share snippets of great sessions straight from there!

This year, each of the programme groups also has its own hashtag. If you’re in a Geomorphology (GM) session, say GM2.1, you can tweet about it using #EGU15GM, or if you’re in one of the Educational and Outreach Symposia (EOS), use #EGU15EOS – just add the acronym of the respective programme group to #EGU15! A full list of conference hashtags is available here, and in the programme book. Conveners are welcome to add their own hashtags into the mix too! Just let everyone know at the start of the session.

 

Social_Media

Facebook

The EGU communications staff will be advertising General Assembly sessions and will post about research being presented at the Assembly on Facebook. Just type European Geosciences Union into the Facebook search bar to find the EGU official page, and like it to receive the updates.

And more!

While these will be the main media streams during the Assembly, you can also search for European Geosciences Union on Google+, LinkedIn and YouTube to keep up with us there!

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