GeoLog

At the Assembly: Friday highlights

At the Assembly: Friday highlights

The conference is coming to a close and there’s still an abundance of great sessions to attend! Here’s our guide to getting the most out of the conference on its final day. Boost this information with features from EGU Today, the daily newsletter of the General Assembly – pick up a paper copy at the ACV entrance or download it here.

The final day of the conference kicks off with the last Union Session (US3) dedicated to discuss possible avenues of progress towards a commonly applicable framework for model building and application. Talks begin at 08:30 in Room B.

If you’ve been inspired to take a more active role in the organisation of the conference, why not head to the short course: How to convene a session at EGU 2017, starting at 10:30 in Room -2.85

Be sure to attend today’s Alexander von Humboldt Medal Lecture by Jean W.A. Poesen, who will be questioning whether research on soil erosion hazard and mitigation in the Global South is still needed (ML1: 12:15–13:15 / Room E1).

The final Great Debate of the week will address on of the biggest questions in the geosciences: Did plate tectonics start in the PaleoArchean? With conflicting schools of thought, it promises to be a lively and informative debate. Be sure to go along and share your thoughts on social media using the hashtag #EGU16GDB! (GDB5: 13:30 -15:00 /Room G1)

It’s your last chance to make the most of the networking opportunities at the General Assembly, so get on down to the poster halls and strike up a conversation. If you’re in the queue for coffee, find out what the person ahead is investigating – you never know when you might start building the next exciting collaboration! Here are some of today’s scientific highlights:

 'Mirror Mirror in the sea...' . Credit: Mario Hoppmann (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A polar bear is testing the strength of thin sea ice. Polar bears and their interaction with the cryosphere are a prime example of how the biosphere is able to adapt to an "Active Planet". They are also a prime example of how the anthropogenic influence on Earth's climate system endangers other lifeforms.

‘Mirror Mirror in the sea…’ . Credit: Mario Hoppmann (distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu). A polar bear is testing the strength of thin sea ice. Polar bears and their interaction with the cryosphere are a prime example of how the biosphere is able to adapt to an “Active Planet”. They are also a prime example of how the anthropogenic influence on Earth’s climate system endangers other lifeforms.

Today we also announce the results of the EGU Photo Contest and the Communicate Your Science Video Competition. Head over to the EGU Booth at 12:15 to find out who the winners are.

What have you thought of the Assembly this week? Let us know at www.egu2016.eu/feedback and help make EGU 2017 even better.

We hope you’ve had a wonderful week and look forward to seeing you in 2017! Join us on this adventure in Vienna next year, 23-28 April 2017!

Laura Roberts Artal is the Communications Officer at the European Geosciences Union. She is responsible for the management of the Union's social media presence and the EGU blogs, where she writes regularly for the EGU's official blog, GeoLog. She is also the point of contact for early career scientists (ECS) at the EGU Office. Laura has a PhD in palaeomagnetism from the University of Liverpool. Laura tweets at @LauRob85.

1 Comment

  1. thats great, thanks
    greeting from Afu University

    http://goo.gl/tfeKBm

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: