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Seismology for non-seismologists

Short Course at EGU2017, organized by the ECS-Team of the Seismology Division
Title
: SC76/SM10.11 – Seismology for non-seismologists
Time: Thursday 27 April, 13:30 – 15:00
Location: Room -2.91

This short course is dedicated to non-seismologists, with a particular focus for young scientists (graduates, PhD students and postdocs). The main goal of this short course is to provide an introduction into the basic concepts and methods in seismology and how these methods are applicable to investigate the near-surface and Earth’s interior. The course will highlight the role that advanced seismological analysis techniques can play in the co-interpretation of results from other fields in the geosciences, such as tectonics, physics, geology, geodynamics, volcanology and hydrology.

The topics covered this year will include
(1) what and how seismologists measure in land and at sea by Laura Parisi and Alba Gil.
(2) how seismologists study earthquake sources and how these studies relate to seismic hazard by Olaf Zielke.
(3) how seismologists image the interior of the Earth with and without earthquakes by Marco Galo and Nienke Blom.

We likely won’t turn you into a seismologist in 90 minutes, but would rather like to make you aware how seismological techniques can help you in geoscience. The intention is to discuss each topic in a non-technical manner, emphasizing their respective strengths and potential shortcomings. Not only will this course help non-seismologists to better understand seismic results but it will also facilitate more enriched discussion between different scientific disciplines.

The 90-minute short course will be run by fellow young seismologists and geoscientists, who will present examples from their own research and from reference papers for illustration. 15-20 minutes will be reserved for questions from the audience on the topics covered by the short course and general seismology.


By Koen Van Noten
Koen Van Noten is an earthquake geologist at the Geological Survey of Belgium. He investigates the influence of site effects on intraplate earthquake ground motions by Did You Feel It?” macroseismic data and near-surface geophysical techniques. Koen’s role as ECS is to encourage students to promote their results in seismology, geology and near-surface geophysics in various ways.

Some reminders for EGU2017 General Assembly

With only 3 days left for the kick off of the annual European Geosciences Union General Assembly (2017), here is a quick-list to go through in time for EGU.

First, read this page for information concerning activities for Early Career Scientists at the GA:
https://www.egu.eu/young-scientists/at-the-assembly/

Sunday 23th April: The Opening Reception, 18.30-21.00 in Foyer E.
Mingle and tingle with the crowd, old, not so old, and young scientists, all in one place. A perfect place for a cheer and networking. A gathering point for early career scientists provides the opportunity to meet like-minded fellows, especially if it is your first time at the General Assembly or you are coming alone.

EU2017 mobile app
The EGU2016 mobile app is now available for most smart phones. Go to http://app.egu2017.eu  to download the app. 

Short Courses
With an ever increasing number of short courses held at the GA,  probably there is one good course for you. Many are held during breaks, purposely not to coincide with other sessions. The full list is here:  http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/sessionprogramme/SC

A quick look on the Seismology Program:  http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/egu2017/meetingprogramme/sm

  • Tuesday – Thursday: Meet the EGU Division President and the ECS Representative of Seismology
    Get a unique opportunity to meet with P. Martin Mai, the current president for the Seismology Division and L. Parisi. You are invited to stop at the EGU booth to ask EGU related questions or discuss ways you would like EGU to improve. Martin and Laura will be available on Tuesday and Thursday during lunch, 12:00-13:30 / Room EGU Booth
  • Medal Lectures
    Get the opportunity to listen to world class experts in various geosciences. Medal Lectures are special sessions that give merit to distinguished scientists. They are usually followed by insightful (and thought provoking)  presentations. These lectures are well attended and seats are quickly taken.

Note for seismologists: the Beno Gutenberg Medal Lecture by Hitoshi Kawakatsu on Wednesday, 26th April between 11:00–12:00 / Room K1. 

  • WednesdayDivision Meeting for Seismology (after the Beno Gutenberg lecture)
    In the Division Meeting for Seismology (SM), the division president will present the latest information on the state of the division, statistics for abstracts and sessions in 2016, and the news related to the various divisional activities. All members are invited, and encouraged to actively participate in the meeting. Lunch is provided.  Wed, 26 Apr, 12:15–13:15 / Room K1
  • Wednesday: Recent activities of the Seismology Division Early Career Representative(s) 
    What is a POM? Ever read a Seismology Blogpost? Are you aware of our facebook and Twitter initiatives? Do you have any comments/recommendations and/or concerns with regards to EGU and/or the Seismology Division? This is the right opportunity to share ideas with your ECS representative(s). We highlight all Seismology activities on a poster that will be presented on Wednesday 26th April, 17:30-19:00 – at EGU2017-13751. Hall X3. Come over and let’s talk!
  • Wednesday 26th April, 20h: SEISMOLOGY SOCIAL EVENT : Meet us for a drink at Mel’s Craft Beers & Diner, Wipplinger-straße 9, 1010 Wien.

  • Thursday: Consider attending our yearly own Short Course: Seismology for non-seismologistsThursday 27h April, 13:30-15:00, Room -2.91. A dedicated short course directed to non-seismologists or early career seismologists, with a particular focus how to integrate seismology within your own research. Every year this short course has been a success. We likely won’t turn you into a seismologist in 90 minutes, but would rather like to make you aware how seismological techniques can help you in geoscience.

Early Career Scientists’ Lounge.

In the Red Level of the conference centre you can find a place to take a break, grab a free coffee or soft drink and gather your thoughts away from the buzz of the Assembly. The lounge is also a great place to catch up with colleagues you haven’t seen in a while and perhaps strike up a new collaboration. On the notice boards you can find information about cultural activities on offer in Vienna. There is also the opportunity to provide feedback via suggestion boards.


By Koen Van Noten

Koen Van Noten is an earthquake geologist at the Geological Survey of Belgium. He investigates the influence of site effects on intraplate earthquake ground motions by Did You Feel It?” macroseismic data and near-surface geophysical techniques. Koen’s role as ECS is to encourage students to promote their results in seismology, geology and near-surface geophysics in various ways.

EGU Seismology Division 2017 visibility survey

Dear Seismology Division blogpost, Facebook and Twitter followers,

The EGU Seismology Division has prepared an online survey to investigate how members are following our division’s activities online. The data we will acquire through this simple survey allows us to learn how we can improve our visibility and to which activities we could further focus. The results will NOT be used for any commercial activities. They will be shown during next month’s GA in Vienna. All division members are encouraged to take part and to spread the word !

Visit the survey here:
goo.gl/CrR7N2

The online survey is an initiative of the Seismology ECS Team on behalve of Koen Van Noten, Laura Parisi, Matthew Agius, Laura Ermert, Lucia Gualtieri, Kathrin Spieker and Martin Mai (EGU Seismology Division President)

Visit the Blog: http://blogs.egu.eu/divisions/sm/
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/EGUSeismologyDivision/
Division on Seismology webpage: www.egu.eu/sm/home/
Twitter account: https://twitter.com/EGU_Seismo


By Koen Van Noten

Koen Van Noten is an earthquake geologist at the Geological Survey of Belgium. He investigates the influence of site effects on intraplate earthquake ground motions by Did You Feel It?” macroseismic data and near-surface geophysical techniques. Koen’s role as ECS is to encourage students to promote their results in seismology, geology and near-surface geophysics in various ways.

Harsher than reviewer 2?

Harsher than reviewer 2?

Have you ever wanted a reviewer who really tells it how it is? You should consider submitting a paper to the truly special publication ‘Frontiers for young minds’.

Frontiers for young minds  is a journal for students between ages 8 and 15 that are curious and passionate about science. However, what’s truly special about this journal is that it is also reviewed by students of the same age, assisted by a science mentor. The journal aims to communicate cutting edge science to young readers in a way that they find both understandable and interesting. Therefore, kids and teenage “young reviewers” are called upon to make sure that complex terms are explained or weeded out, basics are introduced at the beginning, and also that the article is an exciting read.

In going through this process, the young reviewers are supposed to learn about science and the process of peer review, while the scientists who wrote the article receive feedback about their science communication skills and how much their science appeals to an open-minded lay public. At the same time, the journal is building up a collection of texts that can be used by science teachers and interested lay persons – and that are hopefully more exciting and up-to-date than many schoolbooks can ever aim to be. Many reviews are actually performed by school classes who work on it together as a project.

The first articles were published in 2014; the journal is open-access and financially supported by the Jacobs foundation. This enables the journal to make submissions free for authors. Articles are subdivided into thematic groups. “Core concept” articles lay the foundation for young readers to understand the more current contributions, or “new discoveries”, based on recently published papers.

The journal for kids is the junior branch of a “grown up” series of open access journals called Frontiers. Frontiers is itself a young publication series, having started out in 2007. While several frontiers journals such as Frontiers in Neuroscience are widely known and highly ranked among the open access journals of their respective fields, Frontiers in Earth Science, which started out in 2013, has published only about 250 articles so far, and has yet to be assigned an impact factor. Thus, it is not surprising that most articles featured in Frontiers for young minds come from the fields of neuroscience and other medical research fields. Still, the section ‘Understanding the Earth and its resources’ features articles relating to geoscience, in particular environmental science. Who knows who will write and review the first contribution in seismology?

While the idea behind the journal is great – imagine how excited you would have been as a kid if the editor of National Geographic wrote to you to ask your opinion on the latest article about Polar Bears? – it obviously also provides a convenient platform for Frontiers to raise their visibility with a new generation of authors and/or their scientist parents. An open question for me is how well the young reviewers are made aware that peer review is not only a process that should embellish the language of articles and make them more readable, but is most importantly an instrument of critical and sometimes fierce scientific debate. It does not become quite clear either whether the young editors are granted the power to flatly reject a submission if they do not like it!

What is certain, though, is that school kids make the perfect reviewers. A blog associated to the publication lets us read some of the young reviewers’ comments on submitted manuscripts. While some politely draw attention to the fact that basic experimental procedures are undocumented –

“It would be helpful if they told us how they took the measurement of brains without actually having to remove the brain.”

others find more direct words about the quality of the manuscript:

“This seems important, but the way it is written is so boring I can’t even get to the end.”

Wouldn’t you have liked to write that under one review or the other…

We are excited to see who will be the first seismologist to brave the harsh review of a classroom full of nine-year-olds! You can have a look at the author guidelines here. Good luck! And let us know if you get published.


Edited by ECS representatives Laura Ermert and Matthew Agius.